Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 10 months ago

Friends and Fiction with Andie MacDowell & Todd Komarnicki

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Five sit down with Golden Globe award winning actress Andie MacDowell and writer/producer Tood Komarnicki to discuss adapting stories for the big and small screen.

Welcome to friends and fiction. Fivebest selling authors Endless Stories, Friends and Fiction is a podcast withfive bestselling novelist whose common love of reading, writing an independentbookstores found them together with jets, author interviews and fascinatinginsider talk about publishing and writing. Thes friends discuss the booksthey've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling.If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in theright place. Bestselling novelist Mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, ChristieWoodson, Harvey Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Munro are five longtimefriends with more than 80 published books. To their credit. Yeah, at theStart of the Pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour totalk about their books, their favorite bookstores writing, reading andpublishing in this new uncharted territory. They're still talking, andthey've added fascinating discussions with other bestselling novelists, sojoin them live on their friends and fiction Facebook Group page everyWednesday at 7 p.m. Eastern, or listen and view later at your leisure. Welcome. And then cool tonight a, um,author, we're so fortunate to be introducing you to two outstandingguests who have had great success bringing books to the screen. We're soexcited tonight to introduce the beloved actor and producer AndieMacDowell and the renowned producer and writer Todd Comer. Nikki Under ReminderThis will be an extended 75 minute program. So don't leave early whileyou're miss some of the very best parts. But first, we have another big treat instore for you. Our beloved are darling Patty Callahan. Henry has a bigannouncement. Will you share with this Patty? The exciting news of your brandsparkling new audio book E a R. Oh, sorry. Mhm A good. All right. I'm Mary Alice Munro. And I'm Mary Kay Andrews. I'm ChristineHarmel and I'm Christie. What's in Harvey E? A wonderful book was soexcited. Thistles. The introduction, everybody, this is a reveal. So this isthe owner of the nurse. You know that it's 22 money and it should be withyour nurse. Not other reason. They think not because of the pandemic, butbecause it's born 1900. So as we know, Yeah. So e. Like my sound working? Yeah,it's a little It's a little off, which is weird. Tell me, um so you're a smile.You guys hear me now? Yeah, actually, Little. Okay, So as you know, I wasonce a pediatric nurse, and, of course, Florence Nightingale was our muse andour example. So finally I wrote a novella about her wild and fascinatinglife before she called, was called The Lady With the Lamp before what shecalls the fuzz buzz about her took over. I explored a young Florence and I asked,Can the daughter of a prominent English family defy Victorian societal andfamily expectations to fulfill a destiny and how the novella is calledWild Swan, and it comes out tomorrow as an audible original. I love the cover.It is standing in front of her family estate holding a book. If you aren'tfamiliar with audible original, they are original audio books put out onlyby Audible, and I am so glad to be part of this program. And the narrator,Y'all is something special. Her name is Cynthia Erivo, and she is a Tony Awardwinning actor who has starred in The Color Purple and she was Harriet andHarriet Tubman, and she gives life to Florence Nightingale in a way Icouldn't have imagined when I wrote it, Sean Yuan, give us an example. Thecarriage came toe Ah, halt! At the stone castles entrance way where twoguards stood waiting in full crimson uniforms for me...

Way Love that voice way out tomorrow,even about audible page Right now you won't find it because it drops atmidnight tonight. But I will post it on the friends and Fiction page Andtomorrow you can Finally, here the novella called Wild Salmon Now onto ourincredible Yes! Well, thank you, Patty. And everyone knows how much I loveaudio audio books. So I'm going to be first in line tomorrow to get myaudible original Wild Swan. I can't wait. Well, now for what we're waitingfor. I am so personally thrilled tonight to introduce not only againstwho really needs no introduction, but a woman. I'm lucky to call friend AndieMacDowell. Andy is the critically acclaimed award winning actress offfilm and television she reached started in memorable roles, including greencard, Michael Groundhog Day and my favorite for Weddings and a Funeral. Isit raining? I had noticed it does always for independent films and hasstarted several, including her breakout Sex, Lies and Videotape in 2012, and hemoved into television well ahead of the curb. Starting in Jane by design on thepopular Seeder Coast Series based on books by Debbie Macomber In 2018, MyLife changed when Andy produced and starred in the Hallmark Hall of Fameproduction off my novel The Beach House, and he is a fellow South Carolinianborn in Peach Town, Gaffney and was raised nearby. He went to New York City,all on her own. She just packed up and went, and she signed with elitemodeling. She was a supermodel who grazed all the major magazines, and shehas been a spokeswoman for Loreal since 1986. Her natural beauty, inside andout, has convinced us all. Yes, she is worth it on television. Sunday,December 13 Dashing in December So welcome, Andie MacDowell e. Love yourhair so great. I know this was a great slide. Loreal. We had a big release.I'm sorry. With the gray, it's a big relief Loreal a break. Yeah. Oh, yeah,sure they did. I mean, I did it during Covic because my roots started goinggrowing out. It's something I've always wanted to experience. I just thought itwould be fun to, you know, to see, um it's salt and pepper. And it's notgonna be salt pepper forever. So I really you know, you know how thatThanks. I'm really enjoying it. And it's panned out really well, I You know,I had to do something for dashing in December because I couldn't go withhalf roots, which is what I had on e convinced everybody know that. Yeah. SoI talked to everybody into it, and it's really working out Well, because thejob that I'm doing now, they're really happy with it. It zeiss toe lookdifferent. You know, I've been the same for such a long time, and I don'treally see it as e. I see it as being like a man who embraces hit the time ofhis life. Yeah, So I like Thio say I'm like George Clooney s. I think that'sthe way I'm very proud. And I'm go, girl, I think I'm looking at a goodYeah, beautiful. Both Patty and I have personal stories to share about ourguest tonight, So I get to start I met, and by chance of the airport one night.Remember? It was 11 o'clock, and it was We're all tired. And it was the It wasthe Atlanta to Charleston puddle jumper and I stood on the jetway and you stoodnext to me, remember? And I was like, Okay, she stood next to me. Okay,Universe. So I introduced myself, and I said, Very nervous. I want to thank youbecause you were the inspiration for a heroine of my novel, and you could haveignored me, But you are typically very kind. And you said what was the name ofthat book? And I answered the beach house. And so you wrote it down. Andyou said, I'm gonna read that book. And so my new case came up. I grabbed itand I said goodbye. I played fair, and I left. I wanted to talk for an hour,but I left. And as I walked out of the airport, I walked by in the oldCharleston airport. There was a bookstore with a glass window and therewas a poster of my new book and my backlist on I went Thank you, God.Because I knew and you're gonna walk by it So you did. Yeah, I did. And I sawyou know, this great big poster e...

