Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 8 months ago

Friends & Fiction with Colleen Hoover

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Meet #1 NYT bestselling publishing phenom Colleen Hoover! The author of 22 novels and novellas including runaway smash hit bestselling novels like IT ENDS WITH US and VERITY, joins us to discuss her meteoric rise, her writing process, her social media presence, and how living in her Texas hometown keeps her humble even in the face of having four of her books perched on the NYT bestseller list at the same time. Find out what's next for Colleen, hear about movie news on some of her most beloved books, and all about her latest novel REMINDERS OF HIM in this fun and warm interview. Then Ron Block joins the after show to reveal the "March Madness" slate of incredible guests comig up on the F&F Writer's Block Podcast.

Welcome to friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Christen Hermel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callighan Henry are for longtime friends, with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insighter talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi everybody, it's Wednesday night and that means it's time for friends and fiction. It's the happiest hour on the Internet and we are so grateful that you have chosen to spend your time with US tonight. I'm Christy Woodson Harvey Him Mary Kay Andrews. I'm Christen Hermel, and this is friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories, to support independent bookstores, authors and Librarians. Tonight we will be talking with the one and only colly and hooper. Our Patty had a prior engagement with her Alma matern tonight, so she sends you all her love. She wants me to say War Eagle, but my mouth can only say go heels. So sorry, Patty, but she'll be back next week. The show is partially brought to you by our presenting sponsor, Charleston Coffee Roasters. Charleston coffee roasters painstakingly searches the world over for the highest quality coffee beans. They bring them home to Charleston, South Carolina, where slow roasting coaxes out their unique flavors and, along with their promise of great coffees at Charleston Coffee Roasters also pledges to help our planet and local communities, which we love. Globally, they support sustainable farming practices and locally, they partner with the South Carolina Sea Turtle Rescue Program Visit Their website, Charleston Coffee Roasterscom, and use the code coffee with friends, no saces, coffee with friends to get twenty percent off on all bagged coffees. Also, I believe we have a winner to announce. Lisa and Brenda ran a giveaway last week over on the book club page. Drum Roll Please, oh or or computer people, I know what are we doing? I know. So the winner is Cheryl Bostick from spanaway Washington. Cheryl was chosen at random for more than two hundred and fifty entrance. She will receive a Charleston Coffee roasters coffee gift pack valued at thirty five dollars. So congratulates. Congratulations, Cheryl bustick. Yeah, and tonight we're thrilled to bring back our pals page one books as a presenting sponsor. The page one I know, we're so bad have them back. I can pone book subscription provides the personal touch of an Indie book store with a delight and surprise of an online subscription service curated just for you. The literary matchmakers at page one books hand select books just for you based on your preferences and their knowledge. Had page one books. You are more than an algorithm. Shop now at page one BOOKSCOM. That's page the number one books dotcom. Choose. There are three, six or twelve month subscription plan. The gift of page one is always a custom fit. And now you can get fifteen percent off all book subscriptions with Code Friends. All caps, fifteen and so yeah, is that the number one like what calling hoover always is on the New York Times best seller list by number one. Yeah, actually, like the actually should just not be called the New York Times best seller list anymore, to just be like what calling for this week? Yeah, okay, just checking. Just amazing. As you know, we encourage we continue to encourage you to support independent booksellers when and where you can. We wherever you want to buy callings books is fin us, and one way you can do that, besides visiting page by bugs, is to visit our friends and fiction bookshop dotorg page, where you can find callings books and books by the four of us in our past guests at a discount. We also want to remind you that both Christie and Mary Kay, these two lovely ladies here, have a brand new books coming out in the next couple of months. So Christie's the Wedding Vale will be out March twenty nine. Which Christie, when is that? Just like for weeks and for weeks, and for my guy, my got panicking, like I have to start packing for two or them. Oh, I can't delete it. I feel like we've been talking about it for so long and it's finely here about the real right backs this week. Oh that's so exciting and Mary Kay's the home wreckers will be out just a few weeks later on May third. Of course, both books are available wherever books are sold, but if you want...

