Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Friends and Fiction with Christina Lauren (Sunday Bonus Episode)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Writing duo Christina Hobbs and Lauren Billings (who write together as Christina Lauren) join the Friends & Fiction authors to discuss their unique process of writing novels as a team and their latest NYT bestselling rom-com In a Holidaze. https://christinalaurenbooks.com

Welcome to Friends and fiction. Five best selling authors, Endless Stories, Friends and Fiction is a podcast with five bestselling novelist whose common love of reading, writing an independent bookstores found them together with jets, author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. Thes friends discuss the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Bestselling novelist Mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books. To their credit at the Start of the Pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour to talk about their books, their favorite bookstores writing, reading and publishing in this new, uncharted territory. They're still talking, and they've added fascinating discussions with other bestselling novelists, so join them live on their friends and fiction Facebook Group page every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Eastern, or listen and view later at your leisure. Hi, everyone and thank you. Thank you so much for joining us on a Sunday for another one of our bonus behind the book episodes of Friends and Fiction. On weekends like this, we love to delve a little deeper and ask more in depth questions about what goes on behind the scenes in our favorite writers lives. We hope you enjoy hearing those answers as much as we dio. But first, before we introduce our special guests tonight, we would like to say hi. So I am Christine Harmel and my latest is the book of last names. I'm Christi. What's in Harvey? And my latest just feels like falling. I am Paddy Callaghan, Henry, and my latest is becoming Mrs Lewis. I'm Mary Alice Munro, and my latest is on Ocean Boulevard and I'm Mary Kay Andrews, and my latest is Hello, Summer. This is a very special bonus episode of friends and fiction. We're all so excited for you to meet the amazing kind, prolific, talented Christina Hobbs and Lauren Billings, who together right under the pen name Christina Lauren. They're the New York Times, U. S. A. Today and number one international, best selling authors of the Beautiful Bastard and Wild season, Siri's, as well as other huge bestsellers, including the UNH's team owners dating you, hating you an autobiography, which I think it's such a smart title, right? They were published in more than 30 languages, have won the R D Book of the Year award and have been named in Amazon and Audible Romance of the Year winner. Oh yeah, and Christina is a former junior...

...high counselor, and Lauren has a PhD in neuroscience. So yeah, they're amazing and honest. Perhaps most of all, they're truly good people with good heart. You can feel that on every page of their books, and you'll see it here in just a few seconds to They're also very supportive of other authors, which means the world in industry like this. So without further ado, let's welcome Christina Lauren e u. That was such a sweet intro, E. I mean, you guys aerial slouches. It's hard to find good guy about you. What have you really done with your lives? I don't know. Thank you so much for joining us tonight. Thank you for having us off. Of course. No, it's our pleasure. We're just so happy. Thio share you with our viewers tonight. So we wanted to remind you all before we get rolling. That tonight are bookseller is Bethany Beach Books and Delaware There a favorite store for all of us, and they're giving you 10% off our new releases with coupon code. We love F N F. 2020. The link is on our Facebook group page, but one very special book you'll find there this week is the brand new novel from Christina Lauren called In Ah, Holidays D o a de ese es with kind of cool, which comes out next week and will be absolute perfect way to dive into this holiday season. So, Christina and Lauren, can you tell us a little bit about in the holidays? Sure. Hi, everybody. Thank you again for having us. I am Lauren. I'm one half of Christina Lauren were co authored zero. So we are always happy to talk about that in the holidays is a time jumping romance. The premise is a little bit like Groundhog Day. Um, where? Malin? She wakes up one morning after the holiday after Christmas and she finds that she has kissed the wrong brother. She has been in love with Andrew her entire life pretty much, and she had a couple of glasses of eggnog and kissed his brother, and from there everything sort of falls apart. It's not just the kiss. It's a million other things that seemed to fall apart. And she makes a wish to the universe to show her what would make her happy. And then she wakes up at the beginning of the holiday again, and she kind of has to figure out how to get what she wants. So I love it. It was really fun to write. It was hard, though. I mean, I think we had that, like, how does one jump through time and not make it boring? Teoh, you know? Yeah, kind of a sliding Doors thing, isn't it? Which is one of my all time films on E won't shoot E. This book is number one on my list. Like, Plus, do we need a holidays book now? Yeah. Oh, my gosh. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Oh, it sounds so good. I'm kind of mad that I don't have a Yes, So...