...sitting your name in the book. And Iwas like, Wow, that's cool Shit, You know? I mean, this looks legitimate s eI read it and I really loved it. You know, I loved I loved everything aboutit. And I love you know, I love great Southern stories. And Onda, um, youknow, really followed through and made it happen. We did. We made it happen.And I'll always be in your debt for making such a beautiful film. All right,we'll have a lot more questions for you. And now, Patty, how about introducingTodd? Sure. Todd Calmer. Nikki is a New York based prolific writer and aproducer and a friend of film and television as well as an acclaimednovelist. If it is something that needs to be written, he writes it a press.The president and founder of the production and management companycalled Guy Walks into a bar which might be the best name for a productioncompany ever calmer. Nikki and Guy walks into a bar partner. John Bergproduced the Christmas blockbuster elf. He also wrote and directed a movieadaptation of one of my favorite novelist books, Resistance by AnitaShreve. His screenplays include Sully, directed by Clint Eastwood. He haswritten Perfect Stranger, starring Bruce Willis and Halle Berry, and TheProfessor and the Madman, which is set for release or has released and startMel Gibson and Sean Penn. He wrote the screenplay for God's Spy. The TrueStory of pastor turned spy Dietrich von Hofer. He is also working on TheGreatest Gift, which is the true story behind the film classic. It's awonderful life, a bunch of other things on here, but we're going to skip rightahead. In television, he has written plot pilots for ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, TNTand anything with three letters. He has Gooding tm tm Yeah, He lived in NewYork City with his wife, Jane, and their daughter, Remi, and their son,Daschle. Welcome Todd S. E. So much of your bio because it would take up mostof our time to talk about. There are novels and a play in any way. I'm sothrilled to have you sitting here talking to us about movies andscreenplays and life because honestly, writing in life so mingled togetherright now that the more we learn about one, the more we learn about the other.And Todd, I think it's really interesting to tell the listeners thatwe knew each other as Children. We grew up together in Philadelphia and went tothe same church. And then we didn't see each other for over 30 years until Iwrote becoming Mrs Lewis and we both on separate cast shows, a first careerTodd in baseball and meaning and pediatric nursing. And then we bothstarted writing separately, discovering the power of story until our pathsconverged again. So I'm glad you're here. My friends. Welcome. We're soglad you're here. I'm such a lucky boy to be among such amazing women likethat with me in the back door. I was joking before I want to go. I know hims Oh, great. Well, tis the season. So let me ask Andy and Todd. What are yourholiday plans? Andy, what are you doing this Christmas? Well, we were going togo to Montana, but it just seemed so complicated. And so now we just decidedwe're going to go to Los Angeles And I'm hoping my son and his beautiful newgirlfriend is gonna join us and have a dinner and be together. That's kind ofa good, you know, Keep it simple. And your girls air coming. Definitely. Yourwhole crew. Yeah, the whole crew. So you are getting together. I'm glad.That's yeah. Yeah. I'm gonna be super cautious. Flying home, actually. Havethis plastic this great big piece of plastic and I wear the piece of plasticover May on the flight. I really don't care what people think. Good for you. Eu e really look like an idiot. I'll send you a picture. Married out e justdon't care. Actually put it nowhere to get one. It came off of my massagetable and I put it opening and Joe consented to people and said, I'mthinking about using this and I thought, Hell, I'm gonna dio look like acomplete fruitcake, but I feel safer, so I don't know if you don't get sick.It's absolutely worth cares. E o. Also,...

...fruitcake is a big A like AndieMacDowell. Nobody. I saw some little boy was having a heyday laughing at meand one of the flights and I was like, Oh, well, made him happy. But he waslike losing it with his father with this this'll fruit plate Mother overhere, woman in here with this big black e Just a little sign up at this MerryChristmas And that'll be Oh, so, Todd, were you gonna be for Christmas? Ourfocus is pretty much to keep Santa on his toes until Christmas Eve. Way havebeen fleeing this pandemic. We lived through New York City's locked down.Then we harmful down to South Carolina to see Patty in June and lit SouthCarolina on fire. This'll unmasked country now. Now all these states thatnobody wore masks and we drove across. Everybody's wearing masks coming comingfrom New York because we knew what was headed their way. Really heartbreaking,because you can't explained everybody. What's happening? They don't believe ituntil it's real for them. And they looked at us and and my wife and I withour two kids like we were lunatics for having masks on on DNA. Now it's we'vebeen in Los Angeles. We came out for my sister in law's wedding in the summer,and they asked us to stay. God bless him. So we've been surfing the pandemicand our kids have become, You know, Shaka brah hang loose kids, and it'sbeen fantastic. But now L A is shut down. The last 10 days in Coloradotonight we're in Moab, Utah. Show out, out, out to all the more bites And Idon't know where we're gonna be way just a darkness. We will slip into someplace that has a chimney way Yeah, Wow, that's quite a story. I'm sure there'sgonna be a screenplay coming out of that one. Everybody's life is ascreenplay that well, before we get to ask questions, I am going to tell youall about the bookstore. As you all know, every week we highlightedIndependent bookstore, and this week is the Little Boho Bookshop, located inNew Jersey. We love this quaint store that is nestled in the community ofBayonne. Sandra the owner started her career in publishing buying Children'sbooks, and it has remained a focus for her in her book store. So Sander isoffering a 10% discount on all our books and no discount code required.It's a quick click way. That's hard to say fast, quick click way you buy yourbooks and support a wonderful bookstore, especially in the holidays. The link ison our Facebook page, and the store has a designated friends and fiction pagefor easy access. So tis the season, and if you purchase one of our books fromthe Little Boho Bookshop, you'll get it autographed with our book plates. Oh,for what everyone has been waiting for. Let's talk to Andy and Todd. Patty, how about asking the firstquestion? So, Todd, I know everyone wants to talk about health and sullyingand books to film, and we will. But we have so many writers who come to ourshow and mayor need to hear your story because it is so inspiring. Tell usabout your reasons for entering the writing field and a little bit how youended up where you are now a star athlete and then a poetry class andthen boom, tell us about that change and how that happens. Wow, the writingtip is gonna be 25 minutes long. I'm not writing tip time. I'm teasing.Listen, all I can say is that the great quote about how do you make God laughis tell him your plans. There's there's no have a great line for anything in,as Shakespeare said, Loves true course is never a straight line. So the storyof my love of my life and us having kids was impossibly circuitous, andit's the same way with with life and what my life has been. I had nointerest in writing. I loved movies but have no interest in being a writer. Iwasn't pursuing it at all, and I had completely squandered my collegeeducation and weak in college. And I was entering my senior year adrift, notknowing what I wanted to do or how to do it and knowing that I had learnedanything. And both my sisters had gone to Wheaton, and I asked themindependently, Is there a classes? Maybe there's one class At least Icould have is a life raft experientially. So I don't leave withnothing. And both of them recommended...