...a hand signed first edition of both books, hand signed first edition, you guys. It's amazing. Plus a little free gift, you could order the spring box from our friends at independent book store Oxford Exchange. I was actually just there on Sunday. We Love them so much. You'll receive a beautiful delivery of both books, each of them signed, as we said, as soon as they're released, and we really encourage you to pick this up if you can. If you know, if you watch the show and you love the show, you know these ladies put so much of their time and their effort into into what you see on screen here every week, so this would be plus. The books are just amazing, so we know you want to read them and get autograph copies. Yea. Thank you, Christen. Well, we know a lot of you have were been participating and our very first friends and fiction reading challenge, as have the four of us, and this month we are encouraging you to read a book about a female historical figure and if you're looking for a way to keep track of these books and your other reading. We'd love to recommend our beautiful reading journal, designed by US and conjunction with another favorite independent bookstore, Oxford. Exchange it as a gorgeous Blue Lennon cover, a Taral blue cover, I might have picked that. I'm plenty of space to record your thoughts on what you're reading. Okay, so now let is get to this main event, our guests calling hoover. But before we do we have a special sneak peak for you of Christie's brand new book trailer for the Wedding Bale. You know we love to share our special first with you here before they go anywhere else. Hope you enjoy Shaun. Play it, Christie, that's beautiful. I had a gateful blur by one I favorite authors, Kristen Harm O. I love this book so much and I'm so excited for everyone else out there to get to read your first historical contemporary novel on March Twenty Nine, and of course we hope everyone out there will preorder. Christie, can you give us a little glimpse into what we can expect from the Wedding Vale Super Briefly and we'll get into colleen, but I'm this is a story about four generations of women and a family heirloom that has a connection to the Vanderbilt family and and I'll tell you the rest and a couple of weeks on the show. So let's welcome our guest for the evening, calling humor. Calling is the Number One New York Times best selling author of ever twenty novels and Novellas. Her work falls into the new adult and young adult contemporary romance categories as well as psychological thriller. She writes amazingly all across the board. She's sort of above it beyond categories. Calling good she won a good reads choice award for Best Romance for three consecuctive years, from two thousand and fifteen to two thousand and seventeen, for her novels confess. It ends with US and without merit. Her novel confess was filmed as a series by awestruck and is available on prime video via I Amazon at itunes. Calling also founded the bookworm box, which is a charity subscription service and bookstore with her family in two thousand and fifteen. All profits from the subscription service are donated to various charities each month and to date the book worm box has donated over one million dollars to help those indeed, she's just amazing. How cool is that? Colling's new novel, reminders of him, was just released in January and she recently announced a long anticipated sequel to her novel it ends with us, called it starts with us, which will be released in October of this year. All right, Sean, bring her on it. Welcome. We're so glad to have you here and we and our audience have been so excited to host you tonight. Thanks, thanks for having me. I'm super excited to be here in the presence of such wonderful writers. It can I just say how funny it is Christy years and Mary case books on their side by side. It's like the wedding bill and then the whole records. Awesome. It's barks with us and it ends with us. I really I had to do a listic all today. I like the worst wedding gifts and I was like, what are the worst wedding gifts, and I was like maybe, like you know, you're the book that got you through your divorce or something. So that is awesome. Well, I love that. Could you tell us a little bit about your latest runaway hits, which I just devoured. Reminders of him. Yeah, so reminders of him is a...

...book I wrote last year or the year before, I can't really remember, honestly. It's a woman named Kenna who, you know, made some mistakes in her life and recently got out of prison and is trying to start over and wants to be reunited with her daughter, and I think I might have written it when I probably was in a quarantine move. It's a very sad book, it is. It is a sad bug, but it's also just wonderful. Okay, telling it's my turn to ask questions, for is yours, very kid, all right, calling one of the many, many guinous things you did, and reminders of him is you create a massive ethical dilemma in which they're oh, so many shades of gray, and we're not talking about those other shades are gray not. This dilemma affects every so single character in the novel and it keeps. The page is flipping and as those pages flip, the reader can't help but shift his or her alliances. Now, without giving way too much, what was the initial spark for this novel? What made you. Besides quarantine, want right Kenna and Ludger's story. Um, you know, it's interesting that you put it the way you put it about, you know, kind of shifting loyalties. When I right, my goal always is to play double's advocate. I I love playing double's advocate and I love doing that when I right, kind of making reader's route for someone they don't necessarily think they'll root for. And and that's really the start of all of the books, when I go into them, is trying to find something where I'm like, okay, what what can I write about and how can I write about it from a point of view that I don't necessarily always see things from? And I think with Kennon Ledger's story I had just came off the hills of writing heartbones and ended that with someone kind of dealing with the prison system and then I got a loose idea of how I wanted to write about a woman coming out of the prison system. My little sister is really big into prison reform and was in college and working on our master's degree, and so we had a lot of discussions about it and while the book doesn't go into that, I think that it was just an interest of mine at the time when I got the idea of the book. Okay, do you you said your little sister is very much into prison reform, but do you think your own background and social work plays a role in your these come really emotional and complex stories about human nature and the joy I do. I think that. You know, I worked as a social worker for several years before I started writing books and I think we always put a little piece of ourselves into our books and you know some of what we've learned. But I think a lot of the reason why I went into social work is because I was interested in and helping people and seeing the other side of things, and so I don't know how much of and influence it it has, but definitely I think that there's always a little bit of that in there. Yeah, that makes sense. Yeah, it definitely does. I'm going just going to remind our audience out there that if you have a question for colleen, feel free to drop it in the chat and we will be pulling some audience questions and just a minute. But one of the things that really sort of strikes me about your career, as I feel like you know, you hear this phrase like meteoric rise, but that's a really spot on description, I feel like, for your career. I mean you have had a meteoric rise. We really have. So we're going to get out our pencils in our paper and we were just going to see if you could like just tell us what to do. Screw it, that's all. Yeah, they're a JOKYA. Just think it's so nobody, like I'm somebody. Yeah, regard us. Yeah, well, yeah, now just getting but in all seriousness, like take us back a little bit. How did your writing career begin? And when you look back now, do you feel like there was like a turning point where everything just like exploded for you, or do you feel like it was more like little about little? I definitely feel like I view my career very differently than other people do. When I've wrote my first book, it was I released it back in two thousand and twelve. I had zero expectations. So when that book start of, you know, hitting readers kindles and when it hit the New York Times, I was kind of in a state of disbelief and that hasn't stopped. Yeah, you know, for me the fact that that first this book hit The New York Times, like I was...