...we Oh, what is happening exactly? We share a publisher. What's going on here? This is just We have a lot of people in common. Kristen, we should definitely dio publisher. Yeah, right. But you know what? Mary Alice. I also shared agent and a publicist with them. So, like, somebody should have me when I feel like yeah, Like yes, Exactly. Thio from the bookstore tonight. That's right. That is true. Much better idea. We would like to support our authors. No way, you guys, I don't know about you. I do this show you guys the Oh, that's crazy. What are you talking about? The selling une By tomorrow we owe Got a mortgage payment to make you guys eso Christina and Lauren. We all have. We all have questions for you tonight on DWI have incorporated a couple great ones from our readers to So let's get started because I think we're just also interested to hear what you have to say about writing together. Christie, do you want to kick things off tonight? Yes, I would love thio. So I have read that you two met online in 2009 when you were both writing Twilight fan fiction. And then after you actually met in person at a conference, you decided to write a book together. So Kristen mentioned earlier that you both had very busy jobs at the time How did a partnership like that and the decision to write a book together come about? It's pretty incredible. So can you kind of walk us through that? Um So I'm Christina. Hello? Eso we met in 2009 were both writing fan fiction. Low was putting on ah panel at San Diego Comic con on fan works. And I had a popular story at the time, and so she was like, you know, come out and, you know, be on this panel And it was one of those things where the first time we met and we just clicked. You know, if you've ever met somebody that, like Low had just found out she was pregnant, she hadn't really told anybody, and she told me, And so it's funny. We gauge our friendship sort of by, like her daughter, her daughter's 10 nail. So it's pretty great. We just got along so well. We decided to write a little kind of one shot together, which is like a fanfic thing. We had so much fun that we were like, That's right, a book. So we decided to write a book. We wrote a really terrible part of a really terrible, um, super angsty. And anybody who knows us knows we are not particularly serious a lot of time. And so it was just not fun for us. And so a soon as we started writing a book that, like kissing and, you know, high school sweethearts and skinny dipping and stuff it just suddenly we were doing this fun thing with our best friend. And really, in the beginning, I wrote to make low laugh and Low road to make me laugh. And after all of these years, we still write something and just be like, Oh, my gosh, she's gonna die, you...

...know? Or so we're so lucky. That's amazing. What a beginning to it That actually makes me think. One of our members, Joyce Merrill, had asked on the Facebook group page what made you decide to write under a pen name rather than just writing under Cristina Hobbs and Lauren buildings. Why did you decide to become Christina? Lauren? Um, I think we did them mostly because we wanted it to feel like it was a joint process. You know that we we didn't have any intention, really of writing alone. At that point, we just wanted it to be a thing that we were doing together. And also, we put so much time into editing so that it feels like a smooth read that we didn't want readers toe worry that it would sound like too many voices or that it would be clerk in any way. And so I think we really wanted people to trust that we would put time into the editing process. Yeah, that's awesome. What a great reason. Um, Mary Kay, you had a question. I think. Yeah, I have read that in 2013 alone You to put out six books in a single A working full time. How my mind e a question that neither of us can answer because we don't remember that way. E. I'm sure you don't. Wow. Prolific right out of the gate while still working jobs and raising kids and how you stayed so productive because, you know, sometimes you can pull that off in the first burst of energy. But how do you keep keeping on? You're putting out at least two books a year together. So what's your secret to getting the words on the page and doing it in a way that involves two brains instead of one telling us this'll secret requiring line were e mean. To be honest, 2013 is a blur because, as you know, those of you who write romance, you know that the market moves really fast. Readers will read the book the day it comes out for both women's fiction, commercial fiction and romance, thes air, voracious readers. And as soon as they have the book in their hands, they're going to finish it. And 2013 was also a really active time for romance. Um, it was a couple about a year after 50 shades came out, people were buying a ton of romance, and I think you know, the philosophy was to try and get a bunch of books out really quickly, so that you kind of built up a name for yourself in a readership and, um, but our goal was to have everybody every book be better than the one that came before it. And I think that that was a good gold, a set, but also a hard goal. I had a three and a five year old, you know, we had full time jobs and it was just It was sort of a blur, but because it was such a fun job. I mean, we were writing these books together. We're writing with our best friends. Um, it was sort of the dream, you know, like, who gets to do their hobby and their...