...the same professor, a woman named JillBaumgartner, extraordinary, extraordinary human being in a poet anda brilliant person. Anyway, Winter and I back in the day. I've told this storybefore. It never gets old I went there with my classic mullet haircut. It wasIt was a championship, mullet. It was It was a baseball players mullet. So itwas sort of completely matted down in the front from my baseball had alwaysbeing on. And then this long gag just looked like a former Wolverine. Youknow, like an animal that I killed. It was coming out the back of my neck andmy only defense for it when my kids see the photos is that photo was rockingthe exact hair back. Same time street crap. You know, I was just, you know,was following in cool Rock. But I went in there with the mullet and my my myhat in my hand And I said, Can I take a class from you Are not in English,Major. And is there any way you'd be kind enough? Thio E would be 100% offmy books. A You don't have to go to a bookstore. Just, you know, the secondlater and, you know, it's on a little piece of my muller. Um, the, uhactually we're teaching was the 400 level class of advanced poetry writing.And she said to me that you you can't audit my class. I don't do that. If Iput you in the class, I'm gonna grade you on the same level I have with allthese students have been taken my classes before. And I knew that mygrades were so poor it didn't matter. It was not going to get a bad poetrygrade and not get a job in life. My prospects were dim enough. I took theclass and I told Patti when we did podcast, the patchouli was heavy in theair. I refused to the smell of locker rooms, and instead you walk in andthere's, you know, there's a beaded curtain that you have the oh, you know,the various er basis aromas coming all these layers and all these talentedpeople. But I was not among that tribe. And so I sat to myself and I get myhead down and I took what Jill said very seriously because of my sisters.And for the midterm, we had to write 10 poems as our exam. So villain l threeverse haiku, a sonnet. And at the end of the midterm class, she handed backeverybody's papers except for mine. And then she dismissed the class and sheasked me to stay afterwards. And while I was sitting there runningmy hands through my mullet thinking do things I was thinking. Can you get introuble in college? Is there Is there detention? Can she really told me inthis classroom. E you have to sit here because I had spent most of my growingup here in the principal's office. So I thought, I'm old enough. I don't haveto listen to this on. I wanted to get up and then I really thought my deeperfear, which was Can you write poetry so poorly that you could be kicked out ofa class on? And when the door shot and I was the last one in the room, DoctorBaumgartner walked over to me and she laid down my my papers in front of me.The poems with cover page just had my name on it and circled ironically inred ink. Was the letter a That was that was my scarlet letter. That was theletter that would denote the rest of my life because Dr Baumgartner said to me,was if you want Thio. You could be good at this. Wow, what inspiration? We'vehad so many people talk about how they've been discouraged by teachers.So it's nice to hear how a teacher that's beautiful, that was the needleskipped moment and she shot me off into into writing. And I do want to connectto things, because this has to do with my dedication page of my first novel isthat I dedicated it among other people, too. Dr. Jill Baumgartner minor ofdeeply hidden talent because what you saw in me was not at a professionalgrade, but she sniffed it out like looking for truffles. E. Thea. Otherthing is that my my Uncle David, who I believe is listening, and he currentlyhas a beautiful book out called Five Stars in the Window, which is a memoir,which I highly recommend. Beautiful. It's on Amazon, but he gave me theinspiration to write my first novel, and we were at Christmas time Big coma,Nikki family Reunion party that we had every year. He's putting on his coat inour foyer and in Radnor, Pennsylvania, and he just randomly says to me, Haveyou ever taken a legal pad and drawn a line right down the middle on and onthe left hand side. Written a thought...

...as it came to you. But then when Ifthere was any interruption to that thought at all, just move to the otherside of the page the other side of the line, and right out that thought, getrid of it, get, you know, spew it out, don't try to connect them and thenreturn to your original thought. Uh huh. And I said, Well, no, I haven't everdone that. It sort of sounds like a jazz novel, like leaving the melody togo Rift but always returned to the melody. And he said, Exactly. And sixweeks later I started writing my first novel, which was ultimately called free,but which I called on every single page. I just wrote the word jazz, and that'sthe formula by which I wrote that book and it gave me permission to write thatbook. So again, a grown up with a new ability to sniff out inspiration andoffering gift. Jill did it. Michael David did it. That's the kind of stuffthat sets you free to actually go tell your story. Well, I'll tell you that. Ithink we just got our writing chip. Andi, you've chosen roles that havebecome iconic, and there is no guile in your characters. I think everyoneyou're when you're on the screen. It's just so authentic and you shine inromantic comedy. But you're also dig into tough rolls on those showcase yourtalents, such as Suzanne in the grieving widow in love after love. Somy question is, what is your process? How do you connect with the characterand is this Ah must for you that you make that connection when you decidewhether or not to do the role? You know, I wish it was always like having allthese offers and own Amy. Which one shall I dio? E wish that was myexperience, but it really hasn't been my experience. I have had things cometo me that I just did not want to participate in. And then I've hadthings come that were obviously gorgeous, and I couldn't believe theycame to me. That's basically what's happened. Um, Andi, I think, you know,like after sex lies in before sex, lies and videotape, I really struggled. Youknow, it was a hard time. I didn't know if I was even gonna make it. Um, butafter six early. I'm sorry. That was That was Yeah, it was relatively early.I was 30. So it wasn't that I wasn't that young. Um, but after that,everybody change that tune. As soon as you're in something that's successful,it makes a lot of money, and especially if it's critically acclaimed, everybodywants you. You know, it's just like that. And, um And so after that, Istarted getting some offers that were very similar to that character, which Ididn't want to repeat. And then, you know, I've got some really fun roles,like even Hudson Hawk, which nobody talks about. But it was a lot of fun.And let's see, green card, you know, e really like love. That one was sure.What was it like to act with Geroge a hard Oh my goodness e. You know, he'sloads of fun, his terrible reputation, but I've never seen any of thatbehavior. E have some inside stories. I could tell you E did another moviecalled Harrison's Flowers. Many years later, which is, you know, It's a goodmovie. It's not like a big commercial success. Um, but I'm proud of it. Ithink the work in it is good. Anyway, I was in Prague doing this movie, andGerard was there working, I think on anyway, Musketeers I think he was therewere going on the Musketeers. Yeah, and I had one of my good friends with mehelping me take care of my daughter. And hey had gotten in touch with me andwanted to come over and cook for us. E so amazing eso he came over and cookedfor us, and he bought, like, a case of wine. It was like his own for personalwine on, uh, finally, I don't know. Finally, around midnight, I told him Iwasn't going to sleep with him, and that was kind of the end of the way. Sofunny, because we were all dancing and have a good time really drinking toomuch. And I finally just turned him in. Since your heart, I'm not going tosleep with you and immediately turn to my friend Ana. Adrien Brody was in thattoo. It was a great it was a great night. Really. not much of a partier,but that night, way, way and everything. I don't know how professional of thistelling you that story, but wait their role. Like you say. I really, reallywanted Thio. That's the question.

