Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 month ago

Friends & Fiction with Emily Henry

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Meet #1 New York Times bestselling author Emily Henry. We talk to her about her inspirations and her writing process, her successes, goals, and conquering writer's block, and, of course, about her blockbuster bestseller PEOPLE WE MEET ON VACATION and last year's phenomenon BEACH READ. https://www.emilyhenrybooks.com

Welcome to Friends and fiction. Fivebest selling authors and the stories. Novelists mary Kay andrews, ChristineHarmel, Christie Woodson harvey patty Callahan, Henry and mary Alice Munroare five longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their creditIn 2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviewsand fascinating insider. Talk about publishing and writing and to highlightindependent bookstores. These friends discuss the books, they've written thebooks they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books andyou're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Helloeveryone, it's Wednesday night and that means it's time for the happiest houron the internet. Friends and fiction. Welcome to our show, we have so much tolook forward to tonight. I'm Christie Woodson harvey, I'm mary Kay andrews,I'm Christine Harmel, I'm patty Callahan Henry and this is friendseviction new york times, bestselling authors, endless stories to supportindependent bookstores tonight. You will meet Emily Henry and we'll talkabout her new book people we meet on vacation which was released in May andfind out about what inspires Emily how she conquers writer's block and muchmore. But before we get going we have something really big to celebrate ourfacebook group. Okay, so I should say what it is. So are you kidding ourfacebook group, y'all you beautiful, wonderful community. Oh I love it somuch. I don't have a hat nearby, I do have the santa hat but it's not timeyet. Okay, y'all out there. This beautiful, amazing facebook groupcommunity that was only started last april has just hit 50 1000 membersstrong. 50,000, wow! Thousands. We could never have imagined a milestoneso huge when we started this group and we are doing nothing but growing and weare so grateful to each and every one of you for being part of thismeaningful, positive part of our lives. Oh, it means so much. 50,000. I mean,can you imagine if someone had told us last april, this is where we'd bestanding in a year and a half are sitting as usual. But I thought we'realways sitting there. You are show standing up really shut like now. Whatexactly? All right, so we have updated our friends in fiction bookshop dot orgshop with tonight's guest Emily Henry's books. So you can get this summer'sblockbuster best seller, that's a tongue twister. People we need onvacation. And last year's smash hit beach read in our shop for less than$15 each and remember every purchase you make from the friends and fictionbookshop dot org store helps us to keep friends and fiction going right, wewant to hit 100,000 don't we wait. And a portion of proceeds goes directlyinto the pockets of independent booksellers nationwide, which of coursegoes to the very heart of our mission Since its inception, bookshop.org hasraised $16 million 16 million. Now that is a number. We can get to find all ourguests new books and those by the fab five in our specially curated shop onbookshop dot org. So support indie stores a nationwide with bookshop dotorg from the comfort of your own home sitting or standing and tell them, tellthem good friends and fiction. Well it's a big night around here becauseguess what? We have another trailer reveal for you. Our own mary. Kay isamazing. The santa suit releases in less than two weeks. Are you panickingyet? Leave that does this mean I'm supposed to be decorating or doingchristmas cards or any of that? Your nose cards? I'm behind. I ordered mywreaths yesterday but we want to do Yeah, so we want to share her trailertonight. So sean can you do the honors? Oh my gosh, I'm so excited for this.I'm reading it right now. It is so good...