...passion for a career. And I think because, you know, we had a big year that year we were able to both quit our jobs and rightful time, and that was really amazing. How does it work? Does do you do ah synopsis together and outline together? So we always outline in person, always. We've tried doing it remotely. It's just not the same. Just something magic happens when we're in the same room and sort of, you know, riffing off each other. And sometimes it can take a couple of days. It's like it comes in little bursts. Eso we will do our outline. We outline sometimes really extensively, sometimes not as not as much. We decide who's going to write what Chapters Low does a schedule because I'm terrible, a terrible about about that stuff and low is great. And then we just sort of stick to that schedule we eat right on parts. Usually it's like a chapter a week, depending on how much time we have. And then at some point we combine it and we always loaded up so the other person can see you know what's come before it. What's coming after we write chronologically, at some point, we put it together and hope that it looks like a book sometimes never does it. We've had to rewrite books before, but and then we just edit and edit and edit and edit so but the process is never the same. It always changes in some way. Every single book. Yeah, meeting. Cool. Patty, I think you had a question also. Well, cabbie took some of my question. That's what I was most difficult now was the outlining and how you did it, because we're all starting to learn with cove it in the pandemic. We're starting to learn how to do things not in the same city or in the same state. I mean, the five of us have done 25 shows and have not been in the same room together in seven months. So when you guys first started writing together, you live in completely different places, right? Lauren, I think you're in Southern California, Is that right? And then, you know you're in Utah. So have you seen each other's and since, Like, how did you start? Just nuts and bolts. How did you start doing this? Did you get on the phone? Did you go back and forth? I'm really curious about then. That's a belts of how that started and how you could share your work in that way. Eso we So we met in person in 2009 on. We just had a really great chemistry together. She's Christina is one of the things about doing this with a co author is you have to have complementary personalities, right? I mean, I could be very intense and neurotic. Christina is very laid back and bubbly, and it just works for us that way. And so when we met in person, we just had a really good vibe and everything we did sort of off the cuff together, felt right. And so now when...

...we outlined on DWI have seen each other. So she drove out to me in June. We hadn't seen we saw each other on March night and then not until, you know, we usually see each other like once a month, A e. I mean, we had, like, quarantined and done all of that. She drove out with her family in a straight shot, and then I went to see her in a lie again, quarantined all of that straight shot to her house, and we're going to see each other. She came out for my birthday in September. We're going to see each other in October again. And, um because the truth is like when we try and outline on the phone, it just It's not the same because we have to kind of noodle around like we're cooking meals together and talking about the characters. And we're going for a walk and like planning the different chapters. And it happens in this sort of organic PC way that I just think if if we call each other on the phone and are like, Okay, now we outline it just it doesn't feel like a natural conversation, you know, that makes sense. So do you start with Do you start with an idea at the beginning and and then you get together and you you kind of see what comes up. Er I mean, how does what's the actual genesis of it? How do you come up with the idea? Sometimes it's been the character, and sometimes it's been just like one line or an idea. You know, I think, um, like autobiography was one that we outlined over probably four or five years before we actually started writing. You kind of put the title of that one first, Or did you come up a good story? First? We had the story first, but the title came like that. Yeah, I'm super proud of that book. That book is like, That is our heart. It's my favorite, My favorite book of yours. I love it. It's such a good buddy, you and so And that's what they call high concept. I think that's one of the things I like about your books. Is a lot of Mara, you know, create three. Inception is high concept. It's it's fresh, it's new, and that's I think has who comes up with that. I mean, is it mine? Who's the genius of the two? Because those are really great ideas. Well, first of all, I want to say thank you because you are a legend. So that's a really, really nice thing for you to say. And I'm gonna, like, fall asleep with that word, that sentence in my head. But, you know, the nice thing is that sometimes Christina has the idea, and we we riff off of it. And sometimes I have the idea and we riff off it. And it's like I think this works because it is such a equal partnership, both in terms of personality and contribution. And, you know, I mean, we talked a lot about this, but the friendship always comes first. We built this friendship after we started writing together, but I mean, she is my best friend. She is my business partner, and, um, her happiness and her well being matters so much more to me than anyone. Book. So I think because we have that we have that trust, you know, we always want toe, like, do our best for each other, right?...