...so blown away and thought, okay, it can't get better than this. I'm at the top, it's you know, I'm he from here. But things just kept happening and kept happening and and I don't know when it ends with US released and I think it was two thousand and sixteen. It hit the New York Times for two weeks. I think I thought, like that's the best this book is ever going to do, like it was better than I ever imagined and I honestly thought like, okay, that was a huge success. I had no, no idea that what has happened in this past year could even happen, you know, and so I think I've just been in a state of disbelief and I don't know that I've really accepted it yet. It's it's just one of those things where, like my whole career, I feel like I am a writer who has come across a lot of luck and good timing and I haven't really paid my dues, if that makes sense. So there's a lot of guilt there with the success. So yeah, well, you're certainly using your success for good. So I don't think it out there. Oh my goodness, you're so generous with everything that you do and if we being on here with us tonight's I think. But yeah, wow, it's really it's really incredible to watch. So we're going to ask you for a writing tip and just a little bit, and we know will all be sharpening our pencils for that, but if you were going to give a piece of advice to like a new writer, or maybe like three, you know, not so new writers, on the marketing side of things, do you have tests for people who are looking to grow their audiences? You know, that's one thing that I I like. I hit a million followers on instagram this week and zy it's crazy, like, I don't. I wish that I had tips, but I don't, like I just don't pay for marketing. I don't do things like that. I'm just myself, like I I've had my social media since before I wrote my first novel, and back then I was silly, I was myself. I shared embarrassing stories about my kids, about myself, and I feel like I've kept that up. You know, I've really not changed anything. I don't allow anyone to touch my social media. I don't have a social media manager, like I still everyday log on do it all myself. That's why I don't get a lot done anymore all. But I don't know, I've just retained this sense of control with it and I think that's actually helped that it's still authentically me and I think that if I were to have let someone else control it or, you know, hired out, it would feel like a commercial. And I think that's where some people go wrong, is is their page starts to feel like there's a disconnect there between the person behind it and and the audience and it just becomes like a commercial. And I just don't want that to happen to my pages and I know that I don't like to follow pages like that. So I guess if I had to give advice, it would be just be yourself and and try to, you know, give readers pieces of you, not just your books all the time. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I love that. That's great advice. So, colleen, in a recent interview with Glamor, you had this great quote. They asked you about what makes a good story and you said, I have no idea. It's like that. I don't love it. You said it's like math how every person can get to the same answer using a different method. But it's like that with each book I write. I don't have a method, I don't have steps or rules I follow. I just somehow make it from the beginning to the end by the skin of my teeth and hope I get it right. So we love that answer so much, except obviously for the math part, because we know we don't like that about we try to avoid math as much as we can at a daily pieces. But we totally relate with so relate to that. So I guess I'm just wondering. So recently, I know you shared it a picture of your office with Post. It's on a white board and I guess I'm just thinking, what is your process? Can you talk us through a little bit about how you formulate a book? Yeah, so the reason for the posts? I don't do that with every book. I didn't. I am with this books I'm writing and starts with us right now, and there are even just the tiniest sentences in the first this book that I've got to go and make sure that that timeline matches up with the second book and think the characters that in the first book match up with the second book. And so it's a lot more tedious to me. I think, like trying to write a sequel and having to make sure you have every everything right going into that one. And so I look a lot more organized than I usually am, because normally, like, I write standalone, so I don't do a lot of series or sequels. Hey and my Sandalos, my standalonees, I kind of go into with one, one...