That's right. Um OK, so your time goesby, I think I think you know what? This is what I thought of when you askedthat question. I think a lot of times when you're younger because it gets,you know, it dries up for women. A lot of times they talk about that, how itdries up because leading romantic roles are offer young people. It's very rare.You're not gonna find somebody who wants to very rare that you're going tosee a romantic story about older people. They're just not interested, you know?But the great thing about getting older is you get juicy roles. That's Yeah,that's what happened. So Suzanne was I was shocked. I was like, I couldn'tbelieve this young man wrote a story about an older woman having sex, youknow? I mean, it's just like it was like, Wow, thank God you know, not onlyhaving sex but complex feelings about it was very complex. Yeah. And also,you know, so many things, like so many complex feelings. And she was, you know,the way she was written, she was beautiful. And they dressed me. Theydressed me gorgeous. I was intelligent. I wasn't, um, em all I was, you know, aforce to be reckoned with. Really interesting on. You know, I wasrelieved to get to play that character, and the character that I'm doing rightnow is absolutely fabulous. And I just couldn't believe I can't believe it'shappening. I'm just having the time of my life. So that's that is the rewardsof getting older is I think people stop thinking about how you look, which isconvenient. I think my looks Actually my I lived off my looks in a way andthey also got in the way. I think a little bit of it. I e yeah. I thinkthat they were an asset and also sometimes held me back. I think peoplecouldn't get beyond how I looked. All right. The same thing with my mother.The struggle Israel. You're talking about the mullet. They're very highfashion now. Actually, if they've come back, you know the biggest fight thatmy son and I had during Cove. It was because I made him get his mullet cut.And he was like, This is the perfect mullet. He was furious, and all thekids had them this summer. Like he was like, the whole thing. Yeah. Mulletsair in. Oh, my God. Don't let him see this. Really e taking over the show.This is unbelievable. All right, Christie, I know you have a questionhere. Right there. Yes. S. So this is actually for both Andy and Todd. WarnerBrothers, as you know, sent shockwaves through the film industry when itannounced its entire slate of 2021 films will debut on one streamingservice the same day they appear in movie theaters. And that includes thebig blockbuster films. So it's obviously changes the Hollywood system.And what do you think this means for the future of movies and theaters? Todd,do you want to start with that one? Yeah. I'm gonna start with that one.This is a you handed me about 11 grenades with with about seven pins. Ecould defuse a number of them, but before you go off, I'm gonna leave itlike this theme. Human desire to congregate, uh, need to recover what ison the other side of this vaccine and the return of Broadway. The return oflive music. Press your music of rock and roll. All of these things arelinked. Our leaders need help. Right now. The Biden administration givessome stimulus. Thio don't lose the real estate that houses these screens likeanything. Competition makes things improve. We'll have less dumping formermalls with 11 screens in 600 square feet to show on postage stamps. Andwe'll have Mawr elegant movie theaters to attack. But I think movies will comeback. I think this is a moment Warner Brothers was purchased by A T and T. Sothis is not a Warner Brothers decision. This is a corporate decision that comein T, which is the phone carrier which sees the future sped up by the pandemic.E think their expectation was 15 or 20 years from now. Everybody was gonna bewatching on their phones and their watches and on the inside of theireyelids and their Google glasses, I think that's what their expectation was,anyway, So they have permission to speed that up, and I think that's whythey did it. Yeah, well, it's just it's...

...awful for the filmmakers who have madeextraordinary big screen experiences that are being denied the right to showthem in their original form. You know, if Sully were due to come out next year,I would do destroyed deeply painful thing for my for my colleagues. So Ihate that. But I definitely think Aziz Muchas the press wants to say This is adefining moment. I'm going to stay. It's seasonal now, Andy, What do youthink? I definitely think that there's nothing that's ever gonna replace theexperience of going into a theater and watching it on a big screen with agroup of people because you get that whole reaction from the audience and itza different. It's a completely different experience, and I wentregularly before Cove it I you know, I go once a week to see a movie justbecause I love that experience. Um, a same time I have to say that televisionhas improved and this is the problem. On top of everything else is that thequality of television has is vastly improved. So it is something thatthey're gonna have Thio reckon with. It's just the truth. I confined so manyhigh quality made projects s so many high quality made projects and watchthem on the television. So there is that they're gonna have to, you know,they're gonna have to continue to deal with that. And I don't know that it's abad thing. I think it's also I think it's a good thing I know for myself. Itgives me more opportunity and more places. I think for writers it it's itmore inviting for everybody. It's more inviting, but you're never going toreplace the experience of going to a theater and being with people andseeing it on and seeing it on the the big screen. It's just super, much moreglamorous. Ah, lot of a lot more glamorous it. Maybe it'll be like whatwe're experiencing in the book world is going to be Oh, both. It's holding abook. Yeah, right. All right. I believe Patty, you have a question for both. Soboth of you have incredible demands on your time and you are acting you areproducing. You are spokeswoman for Loreal. You have a busy family. And,Todd, your screenwriting you're releasing. You know, when you have abusy family life, how do each of you choose which project is worth your timeand energy? The five of us air. Always talking about what? We want to do that.But we want to do that. But there are only so many hours and words. And todaywe'd love to know how you decide And if you want to go first. Oh, but Toddanswers so well, let's let him go first, cause I might, you know, think ofsomething while he's talking. Well, I'm gonna I'm gonna make sure I get myFanboy moment in here, so I'm gonna because you let me go first. Andy, I'vewanted to make sure I got to say this in case we never got to speak again.You're so well known for all these iconic roles. But there's there's arole in a moment in this role that I believe for me had a major impact onthe the ability for women to speak intoculture and change the conversation and take the reins back. And it was in themiddle of a comedy and it was way ahead of its time. But I remember theexperience of seeing it happened. I'm going to share in the second andrealizing when I saw it. Oh my goodness, that's 100% right And the world doesn'tlook at things that way. And the moment is in Multiplicity, which is abrilliant film, is when Michael Keaton says, Here's how things were going togo. He's gonna lay down the law because he's faced all the complications andhe's gonna figure it out. He's come out of his man cave and he's got the truth.Here's how things were going to go, he says, Toe Andy. And and he says No, Youthink you're gonna go? They're gonna go this way, this way and this way And shedestroys him because not only is she right, but she's strong now. I was longbefore I was married, and believe me, I'm not being, you know, Ray Romano, uh,hemmed in disappointing husband. When I say, Guess what? Guess who knows theway things should go. My my wife knows she's not right 100% of the time, butusually when I say hey, here's what's gonna happen, she says. No, here'swhat's gonna happen six or seven hours later or 10 minutes later, I have tosay, just like a gallant, you are completely right. That was healthy. Ewanted to thank you for that as the front end of my answer. Uh, that'ssweet. Well, I'm sure it's Harold Ramos.