So sure, and there's never any ego because we're Christina Lauren. We're not Christina and Lauren. So when we're working, it's really like we have, like, we're raising a child together or, you know, we're married and these air, all of our kids. It really is about this thing that were built. But we're also very careful toe have time. That is just friend time. That is not, you know, we're not really talking about books. And so I think that's why we're really lucky that we can take a weekend or a week toe outlined a book because we'll be watching a movie and then go Oh, I have an idea, you know? So, yeah, does that parlay into the business side as well? Because one of the things I would think you know I love you say you're each other's best friend. I think that's that's really touching and that you have such a successful career on top of that. So, um, there might be, I'm sure there are moments. Even amongst best friends were creatively There's a little Oh, no, I don't quite agree with that, but you've obviously worked through that, but I'd be curious how that works on the page or you call up on the phone. But also in the business sense. How do you handle Ah business between best friends? E. Go ahead. Well, I was just going to say we're so lucky in terms of the money piece because I feel like we have a similar approach and philosophy where it's like we both want Thio pay for the things we have to pay for and get the money, the thing for the things that we're owed. But we don't sweat the small stuff, right? S I think that the business piece were both were responsible in the same way and were laid back in the same way. So I think that fits on Ben. Also, when you're collaborating with somebody, you just have to learn how they need to hear feedback, right? People really straight. Some people want it kind of sandwiched in a compliment. Some people need a lot of praise. Some people don't like it just it just depends. So can we do? We do argue, um, low sometimes because people, that's the big question. Everybody always wants to know if we fight and we're like, Oh, what's we dio remember those saying I would not want to be in a relationship with somebody where we didn't argue because that means that you're not being honest. That means that you're just saying yes and no, you know, to everything. Um, but it's funny because the disagreements are never about the book. They're always like getting on each other's nerves or, you know, something like that. It's never it's never about if there is, if there is ever anything we disagree on, like if I don't If I disagree, um, something I will say. And low usually knows like I'm usually like. Okay, yeah. Yep. Because you know, she always say Low is the one who, like, keeps this train going because she, like, keeps our schedule. She she always knows what's happening. I'm writing the wrong names and books. It's a A, but usually there's a problem.

It's because somebody is not on the same page like is not caught up on an outline. Something has changed. Has for gotten It's 90% me. Eso It's never about because, like I said, we're Christina Lauren. We're not Christina and Lauren when we're writing, so there's never any ego about me being right or her being right. It's always for the best of the book. That's a great answer. Well, that I can see why you're so successful. It makes me think of a really successful ban or duo right the way describing your relationship. Then usually the way you hear authors describe their relationship and I love it because it's making me think about strong writers, right? Like if that's your refined, better guitar. Uh, yeah, it takes work. It definitely takes work. I mean, I think we have had to put in effort in our in our relationship Thio, make sure that we're being good communicators and we're being good partners, you know? And I mean, it helps that we only ever really wrote professionally together so that that's all we know. I think it would have been harder if we both came in with, like, individual careers and egos and all of that. But I think it does take work. You know, we have something priority. I also think that it helps that we started out writing fan fiction because that is such a collaborative thing. Everybody, like, reads everybody and edits everybody, and you know all of that. So, um, it just came natural. Tufts, try like, wow, what a great CEO figure out. You're your individual strengths and weaknesses, like which one of you is better than one element Or did that just kind of click right away? And have you kind of moved more into that as you've written together for longer? I mean, I've always known that if there's a scene that we want, that if there's a scene where somebody's heart needs to be completely ripped out or we need to feel everything they're feeling, I will 100% you like that is low. That is totally le You know, we knew early on that, like what we like to write and what it seemed like. We were good at writing, but I think we've learned to articulate that better over time. Christine is very good with setting a scene like showing a landscape kind of putting us in a place in the book, making you really feel like you're there with them. And I think we both really love writing dialogue. But yeah, I mean, we both you know, we both like writing for each other, and that kind of takes some of the pressure off, too, because I think if I pretend like this book is only going to be read by Christina, it makes it a lot easier to write it than if this book is going to be read by, you know, Mary Alice Munro, R E. Because you know how it is. You guys are writers, you know, it's like the pressure of thinking about somebody important reading it. Um, it's a lot easier if I just write it for Christina.