...little thing, like it might be the title, it might be the plot twist, it might be something I like about a character, it might be a scene that I'm going to write, but I usually just start with one thing and then and then build the story in the outline around something that I know I want in the book. My outlines are hot mess and they don't make sense to anyone but me. They sometimes are longer than the books themselves. Like I write of Morow ever use but you know, yeah, to me it's like sometimes I'll write, you know, five chapters worth of stuff and end up only using one scene of that in the in the actual book. But I have to write a lot of stuff I'm not going to use in order to get to what I am going to use. Okay, and I think that's where a lot of writers struggle because they think, oh, this thing I put down on paper. You know, they don't get very far past the first chapter of trying to write their first book because they think they have to use that and if they don't like it, they're hard on themselves and give up. But I'm telling you, like, sometimes you have to write a lot of grab to get to something worth even. Yeah, yeah, that absolutely makes sense and and it's I mean obviously your process is working, because these books draw readers in so deeply and we feel these characters. And you know, I'm midway through reading verity now. Don't tell me what happens. I'm wondering what it was like to write. I'm I guess I'm just interested in this in particular because, of course two of the main characters, verity and Lowen, are both writers. So what was that like to write these writer characters? As a writer yourself, is there any piece of your own writing journey that has kind of become a part? Hope, you know, maybe a verity. I mean that, not a variety of low and, because I feel like we're seeing so much of their writing and folks for sure with low and, I felt like I put a lot of my own journey into her story. I don't know that I can relate to verity a ready. I'm just probably a good thing, but yeah, definitely low and, like I thought, it's been a while since I wrote that book, but I remember one part where she was talking about marketing and advertising and how she just isn't good at that because she hates telling people like Hey, read this book. It's great that that was me, like I hate that more than any thing. I hate happened to talk positively about my books, mainly because I'm my own worst critic and if I'm going to be honest, I'm going to tell my readers I don't know if you should read this one. How I am like, I'm not very good at self promotion, and neither was lowe. That is true. That's a really great that is hard, though, and I don't know about you guys, but I feel like it's one of those things that at the beginning I just could not and then you just starting. He had to get used to it, and I mean then you become Mary Kay and have Hashtag by my book, Damn it, and then that's all you need to do. It's shoe it's like that's just an inserting part of your personality. It makes it fun and it brings that monotony. I love that. Yeah, I think, and I think I don't know about everybody else, but raised women who were raised in the south were told that it's bad manners to tell to put ourselves forward, and it's it's just not done. Yeah, and I's talk about your accomplishments and people won't like you if you're a successful and which you know, and it's hard to overcome that. I think it is that that in that instinct to say I'm not good enough, you know well, and if you're already fighting imposter syndrome and Colle and you've been pretty for you forthcoming about that. Yeah, that's something I struggle with. I don't know how you struggle with it when you own the New York Times best sellers right. I feel like it's worse. I feel gets it's so much worse because I have four books on the New York Times of best seller list. But in my head I'm like, why do I have one on there? Now I have four. It's like four times the imposter syndrome. I don't know. Like you know, grateful doesn't cut it. I we're all so great that for everything that happens, but it doesn't take away that that Imposter Syndrome and that guilt and that feeling of you don't belong. I don't know. That's the fish and that many minute now they're going to pull the rug out from underneath you and an armored truck is going to pull up and say we need the money back right now. Yeah, that's true. This is the book where we realize that you actually are not a writer. We're sorry. Yeah, I just waiting for that. Yeah, there's been a mistake. We're sorry. Okay. Well, as expected, we have about a million reader questions coming in for you, so we are going to try to get through as many of those as we can. So may heay. You want to get US started?...

Yeah, Kristen Ness airs asks calling. Did you release your first book on your own or did you use a traditional publisher? And I think that's a question a lot of people want to know. Having answered so, I did go indie on my first novel. I did all myself, did my own editing, my own horrible coverage design, and I have done several since then. I released a book a year and a half ago. That was self published. I do both. I enjoy both. I think that there are positive and negatives to both, but I'm a huge advocate for self publishing for sure. That's awesome. All right. We have a question from Cindy Joe Riddle Thunderberg, who says, how did colleen get involved in Tick Tock? Lots and lots of readers have been acquired. They're very exciting. Okay, this is where I think some misunderstanding comes in. I have like like that. The reason why my books saw the success they did on tick tock was something I did. was absolutely nothing I did. Was All book talkers, people that were suddenly into reading during quarantine. I I've had tick tock since before it was tick Tock. It used to be called musically, like back into like two thousand and fifteen, and I have this I have this toxic trait of anytime there's a new social media platform, I have to go claim my name, even if I platform or it never takes off. So I claimed my name on musically and then it kind of got grandfathered over to tick Tock and so I you know, I've been putting up tick tock videos for like four or five years now, maybe once or twice a year, and and none of them really ever have to do with my books. Like over there, I had about two thousand followers and I was just posting videos, mostly with my youngest kid, because he loves tick Tock. Of but then when quarantine happened, I started noticing I was getting more and more followers and and then it just blew up over there and it wasn't any video I did. It was just, I really think quarantine people, you know, not being