...so far. You know what? I love that thetrailer said christmas comes early because if there's ever a year where weneeded that. Right, So very pay. Can you tell us a little bit about thesanta suit? Yeah. You know, last year, last fall for the, because of pandemic,there was nothing to do and nowhere to go. I finished the newcomers, my bookthat was out in May. I finished it early for the first time in my longcareer and um we had actually been on a retreat together right? Our friends andfiction retreat. We kind of, we kind of knocked around the idea of doing achristmas book or christmas anthology and I was like, no, I am not doing notdoing a christmas book, no. And then driving home, I was like, I don't knowif it was from there, I called, I know I called Patty and I said, I have anidea and we actually, we went away together. Where do we go? We go toBluffton Patty, No, we went to the mountains, we went to the mountains,that's right, went to cashiers. And so the idea the story is about a youngwoman, her name is ivy Perkins, she's just out of a bad divorce and shedecides she's going to completely change her life. She is um, she's gonnamoved to a new house in a new town and start all over and she decides that shewants to buy an old white farmhouse in the mountains. And so she buys onesight unseen that she finds online and she and her dog, um, she and her dogpumpkin load up and moved to the mountains of north Carolina the weekbefore christmas and in this old house she finds a santa suit on the closetand the suit um, has some magical powers and the magic is really justthat I? Ve kind of looks within herself and finds the spirit of christmas again.So it's a sweet, I hope funny christmas book and I hope I just wanted to bringsome light into the darkness this year and I hope that's what I've done. It'sum, if y'all have never been around mary cantor's when she's what youhaven't, when she's thinking of a new story, it's quite something to watchwhat she calls her chaos brain because she gets an idea and it's like, youknow how you go, it rains and you go to bed and you come out in the morning andthere's mushrooms that appeared overnight. That's Kathy, she got like astory just popped up on the lawn of her mind. It's kind of, are you saying thestories come out of doo doo doo, green, green grass and rain okay.And you know, I don't know where that came from. You know that I was thinkinglike how is really great. Yeah, like off the cuff is good in oncology. Yeah.I was just thinking about how she's driving home and she's like, yeah, thisand the next thing, you know, there's this whole story. I think my favoritepart is it came from, no, I'm not going to write a christmas story. She waslike, yeah, now we know how to get her to do, you're welcome, You're welcome,You're welcome. So every week we partner with Parade magazine online andwe stream from their facebook page and we have an original essay in theironline magazine and this week, Christie reflected on why everything she everneeded to know almost everything she learned on a tennis court. You can findit on our facebook page under announcements and also on our instagrambio. But Christie tell us a little bit about that essay. So awesome. Well it'skind of funny because little Will and I were reading Pat Conroy's, my losingseason and for some reason I started watching friday night lights, you know,10 years later I realized I just was like, I was like, oh my gosh, I wasthinking about all these sports things. And as you read in the article semirecently, um there was an article in my local newspaper about my long dead highschool tennis career. That was pretty interesting and just made me startthinking about um so many things in our lives and just how sometimes are Ourfailures and the things that we think are like the worst mistakes that we'veever made and the worst things that can happen to us, which I mean how bad canit be if you lose it in this match. But you know when you're 18 and 17 it feelslike a big deal but how so often this can be new beginnings and um there arethese great silver linings in, in these situations that we really didn't expect.And so I wanted to ask each of you tonight what life lessons you havelearned in unexpected places. Starting with mary Kay the mushroom queen, I wasthinking about this and I sort of thought reading obituaries. You know,I'm a great obituary reader and I'm always interested in the things thatthat people say about the departed. And it and it's not the things you expectis that she volunteered for cub scout.