Yeah, you make me want to do a collaborative effort. You make it sound so cool. E. But there's there's a question we love to ask every guest we have on the show. We ask it every week. And that question is this. What were the values around reading and writing in your childhood households? We're always interested in how that has shaped the writer that you are today. Um, well, I grew up a very poor kid, Onda One place that I could go and dio whatever I wanted and get whatever and be like a big you know, High roller was at the library S o I. That's what I did was I read like almost every book and like my school library, that was, you know, my age group. Um, my mom was a big romance reader. We had just like bookshelves that were just full of used books from the You Know, like Nikola Quarter Everything and Barbara Cartland and all of those. And, you know, I just grew up watching her read two books a day sometimes e um, I was raised by parents who met in graduate school UC Berkeley. And so when they found that they had a romance loving daughter, they were like a little horrified. E think, think this love that I read, you know? I mean, my were always reading books. My dad loved science fiction fantasy. My mom was a big lit, thick lover. She's she still reads like crazy, like probably three books a week. And so I would take my allowance and I would go to the used bookstore and by Danielle Steel, and my mom would just like she would rather it, you know, she would be like, Okay, like, as long as you're reading. So I think you know, just having that that freedom. Thio read what it was that made us want to read. And I try and do that with my kids too, you know? Yeah. So that's wonderful. Are your kids big, big readers, Both sets of your kids? My child is now. What's that? Would you say, Christina, my daughter is 19 in college. On Dshea is not, She says that reading for school has sort of ruined or like love of comics and books and stuff. But she's never been a huge reader, and I remember there was a time where people would ask me if she read our books and I would just laugh because she is not a kissing book reader. Bythe well, took my daughter 10 years to read a novel of mine E. Yeah, I have a 13 year old son and he reads anything he confined and my daughter's. She's in a graphic novels, and she likes those she sent. She's tense, but my son has read a few of our books. He snuck them at first, and I was like, You know, and I mean not not the early ones. Early ones. They're a little racier, but the later ones e. I honestly think like I would rather him learned romance from romance written by...

...women. Right then, Uh oh, wow, that's a big point. Very. It's not a right that sense where it's abusive against women at all. No, exactly. And I told him. Like, Listen, I'm okay with you doing this As long as you talk to me, if you have questions, right, if you have questions about anything you read, you can always feel safe coming to me. And I think he does. So it's good. Another thing we like to do on the show every week is have our guests give us a writing tip, and I'm so interested to hear yours because I just have such respect for the career both of you have built. Do you have a writing tips you could give us tonight? Good. I'm going to say run your own race. Whether that be other authors or your co author, my co author is very fast and very good. Um, and it's easy to sort of be down on myself for being slower, but everybody has to realize that they have their own process, and you just have to go with it. Brains aren't easily just changed. That's right. Yeah, Easy in this in this business, um, to feel competitive or feel like you are raising someone else. That's such great advice. So simple, but so meaningful. Yeah. Yeah. How about you, Lauren? Um Well, I have two, but they're small. I guess one would be to You can't edit until you right? And so you just have to write. We always tell ourselves to right now and edit later. Even if it's terrible, you can always fix it sometimes with Christine and I, we have written a book completely wrong. We had to rewrite it, but at least now we know how not to do it, you know, and it's informative, Um, but also I have a few friends who really want to write a book, and they're like, But I'm just so busy and I'm like, Well, you either write it or you don't, so you have time for it, So I think that that is my advice is, don't make excuses to just sit down. If you want to write a book, you have to write the book. You're right, even if you're busy and even if it's 30 minutes or 60 minutes a day or whatever the words add up eventually, that's such a good you know that that goes even if you're feeling stuck. If you're an established writer and you're feeling stuck, sometimes you just have to write garbage and like, forgive yourself for writing garbage, you know, like you can fix it or you can delete it all. But at least you've done something that moves you forward somehow. So way tell each other that is better than perfect. Yeah, that's true. That's true. And I just feel like sometimes you have to write that garbage to get to the good stuff. You know what I mean? Like, it's about to you, because otherwise it's just in there and it's not It's not good. Absolutely. Can't fix what ain't there. Yeah, it's true. And I mean, do you all find, too, that sometimes you think about your characters? You've been living in their heads for a while, but you don't totally know them until you start writing that E. Oh, yeah, you're getting to know them like a weight. That first chapter is trash. I have...