able to go to works. It made a whole lot of new readers and tick tock is what took off at the time and and my books just happened to be some of the books that were talked about in the beginning of that. So it wasn't really anything that I did, I just I just benefited from it. Okay, I'll be right back. I got to sign up for tick tock exactly. I love it. Carrie settlement, this is a good one and it says has your fame change how you live your life? I think y'all would be so shocked how much the same our lives are. You know, I still live in the same town, I still live on the same land where we like when I wrote my first book, I lived in a single by trailer with my husband and three kids, and right now we still live on that same plot of land, just in a bigger house. Yeah, we nothing is changed really. Of course. You know, I don't have to dig in the couch cushions for Change, so that's nice. But I think that's why I love it, because I was born and raised in this town and no one treats me any differently. No one thinks I'm special, and so I you know, I stay humbled here because because of that, and I don't know, I just I just love it here. And my kids say don't care. My kids could could not care less about the book world and everything that's happening. They treat me like mom. So you know, every day when I'm online and I'm like, well, I have a million followers, who are the first ones to just bring me back down and not. It's unbelievable how they'll do that. Right, three teenage boys. It is is fun. Not all teenagers anymore. My oldest is twenty one now. I laughed like I was crying I was laughing so hard at you doing the thing about the reader saying that they couldn't believe that your son was allowed to read verity and you're like twenty one. Like I think about how you look so young. I was so thank you for that rabbit hole, for an area that was gonna stick. It has stuck. Like last week when I went to have lasick surgery, the eye, the eye place that I got my Lasi surgery done, did a picture of me and two of my kids and they said a mother and her two sons did lasick surgery. Well, my readers went on that page and left hundreds of comments of like, how dare you call her their mother, that she's obviously too young to be their mother, and they're all kidding right. Well, this is lacenick company is going in and like apologizing to people, going we're sorry, she we thought she was the mother books. It's just that...

...follows me everywhere and it's greatest thing. It's awesome. All right, we're you know, we got so many questions. We're going to do another round because kway and people have all these pin up questions for you. Yeah, yeah, Charletne Keller wants to know. She's watching on Youtube. What are some of your Goto authors. And favorite. And what are your favorite genres to read? I think my favorite genre to read right now is contemporary romance. I'm kind of new to the genre. I was not a romance reader before I wrote my first book and I just read a lot of true crime and biographies. I don't know what was wrong with me. I don't know why I hadn't picked up romance yet, but so since I started writing it like I cannot get enough of it. So it really anything. That's usually new releases. I just gobbled them up in the especially in kindle unlimited. Right now I'm on a Christina Lauren kick I just got. We Love Them. We have this. Yeah, I just got their newest in the mill. I'm taking them on the heath with me. I can't wait. And Emily Henry, oh my gosh, so good. So yeah, Definitely Contemporary Romance. It's awesome there's so many people writing such great contemporary romance these days and I's named two of our favorites. That's awesome. All right. We have a yeah coment from Wendy long saying I love how real you are on social media, which we just talked a little bit about. But she's a great question. She says. Have you always been so comfortable in your own skin? Yes, I love that. I don't get embarrassed. I don't. I don't know if that's something that stopped happening once I turned like thirty five forty, but I just nothing really embarrasses me anymore, and I don't know if that comes with age or if it's just come with me just being very comfortable with myself. But yeah, I what you see is what you get. Twenty four seven, it's sometimes I don't know if that's a good thing, but it is a good thing. That's awesome, Jen and Ryan wants to know can you explain but bananza to people who are not familiar with it? Oh, I would love to so. Book Bonanza is a signing that is put on by our charity, the book worm box, and it takes place at the Gay Lord and Dallas every year. We've had to cancel the last couple of years because of covid but we have about two hundred and fifty authors and two thousand readers. It's a huge event. We haven't had one since two thousand and nineteen, so we're itching to get back in and we're doing it this year in July, eighth, the ninth. So yeah, any authors that are interested email us. I should know the email address offhand. I think it's Bonanza at the book worm boxcom. So you know we'd love to sign up authors and we and all the money goes to charity. So last year, well, for two thousand and nineteen, the donations went to build a school in Malawi and to I can't remember the name of it. So I'm not going to say where the other donations went because I will be wrong. Well, I I will not be able to hold my head up if I don't ask Cathy All's question, because she is our managing director, bag Walker's mom, and want to piss off men calling. If you ever tour? I do have it in a while because of covid and I miss it so much, but I usually do really long tours. I know, with my age or releases, sometimes I would do twenty to thirty states or cities. Yeah, I haven't toured since January of two thousand and twenty, though, and I don't have a book coming out until October. But I feel like by the time October hints I might I might be comfortable doing maybe a week long tours so hopefully all well. Dallas from Letfield books message to me yesterday and tell me to tell you that they really want you to come there. It's a fast literary luncheon. We're all about it. I should get Charlene Keller is wondering will colleen be writing another thriller like Verity? I am, I, I'm I haven't started it yet because I'm finishing up this other book right now, but it's the next book I'm writing. I'm doing a thriller for Grand Central and I think it's going to happen like a fall two thousand and twenty three release if I turn it in on time. So don't hold me to that date. Yea. Hopefully, hopefully, that will work out. I forgot that you were with Grand Center and I have Karen Costell Nick, don't you? Yes, that's she edited two and...