She was the, you know, she was the roommother or she was the cub scout leader or she mentors um, so many people inher law firm. And it reminds me that um, the things that matter when you're goneare are not the awards and not all those kinds of kudos that you've gotten.It's not a plaque on a wall. It's the good, it's a good deed you've donewhile you're on earth. And I think that kind of always reminds me, I hopepeople will say, well, you know, she wrote some books, but she was aterrible person. We will say that we're going, we won't let them in the bookhits me. That's not even possible for them to say. I think for me it'sdefinitely not a sports metaphor. So we're just gonna just give that we'rejust going to have to skip that with bookworm patty. You've got a reallygood metaphor tonight. So like you're all okay. And my hook for okay. Yeah.Bookworm Patty wasn't playing any sports. You've given us mushroom K.Andrew. So I think for me, uh it's not that it's, you learn unexpected lessonsby being a mom, but I really like it is consistent learning the same lessonover and over about how exactly what we expect to happen doesn't happen andabout what we don't think will happen. Like there's this we, we go into thingswith a certain mindset and the, the only thing that's certain is that itwon't do what we're expecting it to do. So that's true. Yeah, that's such agood point. Um, you know, I was thinking about this as you, as you guyswere talking and you know, I think one of the most powerful lessons I'velearned in a place I didn't expect was right here on friends and fiction with,with all of you who I'm sharing the screen with, but also with the group asa whole. I think if you had asked me a year and a half ago, well maybe not ifyou had asked me, but if I were being honest with myself, I think I wouldhave thought I'm not enough. You know what I mean? Like I'm just, I'm, youknow, like, yeah, I write books and yeah, I don't know. I think I neverfelt like enough, you know? But, but until, until this last year and a halfand I think between the three of you and then this community that's embracedall of us, I think I've been reminded that there's a place for all of us andsometimes the best thing you can be is just yourself. Like just be the bestversion of yourself rather than always thinking of the things that you're not,you know what I mean? And, and so thank you to all of you, to you three and toall of you out there for reminding me of that lesson that I think I'velearned too late in my life. That is amazing. Oh my God, Mascara. No, youknow, I mean, I really did think today and I said this on facebook, but I dofeel like in some ways like doing this with all of you kind of reminded mewhat it was like to be a part of a team. I'm like every day there's somethingnew thrown at you and every day there's something that you don't expect and youknow, but it doesn't matter if you're together and like you can, you candisagree on something or you can have a, you can be in a bad mood that day. Likeit doesn't matter because you're getting out on the court and you aregoing to be be the jackets from Lexington. Yeah, I mean, but whateverit is, I mean it's not like team by were like, you just, you're kind oflike your real self at some point, which I think a lot of times we don'treally see that in each other, okay, outside of this. Okay, so let's talkabout our incredible guest Emily Henry and I did want to just remind everybody,we will hopefully be taking live questions to make sure to drop yourquestions for Emily um, into the chat, whether wherever you're watching onfacebook or Youtube because hopefully we'll get to some of them. But she asyou know, is the number one new york times best selling author of severalnovels, including people we need on vacation and beat read her books havebeen featured. I'm going to give you a list, but I'm also going to sayeverywhere everywhere. Been featured in Oprah Entertainment weekly, The skimbustle everywhere. Yeah, Emily studied creative writing at Hope College andthe new york Center for Art and Media Studies these days. Days days, shespends most of her time in Cincinnati and the part of Kentucky justunderneath it Kentucky that makes me want to go there for the bourbon trailagain anyhow. Her new book people we meet on vacation was released in Mayand follows two best friends, Poppy and Alex on their annual summer vacationsafter an incident causes them to lose touch For two years. The pair decidesto reunite for one final trip, which may very well be their last chance tosave their relationship.