You need to think, not me, because ethink he was very hey was just such a really a genius. He was such a A reallygood man. And I think I remember I remember him saying something. Thisreally should have been about five women, which was the truth. E truth e.I have thought about it. Can tell you many times I thought I wish I couldjust if I could just multiply myself because of all the stuff I know I couldget done if I could just multiply myself eyes the truth. Yeah, HaroldRamos was really great. Just a great guy and I can't believe I got to workwith him two times. I was so lucky. Yeah, everybody needs to check outMultiplicity. It's the fence exquisite performance by Andy, and it's a greathelp. Um, my answer about projects is, uh it's a spiritual one. For me, it'sprayer. It is just completely I have stopped wanting to do what I want todio probably about 10 or 15 years ago. I have stopped wanting what I want ethat it was leading me to a lot of frustrating situations and then hishead into walls and not bringing fulfillment. And when I surrenderedthat and just said Okay, God, what do you want? I'm gonna get out of the way.My life has been so much easier and so much sweeter eso when projects come upand I'm blessed with getting a lot of things on the on the transom that'swhere I go. I just ask and I surrender and I listened. And fortunately, so farthe choices have been blessings. That's beautiful. E Oh, well, you know, for me,it's like I said, it's not always everything that yeah, I saw this quoteactually re quoted it on Instagram was like, get recognizing when doors haveopened that you've always wished for on, I guess. I guess that's sort of likewhat's happening right now? Yeah, I've always wanted this, but you you don'tnecessarily get what you want. That's that's the thing, you know, and youhave to be grateful for what you've received. You have to say I'm sothankful for the opportunities I've had. You know, you don't always get what youwant. But every every once in a while that happens. And e I talked to MaryAlice. We talked about trying to get to write a book, But I congratulate all ofyou. I don't know how you do it. I don't know that I have the Stana, Ma.Just sit down that long won't give up. Never give up fucking up on findingsomething or finding something. Creating something is, you know, it's along process. It did happen with the beach house and on something thatsparks your interest that much to make it follow through. So a lot of timesI'm waiting. I'm waiting for a gift. Unfortunately, you know, you just havetoe pray or hope. It just drops into your laugh, you know? And sometimes itdoes a car man got an airport? A I'm Christian. You have a question? Yeah.Todd, this one is for you. So many of your screenplays or adaptations of truestories, including, of course, the spectacular Sully, Uh, starring TomHanks, which tells the true story of Captain Sully Sullenberger. Bringing aplane down in the Hudson theme through story behind the film is incredible,but the film brought it to life in a way I honestly never could haveimagined. And I know exactly what you mean about needing to see it on the bigscreen. Um, the Professor and the madman, which is about the creation ofthe Oxford English Dictionary, is another example of you bringing a truestory toe life. Can you talk a bit about why you've been drawn to bringingriel stories like that to the screen? And how does that compare from astorytelling perspective to bringing to the screen something like Elf, which,as far as we know, is pure delight? Me? Oh, well, I'm not allowed to talk abouthow Oh, my God, fiction is involved in, uh, well, I would say the thing thatcomes to mind is that it's a sacred trust when you know that if someone'sreal life, especially when the person is alive and you're gonna be puttingwords in their mouths that work in a movie, but they've never said becausepeople don't speak in movie dialogue. And if they if they speak exactly asthey are, that's great in the documentary, but not when you have backand forth and flow and you need the rising falling action and to reallytell the story. So the sacred trust of memorizing a human being and Sully wasso gracious with me and allowing me to...

...see every side of himself and to talkthrough the process, start to finish, so that at the end of it, when hewatched the movie for the first time when he walked out of the screening andWarner Brothers, this is what he said. He said. You got my marriage right andyou got the flying right just and that meant the world to me. Oh, the secondtime you went, watch the movie, he came out. He said, Wow, that's a really goodmovie. But when you're watching your life on screen, when Tom Hanks playingyou, it's a completely different scenario for what's happening inside ofyour chest. That's how you feel. So e. I feel drawn to this because I thinkthat there are endless stories that deserve to be told. But everyone'sstory needs to be told with that kind of tenderness and respect and honoring,and that's sacrosanct for me. That's that's like when I first sit down withsomeone, I tell them Whatever you entrust to me, I will take care of you.I will tell the truth. I'm not gonna, you know, shade it this way or that. Soyou look good. I will tell the truth. But I will honor you until the end. Andit z paid off emotionally and very actually and materially that z what wetalked about, what you're it's not so much what you're looking for. Both.This is for both Todd and Andy. Um, that you're you're both described howsometimes a book or project comes to your like you just know it's it's agift, which I think is very cool. It's an answer I really wasn't expecting. Sowhat I wonder is, what is it about the gift that sparks you to say I wannamake this? Is it, um storyline? Or it could be the setting. Yeah. What is itthat jumps from the page that you go? Oh, yeah. This is something I want todo. Usually for me, it's about character, because that's that's what Ineed. I need e need, depth of character. I need something that's complex andinteresting. And and, uh, you know that where you can, where you can knowyou're gonna feel who this person ISS, that you can translate it that you knowthat you have that you have it that you, you instinctually or you congrats.Gather it for me. Mostly, it's instinct. It's also ex personal experience andpersonal knowledge and empathy for even if it's a bad character input filling,the understanding, the complexity and the empathy of the character. So, ah,lot of times like people will ask May. So tell me about what you're doing, andI always describe it through character. It's interesting because that's whatresonates with me, is the character, and sometimes I forget to actually getthe whole story out because I just get stuff on E took on. The character isI'm like, there's this person and this person is like this, and this person islike this and oh, you know, for me, it's always about the characters, andeven if it's not me. I'll look at it and I'll go. I love that character.Like when I'm reading it. I'm always I'm always looking at the characters.That makes sense. Yeah, that's what you Yeah. Todd, how about you? For me, it'sthe untold card. Everyone thinks that they know a story that's trueespecially my goodness, the blowback When Sully was announced as a movie,the mockery like, Hey, everybody knows it took three minutes and the happyending. Why are they spending $60 million to make this movie? Nobodycares. I mean, that was the whole thing all the way up until the movie wasreleased. Like even in the weeks before the movie came out Just the last twoweeks, all the prognosticators were No one's going to see this movie becausenobody cares. But the untold story is something that I knew about that nobodyelse knew, which is that the NTSB, uh, spent 15 months. I had to collapse itinto four days in movie world. Quickly spent 15 months, her rang ing sullyabout what happened during his heroic moment. They call the night and day,and he lost £35 and he wasn't allowed to fly and they called him alone andthey called him by this copilot and they didn't have transcripts of thosetalks pages, the transcripts about theofficial report. But three NTSB was doing their job. They're they'reThey're really, really good at their job. But they just weren't used tohaving surviving pilots in a crashed it just what happened. And I think therewas a level of disbelief. Yeah, this could actually occur, and I think theywere looking for something that waas...