...my books in like two thousand and eight and two thousand and nine. She's wonderful. I love her. Yeah, she's. Grand Central's just been so great. Kind of all over the place. I have a contract with Montlake, which is an Amazon imprint, and then of course atria and then grand central. So yeah, I don't know what I was thinking. With all. They've all been wonderful, but grand central, like they announced today that they're putting out verity and hardcover this fall. I said her yeah, and that one was actually an Indie book that I did, a two thousand and eighteen, and I just recently sold it to grand central back in October. So my little sister, who was a cover designer, did the did the original design for verity and then they went back to her, grand central did and let her do the hardcover design, something that was really awesome of them. That's super cool to fall with the gold and everything. It look great. Yeah, yeah, Megan. Is it Tabor? I can't see either song with you. Wants to know. Are you able to tell us anything about the movie adaptation of it ends with us? I wish I could. We I don't know anything. Like I feel like because of Covid you know, a lot of films got pushed back and I think that was one of them. That is taken a little longer than they anticipated. But as it stands right now they're still working on the script. So we are not into casting yet, even though I saw an article on buzz feed yesterday that said the casting was announced, that that wasn't true. That's news to me. One of them had Adam driver as one of the actors, which would be like a dream of mine. I love him, but it's not true. That's awesome. Well, calling, we love a good writing tip and it's always so fine to hear different advice from different authors. So would you menag hearing a quick writing tip with our viewers? Yeah, and I think a lot of people struggle with riders block and it's one of those things that I don't necessarily believe in. I believe in creative lulls and I don't really focus on rider's block very much. Like if I'm not feeling it to me as I'm just having a lull and it's okay to walk away from the computer and go watch TV. I got consume other forms of art when this happens, like I'll go watch TV, watch movies, read other books, Um, you know, anything to consume other people's art forms, and usually that sparks something in me to want to go back to my computer and right and sometimes those creative loves may last month or two, I don't know. But just don't be so hard on yourself if that happens to you. I think that some people, and it may just be your personality that you, if you're especially if you're tied by you, think I'll have to hit a word count every day. I have to do this. Don't be so hard on yourself. Creativity isn't something you can put on a, you know, on a schedule, so just walk away. Love that all right. We usually ask authors to give us a book suggestion and we would love that too, but there's a question in New York Times Book if you asks authors, and we like this coolly and Huber Book of You. I'm sorry, I actually called a pay old day the New York Times. I've got to calling Huber Review. Yes, so it. Would you mind telling US readers of the calling Hubor Book Review? But make me be surprised to find in your library. You're on your nightstands. Might you be surprised to be Oh gosh, I want to have some hooks back here. Well, if we wouldn't be surprised, it's fine. You can just whatever you're reading. I just started. You know, I said that I I like biographies. Yeah, this one is Andrew McCarthy. It's so good. A friend of mine went on and on about it and ended up mailing it to me because she was irritated that I was taken so long buying it. So that's what I'm reading right now, which is really good. I don't know, I'm just a sucker for biographies and documentaries. That's awesome. And Brabo Right, yeah, book TV. Anything wrong? All right, we'll call in if you and mind sticking around for just a couple minutes. We have one additional question for you, but first we have just a few quick reminders for everybody out there. Yeah, and just a quick reminder about our writers block podcast. Will always post links under announcements each time a new one drops. I just love saying that. I feel like I'm a I'm so hip. I'm not, I'm not now, I'm alla. Okay, I'm never going to get over saying that. Never, never, it'll be on my headstone. She said. A new episode of our podcast about this each Friday. On the last episode, Ron Talk to Jennifer Smith and Diana Ross Dad about entering chap, entering adulthood...