...thio well, and they, like, evolved past a point that you thought they were going to. And you're like, Well, this story is not gonna end the way I thought because she's a really different woman than she wasn't the beginning E. When I'm in that garbage time, I always say e seeing it out of the corner of my eye like I see this story, but it's right over here and I can't see it. You got to keep writing till you tell you it's done being in the corner of your eye and it's and that's so true, Patty, That stresses me out, though, because I feel like I wanna grab it and I don't trust that it will stay there like I always worry that it'll go away and I'll have to like I don't know That's such a good way of saying it. E you have the garbage part with just that it's not really clicking and then it's clicking and you're going. You're like, Oh my God, you start that right away. Why didn't I started earlier? Why didn't I? Because it's so much fun when it's rolling and it really is. Why did I agonize so much? You have to go through that. Yeah, I think you dio Yeah, just keep reminding me that we just started a book and I'm like, Do I even know how to do this way? What am I doing? Yeah. Weii, Exactly way also love to give book recommendations on the show because it's so nice to shout out other authors and and give other people great ideas of things to read Thio, either. If you have a book you read, I mean, obviously our books. I clearly read the entire friends and fiction catalog and their way actually have. Do you have anything you've read recently that you'd like to recommend? Um, eso well played came out today. It's by Gen. DeLuca. She had a book out. Steer Caldwell met. It's a Renaissance fair romance. It's really cute. It's kind of an enemies to lovers, and it's just a ton of fun and so well played as when I just started today, and I just I love her voice. I think she's really fun, and, um, it's different, like there aren't a lot of Renaissance fair romances, and so I enjoy that one a lot, So that would be American nation. Eso I. I've been on a thriller kick lately, so I read my lovely Wife by Samantha Downing, and I loved it so much I didn't see any of it coming, but I'm reading the guest list by Lucy Foley, and it is so beautifully written. Yeah, There are just a, uh, e really good e. Some, like this'll is actually just a test to see if Lauren can complete your sentences for, like, how are they? What was she gonna...

...say? Lauren E. Well, I know that she's She's really into the wedding guests and she's really into high. She's hard e and I don't know no. And you're like, I really enjoy thrillers e waving in one right now Way lost you when you were saying it's beautifully written. Did you would have beautifully written there some. So I'm descriptions that they're just so gorgeous. I actually would like call low and tell her she's unsure. Just love. Step's awesome. That's actually on my cute my my list on the library. So I'm really looking forward to reading that. What? I'm glad you're liking it. That's awesome. Well, ladies, this has been so much fun. These these bonus ones always feel like they go by too quickly. Is there anything else you wanted to mention before we kind of go into our little closing and talk about the bookstore again? We just want to thank you for having us. We love all of you. So much. And we're really grateful that you include us tonight. I'm really looking forward to reading your holidays, because just what I need right now. I needed a good help, you know? Absolutely. Just then. Well, so thank you all out there for joining us tonight and thank you. Of course, for joining us. Christina and Lauren. It was such a pleasure to have you. We hope that all of you out there watching we'll check out in the holidays. Like we said on Wednesday. If there's any year to begin all the joy of the holiday season a little bit early 2020 don't you think? S remember, Bethany Beach Books has our new releases, including in the holidays, on sale for 10% off this week with coupon code. We love F N F 2020 and we always encourage you to shop local to support these great independent businesses that support readers, writers and book lovers everywhere. So anything else? Anybody just all happy? Oh, good luck with the new book. And thank you so much for being with us. That is a wrap for our latest friends and fiction. Behind the book bonus. Enjoy the rest of your Sunday Happy New Year. To those of you celebrating and good night, you've been listening to the friends and fiction podcast. Be sure to subscribe to the friends and fiction podcast wherever you listen, and if you're enjoying it, leave a review. You can find the friends and fiction authors at w w, w dot friends and fiction dot com A swell As on the Facebook group page, friends and fiction come back soon. Okay? There are still lots of books writing tips, interviews, publishing news and bookstores to chat about goodbye.

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