...just a little off. But there wasnothing off, and these guys did it perfectly. And they brought years ofexperience in preparation. Right, man, right job, right time, their humanity,their awareness. And, uh, one of my favorite things is, and this is not inthe movie because totally, it was wrong. But after they landed on the on thewater, they looked at each other. Pilot Copilot said, No, that wasn't so bad.That's a that's incredible. Badass is so a untold story with incredible wasthe reason that movie worked, and the reason that every every nugget thatthat I find always looking, you know, from this angle, has anyone seen thelight reflected from this coin at this time of them in this way. Wow. Well, that's a hard question, toe.Um, answer to follow. But Mary Kay, I know you have a question. I do. And it kind of strikes a chordwith me because I think maybe Todd, what you're talking about is a littlething we call ageism. Eso, Andy. That leads me to my question for you. Youknow, it's well known that movie makers are a blind when it comes to maleactors. They 70 years old and playing a 30 year old, but not so much for womenlike us. So I'm wondering, have you been able to maintain a lasting careerin this business with that kind of challenge? Is it Is it a matter ofpursuing and even developing the kind of projects that you want to beinvolved with? Is there a dream roll out there that your e I'm open togiving you loads of ideas that Z I'm fine. You could welcome to call me andwe could talk about that. Yeah. I mean, yeah, it's a struggle. It is a struggle.And I wish I was in better light because I look really halfway good formy age. But e don't have one of those ring lights or anything right now. Andthe natural i e I look so much better. E You look amazing to answer yourquestion, I think, Yes. I mean, you will see, like all the men get over myheadphones and I am All the men get older and they're cast with. Can youhear me? Yes, you can hearing you. Okay, I've lost you. I can't see. You can.They're from Okay. Uh Oh. Are you there? My back? Um, we're not.We can hear you. Yeah, well, we're waiting. Can you hear me? Say thank you?And the house? You can hear a You can you can hear May eso to. And I can'thear you guys. So what am I gonna dio? Oh, uh, sh OK, wait. That's what itsays over here on. Why don't we get you checked? And I'm gonna ask the question.And how did you get your work? Because I can't hear you guys. Um, I'll takeyou. You Abby, why don't you ask that she's gonna let's go to the viewerquestions and answers. And then we can come back to Andy. How's that? Ecommend Andy, though, on her sense of suspense. I mean, she's just buildingthis. E se were better back. Whatever reading she talked about questioningher lighting and then went all black. E no fast, I'm sure. All right. Um,Christie, let's see what you asked The question. Perfect. Heidi Angle wants toknow what is the what are the biggest hurdles to making a novel into ascreenplay. What a good question, Heidi Angle. Bringing it radio Really goodone. Here's Here's the coolest thing about adapting a novel and and adaptinga true story is similar. I love like I said, the thing that's hidden. So ifyou're reading a novel and there's an offhanded comment about the characterof being amazing at Parcheesi, but then it's never brought up again. I like tofollow that string and saying, Well, you know what Parcheesi? What kind ofgame is that? Why were they in the game? What were they thinking about that?They also like chest, but they also did they play jacks in the backyard withtheir sister and follow the threads of...

...what would make a character likeParcheesi, and if you do that, you stayed true to the character. But youwind up having permission to tell all kinds of scenes that weren't in thebook, because you can't take a great novel and do it Word for word. There'sa reason. A novel. It's 400 pages in the screenplay is 110 and you can'tdescribe things you have to get out of the way screenplays, a blueprint of thehouse that's gonna be built with actors and directors and filming. So you haveto put in this really, really spare way. But if you keep surprising people pageafter page by taking him down those little trapdoors, most hallways thatthe Parcheesi open, then you have them because they didn't see it coming,especially with his best seller. Were like, Oh, well, we know this happenedto this character and they've acted like this, and they never danced underthe moonlight with their husband. But if I can show you how everything that'salready in the novel leads to a scene about dancing in the moonlight becauseof Parcheesi E okay, you have done your job. That is something I love that andrail Parcheesi are going to go off the charts this Christmas. A big Parcheesifan. So I I really like this. Remember the last time I played Parcheesi? Iused to play. I have this neighbor that I that was this older man and used toplay Parcheesi with me. Oh, wait can hear you now, but I can't see you. Youcall right? Why? E don't know. But I feel like there's something kind ofpoetic that we can't see you when we're talking about women aging and roll equestion really quick. I wish you e I do think that we are. We do have theopportunity to change the way people think if we stop it within ourselves.So I've had, like, even with my choice, to let my hair go. Silver. You know,the projection that I get is interesting because there's a lot ofpeople out there that do not see an issue with it. And then there's a lotof people that do see the issue with it, and the people that do have an issuewith it or feel that it ages may need to look at themselves not me, becausethat is where the problem is it Xan. An interior dialogue or a societalacceptance. It's in yourself that is judging a woman differently than you'rejudging a man. And so I can't change that for you. But you you do need tolook at it. So that is part of the problem. And I think there are alsolike I could cast with a lot of younger man. And when I did this Christmasmovie, they I was like, I was showing up for the first time with silver hair.And I'm like, What if the guy has dark here? Of course he has dark hair. I'msure he colors it, but he did have dark hair. A lot of actors color their hair.A lot of male actors color their hair, obviously. But I decided within myselfthat I wasn't gonna say anything to anybody that it bothered narrow, that Iwas even thinking about it because that that shows my weakness. That shows meprojecting that attitude onto myself. So, you know, we're on a journey now.We're you know, we haven't had a female president, which is very peculiar thatthis in this day and age that that has not happened. We've got so muchprogress to make, and it sounds really small. But it's not because how we areperceived as women and how we look. It's also about it's all about power.It's a very much about being able to get ahead and all of that. It playsinto the whole the whole picture. So I would like to do really sexy roles as amature woman because men get to do it all the time. You know, we don't wedon't have that opportunity. Thio continue to be a force to be reckonedwith and a powerhouse and dynamic. Um, all the roles that you would see a manplay at 60 those of the roles I would like to play. Wow. I think you foundfive authors for it. I'm gonna write e were on it in one. Screenwriter E Ifyou click start cam on the bottom panel, you might all right. Thank you, honey.Okay. All right. Mary Kay, while we're waiting, why don't you ask yourquestion? You have one from Jill? Uh, yeah. Hang on one moment. Um, yeah.Jill Cooper Dutcher says once the author has sold the rights to the novel.Do they continue to have involvement throughout filming? It really depends on the power of theauthor and the appetite of the author.