...day day use. And this week Ron and Christie will talk to one moment, let's gird our loins. They're going to tell we're going to talk to southern charms star Craig conover about his memoir pillow talk. So don't, don't forget to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. And while you were hitting those subscription buttons, make sure to subscribe to our newsletter and our youtube channel to so you'll never miss a thing. If you're connected with us both of those ways, you will be with US always. We're inescapable. You can also find selected back episodes on local plus, which is a new streaming platform that also includes lots of brand new content from other independent creators. And if you're not hanging out with us yet and the friends and fiction official Book Club, you're missing out. The group, which is separate from us but is run by our friends Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardner, is now more than elevenzero strong. Join them March twenty one, when they will be discovered discussing Christina Laurens, the soul made equation with carolling. Just mention what's awesome, and make sure to join us for our next episode of friends and fiction next years. Next let's saying like three words at the same time. Next Wednesday, right here at seven pm or we will welcome Lisa Bar and Erica Roebuck and Rachel McMillan will join us for the aftershow, and then on March sixteen will host, John Starles and Jessica strawster will join us for the after show. If you're ever wondering about our schedule, it's on our friends and fiction website and on the header graphic on our facebook page. And I get to ask the last question. Calling you are up. We always like to ask what were the values around reading and writing when you were growing up? That's a good question. I think the value that my mom always and stilled in us is to enjoy it. It was an ever, you know, presented to us like a chore, and I would just gobble up anything I could get my hands on. That was, to me, one of my biggest hobbies and I think my mom helped in still that in us. That's so great. Well, calling you have been such a great guess. We're so glad that you came tonight. Thank you for spending your time with us and we know that everybody in our audience was so thrilled to have you too, and we can't write to read the next book. I'll thank you all. This was so much fun. Truly, I would love to. Oh, please, anytime you. Yeah, thank you calling. Good night. Bye. Well, thank you to our presenting sponsors, Charleston Coffee Roasters and page one books, for their generous support. Show our sponsors some love by following them on facebook and instagram and subscribing to their email newsletters. Remember that you can use the code coffee with friends for twenty percent off bad coffees at Charleston Coffee Roasters, and the code friends fifteen for fifteen percent off book subscriptions at Page One. And make sure to stay tuned for our aftershow. And don't forget that you can find all of our back episodes on Youtube or re watch this one, which I am definitely going to be doing. prolling was amazing. We're live there every week, just like we are on facebook, and if you subscribe you won't miss the thing. Plus you'll have access to special short clips. Come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome Lisa Bar and Erica robot. Hey, this one tiny, oh, wait, wait, no, wait, no, this, yeah, aquin. Hello, Ron makes the killer Martini, we found out, and we can only hope that that's a coffee mug full of GIN as well. Like no, just boter, what a great guest. Wow, wasn't she good? Yes, and of course most of you know Ron Block, rock star Librarian who is also the host of our enormously popular writers block podcast, and we just had to ask him to come on tonight to chat about the podcast, because this month is so awesome sauce that we're calling it march madness and in our opinions, this version is way better than a bunch of grown men dripping balls and short pants at my right. Ladies, I kind of like marsh bad. Yeah, agreed that the podcast is better during during halftime, you can listen to the podcast. That's right, is your own way. Yeah, Christine faving, since Carolina is always a perpetual, you know, NCA powerhouse, she's never going to say basketball sucks. But anyway, Ron would you tell us what our version of March madness looks forward to? I can just blown away. We kind of sat down and put it all together for the that I was like, Oh my God, we are we it's march...

...madness. So you've already revealed that we are going to be talking. This Friday, Christie and I are going to drop an episode with Craig Conover from Pillow Talk. We had some of his book and he also is a star of southern charm. We were, and I think Christ you will agree, we were surprised how honest he is and how forthcoming he was about some real struggles in his life and how it was to mix the fame and things. We also got a little bit of early gossip about the new season of southern charms, so we're saying we're dead right. It was like a really dishy episode. I mean he did not hold back. We were asking him some light and it was like the more he was like being really honest. We're like well, that's ask him us. That's right, and he did his homework on all of us. To sorry, it was really interesting and see someone here was named his mother's favorite author. I'm not saying who, but tuned in to find out. I know on March Eleven Brad Meltzer was. I guess what a great sit down that wasn't when somebody that big and he's so giving and he's so kind and he's so nice, but when somebody answers a question by I've never told this story before. You know it's worth tuning in it's really good. Oh, I got it so good to you'd be so excited. I just think lures you in and you forget that they're actually likes thousands of people listening to you and you're like, well, I'm only going to tell you right. Yeah, just just like close friends. Yes, my close friends. And then on the eighteen we just we just recorded Mary K and I with Harlan Coben and so great. I have to tell you, I just a lot of it. I just kind of set back because it was about that's not true. Well, that's not true. You did all the hard work. But it was so amazing to watch, and it's one of my favorite things too, as a reader and the host, but to to writers talking about their craft. They told Great War stories. There's a lot of a lot of back and forth and maybe a couple of secrets that I didn't know about him that someone knew. I don't know. It's really, really good. I just remember. Oh, I can't remember what secret it was. Oh, that is really was it about his early book covers? Yeah, Oh my God, that was my favorite part of the whole thing. I was like I saw that on paper and I'm like, I don't know what she's doing with this question? No, Ron, it's my job to keep everyone guessing. No one else's one is always like what is what the Hell is she gonna do next? I love it. I love it. Next three, on the twenty five of March, there's a little known author that I, maybe a couple of you have heard of and I don't know. There's some big book coming up, but it's going to have author the wedding veil. I'm hoping that I about. I hoping I can, I could get some buzz going for this off there. You know, it's basically it's basically a pity booking wrong. It is kind it is. Do you know how many, how I mean how much, I had to beg to get on this podcast and how many like gifts that had to send and all the GIN? And I mean it was it was a few. Finally, after a few Kelly Kappelski's and Sanana, Ron, let me wait, what's up the FI point? What's up? What? What? What's a Kelly? A Kelly Kapowski? You were the other end of the table. Run. Can you please enlighten our audience as to what a Kelly Kapowski is? I can I wish I had a picture like right here to show you. It's a lovely cocktail. It started out is being called Kelly Kappowski's bath water, but we don't say that now because it's probably not so cool. She was a character on save by the bell and it's this lovely little Markarita, but it's done with orange blossom water and pair syrup and it's it comes out all beautiful pink and put a little edible flower in it. I'll make you one. I'll make one for okay, I must, but I'm super excited to come on the podcast and I found not one but to cut chapters. I think I'm just going to probably only have time to read one. Brilliant Sun is the best. Kabana boy serves drinks too. Well. We could be better. Yes, we're going to have some great surprises on the podcast with Christie. Maybe some exclusive content. I don't know. We U saying a duet. I don't know him. We really should do that. We really should. Yeah, we're telling O we love love.

I want to go watch say by the Bell Right now. I ever saw a single. I shouldn't tell this. I'm dating myself. I'm been like a such a dinosaur. I don't think I ever saw a single episode of, say, by the belt, but it's not too late. Everywhere one worth, I think. Look everywhere. It's streaming on like every streaming service right now. Well, it could be, because you know, but is that considered an s television show? I think it's like wait, well, here's the funny thing. So I think it's like a like a ladies early s right, okay, guys, will was watching it, like you know, as it was coming out, and then I was kind of watching the reruns and now I make a little well, watch it and he's like, what are they wearing? And it's so great. Okay. Well, my excuse for not watching it was when it was on like a lot of a television from that time period, I was working full time at the paper and so when I came home at night I was writing in secret. So I never saw, I never saw a single episode of there it is, ny. There you go, thirty something. I never saw a single other because that, yeah, I haven't either. Yeah, I need to watch that. Yeah, I was writing. Well, just just like an episode or two, just fit the two, like the taste of it. Yeah, just first of the last episode of every season and you got the whole thing. That's true. Now I can. I can cite chapter and verse of other shows m later, in earlier, but not like you know, ask me, ask me. It's fine, elder friends question the descriptional Netflix is like four, or is it four or five? Five, relatively good kids for something. Life's obstacles out. It was a really funny descripting. I was like the Sun off. Yeah, he knew which show I was thinking about. The other day I was doing research for my my new book, and I was trying to situate myself like in the year in one thousand nine hundred and sixty, like what were people watching? And I came across a Rerett well, I like on Youtube of Mr Ed and I grew up watching Mr Ed all the time on Nick and night and I hadn't thought of it in so many years. Like wasn't that the best? I mean, you know, it is silly show. It was in secret quest I love that show in like Penny Junction, was that around that rood? That's what we can do. We can sing the theme song from Mr Ed, the Horse, of course, of course, of course, Oh God, junction. I loved, loved yeah, I love Nigga. Yeah, and all the like Mary Tyler Moore and Yas done to read and stuff. Yeah, I saw it when it originally aired. So Zip. Yeah, me too, were on. We are older than dirt. We are. That's okay. We could stand right now, but I don't want to. Now that I can, I don't know. That's just found to go to bed. Yeah, and Drink Martini's out of your coffee cap if you want. That's true. That's true. Charleston coffee roads taste a lot. This coffee taste like it has a strong Gim yeah, I have an idea for a new blend juniper and Bun please. It's good. Oh my God, what a great episode with Colling Hoover. Yes, she was had me a bravo. Yeah, right now, like right before. She was like wait, Y'all are having Craig con ever on the PODCAST, and I was like, Oh my God, we're best friends, like colleen and I just became best friends like right then. Yeah, I can tell her. Tell her we had Amy Phillips on to and I was like anytime we can have any bravo, Leberty, we are like beside ourselves about it. It's pretty great. But tell you, guys, I have to get off because somebody sent us Gelato and I'm having Gelato for dinner. Does sound delicious? Yeah, and don't cut your ends pro Oh yeah, maxis, I should tell you that. I don't want you all to be envious, but our friend Tim From and tucket books send us some gelato today. Very, very sweet. Yeah, so I'M gonna have Gelato for dinner, and so thanks Tim and haunting. Yeah, Tim and Sawnto, you're on their way to St Barts. I'm not feeling to me. Neither. I am me today and I was like, I don't even really want to hear from you. You really probably already...

Tan. You're like already Tan. It's just I love him, but I could really use a month and same part. So about y'all to yes, all right, that Gelato isn't going to eat itself. I got this. Is Is this so fun having me on Guy? Thank you. Yes, thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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