You could have someone that that is newto it, but who demands to be involved. And Onley will cut a deal if they'reinvolved and get to listen. Ah, lot of newer novelists are nervous aboutasking for that, but that's available if they demanded. If people want itenough there, even, you know often they get a chance to write the first draftof the screenplay. Its's remarkable. There's a lot of openness towards thecreator of these things, I p. So there's a lot of love for for novelists,Um, but I would stay. It's fundamentally important for thenovelist to recognize that a movie is a totally, totally different animal toseed the creation of that moving to the movie makers that that's hard, that'sthat's tough. And because most movies were terrible and most movies don't getmade very, very difficult to take your cherished characters and you'rebeautiful book and given into the hands of people that may or may not crush itIt's a deep vulnerability, especially after you spent characters out to theworld and they become beloved, promote many people. The memory of a book ismuch more tied to a successful film or even an unsuccessful film than it istied to the original book. Actors wind up on the cover of the re issues, andthat first thing that conversation between novelist and reader gets moreand more obscure. You know, there's a it takes a tremendous amount occurringto let your novel go into movie world. Well, I have to say, I remember Andy,Can you hear this? Are you out there? You know, it says I'm in the show thateveryone can You are, but well, that's all right. We can hear you. But Iremember I remember when we did the beach house. That was exactly that,Todd. I, um I gave it to Andy, but I really had complete trust that she do.She knew the story. She do well by it and I just let go, and I saw the scriptand things, but it really waas the Andes decision. What was going to go inor not? And I think a lot of it for the author is just to trust who's handlingthe material. Well, there were some things I probably would have donedifferent. So it wasn't. Dan had a lot of power to the producers. And, youknow, we had a very prestigious director, so I didn't There was somethings I probably I wish I actually had voiced my opinion in a little bitstronger. I didn't I know, but, you know, in hindsight,but it's still it's all good. It's all good. But, you know, you do have to letgo At a certain point. We were talking about that yesterday. When we'retalking about another book is sometimes it's a different experience, a booktaking it to film. And you have to think about how it translate onTranslates on film and and you you do have to two hours to tell the story.And sometimes you have thio change things a little bit to make it fit inthat format and be flexible. Yeah, yeah, you have. Ah, few live questions youcan pull up. Um, yes. Um okay, so this one is for Todd and Andy. Um, e wewould love to hear of one project That would be your dream project that youhaven't done yet. It doesn't have to be something specific, but is theresomething that would be a dream project for you, for the future that youhaven't gotten to tackle? That's a good one, right? Right now it's for for usto figure out how Andy could be back on screen e o a show and that everyonecould see and hear May. So I don't know what I've done wrong. Don't everybody?And he's in right now making a film in Canada. So it's not easy for all thisis not in her own home. She was not in witness protection. E apologize. Idropped it. And then you should see how my what my set up is. I've got my phoneis sitting against the knife holder a box? Yeah, I've got just, you know, alight on the floor. That's that's kind of the extent of it, but yeah. What?Does anyone have a project that they dream? E I certainly I certainly do.I'd like Andy to go first. Please. Um well, you know, I was hoping thatsomeday I would get to work with my daughter and I knew that she waas um,adamant about making it on her own. And she didn't wanna, you know, look like Iwas helping her out because I really am not. There's nothing I could do foreither. You could do it at your camp. That's the thing. And s o, I didn'tthink I would get. I thought it would...

...be like on Golden Pond or somethinglike that, that kind of thing. I thought I would be ancient before itactually happened. And I was working on the Christmas movie and I got a callfrom her and said, I'd love you to play my mother So this the project that I'mworking on right now and playing a manic depressive, which is somethingI've always wanted to dio I grew up in sort of a chaotic environment. Andthere's just, you know, she's also very joyful, manic depressive. So I'm havinga lot of fun playing that, And I guess after this I want to play a really sexyolder woman like I want to dress hot as hell. And I just you know, I want on. Iwanna feel I wanna feel like a man feels at my age I wanna be I wanna beable to do everything that they're doing and and and embrace that part ofmyself that that has no fear about where I am right now and actually onand embrace all that power, the power that they get to feel as they get older.That's what that's what I want. I wanna be like, super powerful in, you know,in my prime as they are in their prime and owning it. That's really you know,I wanna dress like, super, like, really great clothes. Feminine, feminine, youknow, like high hills like great high hills like sales. No way, no, that'swhat you're doing right now. Way. No, that's exactly right. I don't know,because on screen, moving up that sort of image we all have in our mind. Um,Todd, I know that very could be very quick. Do you have a writing tip? Thequick bush writing, Jim. Yeah, it's not. It's not terribly long for me. Um thegreatest. And I'm sure for all of you as well the greatest trapdoor ofwriting is procrastination. E. That's the thing. You know, Pro perfectbeginning for that word because we're not amateur crashed in eight hours. Weare procrastinators and the ability to think of anything to keep from writing.And they're wander around and to shy away from your writing desk and createincredible ritual of failing to write on their feeling bad about not writing,and they can consume. You and E have the benefit of writing under deadlinesconstantly, so I don't have the opportunity to give into that. But mostpeople, especially young writers or people that want to write this is a bigproblem for that. So my advice about this is whether it's an apartment or ahome or where you live. You turn every single inch of your house into acreative space. You have your writing desk, but when you get up to go makeyour coffee while you're procrastinating, you lazy punk, you Mr.Coffee is a chalkboard, and it's her notes and over by the fridge. Theirletters for you arranged for ideas. And in your bedroom there's a pad, alwaysby the light. In other words, there's nowhere you can go in your house thatyou cannot right. There is no safe place happen is that you will see thatpool and you will dive into it. And then you will like it so much you'll beswimming around your house and your book will be done before your hair'sdry. There you go, E amazing. I love it. I'm a convert. That careful, Thank youKnow, really, That's really wonderful. Alright, why? Everybody is askingbecause we forgot to let Todd answer. What is his dream project? Okay, that'ssweet. Thank you for let me circle back. I'm on the verge of getting to do it.I've been asked to direct a movie that I wrote called Hearts, and it's thetrue story of the only professional athlete to ever play with transplantedheart named Simon. He's personally responsible for tens and thousands ofpeople's lives being saved, because whenever he tells his story, peopledonate their organs. The reason that it matters so much to me is that when Imet Simon to write this movie, he was essentially in hospice. I went to gethis story like I was getting his last will and testament, and we wepttogether and his family for their hearts out to me, and it's done thatdrove me home from the hotel saying, I'm watching. My father vanished beforemy eyes. And I can look everybody in...

...the eye tonight and tell you this. Ibelieve in miracles. I had never seen one, and right in front of my eyes,Simon Keith. Life became a miracle. At the last possible minute. He found histhird heart, his third heart. And he is now back on tour back speaking alive inbetter shape than any of us, you guys. No, no, He shined so brightly. I lovehim so much. We become like brothers. And that is the next thing I'm FrankMarshall is producing it. Who produced Sully and all the born movies and allglobal movies. And that looks like it. It could dio in 2021. So it's reallywhen you say you believe something and then you actually see it, you have tolive your life on the other side of that. So it's it's altered my view ofthe world e time of year. Thank you for I'm so glad we got Patty. You broughtthat in tow. Have that? It's beautiful. Yeah. All right. Mary Kay, can youremind us about our tonight's bookstore Po Bookshop in Bayonne, New Jersey, andwe love them and, you know, they've had They've had some troubles lately, andso we would love it if you the video link is on Linda, uh, loathe. They hadsome serious they had they had. I'll just tell you they had a death threatbecause they're a bookstore and love it. If you would support them and be therefor them because we believe in that. We believe in authors being there for eachother and being there for Where is this bookstore? It's in Bayonne, New Jersey.Okay, And then the little about bookshop. Yes, and it's on. We have thelink on on on our Facebook page, and you can order all of our books fromthem tonight or tomorrow or for the whole week, and they're offering a 10%off. You don't have to have a discount code or any of that, so you know it'stis the season. And we hope that you will remember to assist for openingyour heart to someone who's who's had trouble. They didn't ask for. Thank youfor sharing that. Thanks. Mary Kay. Um, let's see Christian, You Can you tellus a bit about her upcoming guests? Yeah, sure. So we've been doing thesebehind the books bonus episodes once a month for a few months now. And thisSunday the 13th, we have a very special one coming up with the incrediblyprolific Number one New York Times best selling author Susan Mallery. So thatSunday at 5 p.m. On the friend at 5 p.m. Eastern on the friends and FictionFacebook page and also on our YouTube channel. And then next Wednesday at 7p.m. Eastern time, we will be welcoming Lisa. See the New York Times,bestselling author of The Island of See Women and many other gorgeous transportof novels. So I think they're both gonna be great episodes. And we do hopeyou'll join us. Yeah, and that's a strong book about strong women. Soyou're gonna love a Christmas talk about our ugly Christmas sweater partys O on Christmas Eve Eve, which is what we call it in our house. But it isreally December 23rd, which you guys probably got. We're going to be havingan ugly Christmas sweater party and we're so excited we really want youguys to join us. And, uh I don't know. I think we haven't announced it yet,but were maybe gonna be having, like, a little ugly Christmas sweater party onthe Facebook page that we want everybody to participate in. So it'sgonna be tons of fun. It's gonna be a great way to spend Christmas Eve Eve,and we can't wait to see you there. That's right. And, Patty, you have afinal question. Um, just a simple last firing around the shot here. If youcould magically trade lives with one of the characters you have portrayed orcreated, Which one would you choose? Andy, I'm gonna have to think aboutthis. You guys go ahead. Okay? All right, Todd. Well, it's it's funny Ididn't create the character, buddy the elf, but I'm also often accused ofbeing like Buddy the elf. I really, really loved the notion of movingthrough the world with certainty that light defeats darkness on, but buddyembodies that, uh, not rock and tights very often anymore, but 50 0, my life.But I love the purity of of what buddy...

...says about, and if we can remember atChristmas that with all the disappointment of this year and allthose that we've heard and all the ways we've been locked down and hemmed inand the ways that the disappointment can feel like the tights were wearingwearing thing, it's just on top of us that we can peel it off at the end of2020 and say light winds. Hope is on the horizon. Scene is coming. We stilllove each other. The Christ child is stillborn, not stillborn. But it'sstill being a thief. The you know, Christmas is here, and it can't bestopped. So, like that, that star that's up in the sky guiding us homethat we would always lean toward the light. And I think when we do that, notonly do we elevate ourselves out of the conversation that we're stuck withinour head, but we wind up splashing light on everyone around us. And ofcourse, there's nothing mawr contagious than love and light. Hey, was You'rebeautiful. You're you there? I know you're there. I can't see you What you say. Are you talking to me?Yes. Now, can you hear me? Oh, unfortunately, that beautiful. Thatbeautiful story. Why don't you put the camera on somebody else while I talk? Eo Mary, Alice and talk. All right. Just leave it like that. Just leave, allright? Yeah. All right. So tell us if you gotta teach your question, I guessit would be my character in Groundhog Day. Only because she was so pure. Imean, that's really was she had to be a reflection off hokum, purity and allthings good and positive, you know? So that's good. You know, he's he'sfighting so hard to be with her because of her, how genuine she is and whatkind of person, What a kind person she is. Yeah. And you know the whole story.It's a very Buddhist story. But I did talk about it in old church and ashhole, because it really is about, um, you know, becoming your higher selftruly is about reaching the best part of yourself. It's like cycling lifeafter life after life. Yeah, until you get there, Yeah, you finally get thereon. And then he got to be with her because she was all goodness, she wassuch a pure human, you know, I think both answers. Thoseare the perfect way on our program tonight. What a wonderful night intonight. We're so grateful. Angie, Thank you so much for coming. Sorryabout thank you for joining us. Thank you. Wear so lucky blowing kisses. Allof you. Thank you. Thank you for being here. Thank you. Want to catch the show,lady? You can catch it on our website, www dot friends and fiction dot com.And now on YouTube as well. And don't forget tomorrow morning you can catchthe Wild Swan. Don't order it on Audible Original song. Midnight That upagain on also on Sunday night, December 13th. Don't forget to wash. Watch Andyin dashing in December on Sunday night. That's around, everybody. MerryChristmas A. Do you think today you've been listening to the friendsand fiction podcast? Be sure to subscribe to the friends and fictionpodcast wherever you listen. And if you're enjoying it, leave a review. Youcan find the friends and fiction authors at w w w dot friends andfiction dot com A swell as on the Facebook group page. Friends andfiction come back soon. Okay. There are still lots of books, writing tips,interviews, publishing news and bookstores to chat about goodbye.

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