Awesome. Oh my God, thank you. Thankyou so much for having me. I have to say I was just like alternating betweenlaughing hysterically and like tearing up, I think I know what makes the masscare. I well we're so glad you're here. We're huge fans and I actually savedpeople we meet on vacation to help me get out of my end of summer slump andit's totally delivered, but I always have to have something that I'm likelooking forward to reading at the end of summer so that I don't feel sodepressed about summer being over. Oh my gosh, wow, I am. I think the exactopposite where like, I am so ready for full reads and watching that trailerfor mary Kay's christmas book ready? Yes, I'm ready. I'm ready. Just likeinjected into my veins. I totally get that I'm ready. It's starting to cooloff a little and I'm getting there now, I'm getting dark earlier. I noticedwhen we were getting ready to it's happening, it's happening. But can youtell us about your wonderful new novel please? Sure. Okay, so I will mostly, Iguess be recapping, but people who meet on vacation follows Alex and Poppy, umwho are just two oddballs in their own distinct ways and when they meet, theydon't really hit it off, they kind of just despise each other instantly, likeon principle. Um they're really, really different. Um but in that difference,it weirdly creates this really fertile ground for a great friendship becausethere's just no, kind of like bending yourself to, you know, meet someone'sexpectations. They're just so different, they both think that there's no hopefor their friendship and that is actually what creates such a specialbond between the two of them. Um and like you were saying they take a yearlytrip even after they both graduate from college and moved to different cities.Um Poppy is working as a travel journalist in new york, and Alex isback in their hometown in Ohio, working as a teacher. Um and I don't know, itwas just a lot of fun to write, it was, you know, it was, I did not write itduring a pandemic, but I edited it during the pandemic and so it reallywas like, oh thank God, I can just like disappear into this and pretend to betraveling. Um and yeah, I just kind of like stuffed it with everything I likeand it's sort of an ode to uh when Harry Met Sally at its core. So thatwas the best movie fast. Yeah, Okay, well, so um a review of people we needon vacation on Shondaland no less says Henry has made a name for herself andtaking typical romance novel tropes and adding modern twists and if you areindeed a fan of romance novel tropes, which I am and obviously lots of peopleare then you come to the right place and in her new novel, people we meet onvacation, we've got friends to lovers, we've got opposites attract. We've gotslow burns, Oh my God, I love a slow Burns and almost moments and this novelhas got it all, it is all the better for it, what, you know, a lot of peoplehave discarded the idea of rom com, they're coming back into voguethankfully. But tell me what inspired you to write in this genre, did youknow, you were writing in it? I did what I actually wasn't sure if anyoneelse would think that I was, what happened was um you know, I had beenpublishing y a novels, I had like a very midlist career meaning there, Ihad some readers, but actually, you know, hardly anyone had heard of me, mybookstore events as we were talking before we started this were largelyempty. Um and I had been doing that for a few years and I loved it, but I alsowas very burnt out, I was like writing these coming of age stories, and I feltlike I kind of said everything I had to say about that like time and life andthen 2016 rolled around, and the world felt very chaotic and unpredictable andscary, and I was just not in a great place mentally and emotionally, and soI had kind of, some downtime between projects, and I thought I'm going tojust write like, my version of a romcom, and I didn't have any plans to sell it,I really just thought like, I need to do something. Yeah, it's so rare, onceyou start publishing because you kind of get onto that train and you're like,I have to do a book every year and like whatever, just all of the kind of likestructure of it, but it just worked out where I was like, I have this time I'mgonna do this um I'm not gonna worry about if anyone wants to read it ifanyone likes it. Um and it was so fun, it was so fun to write a book that likeI really didn't think anyone wanted um and certainly nobody specifically likeexpected for me and I did just set it...

...aside when I was done and I think liketwo years went by and then I kind of noticed that Rome comes in in fiction,we're starting to have like this big boom with jasmine Guillory and Helenwang and sally thorne, just kind of seeing like oh you know like kind oflike cuts illustrated cover rendition of romance novels where they're sort oflike let's get new readers in. Um and I was watching this sort of blow up andso I emailed my agent was like I think I wrote one of these a couple of yearsago and I'm not positive, that's what I wrote, but I think that's what I wroteand so I sent it to her and she was really excited about it um but alsodidn't like totally know how to sell into that, she was mostly a y a agentand she, you know, she she recommended some books for me to read, so I startedreading really widely in the genre and like, I was like, yes, I love this,this is this feels good, this is just nice. Um And then when she actuallyretired from agenting, I went to my current agent who was like specificallyjust like cornering the romance market. Um and yeah, I don't know, it's likethat kind of cliche advice that like every writer gives to every otherwriter, which is like right, what you want to read. Uh and on the one hand Iwant to say, and it is true, but the fact is like, I was writing what Iwanted to read before that and it wasn't selling and that happens to, butI think the point is, your greatest joy is always going to come from thatfeeling of making what you actually want to make. And so if you're tryingto just like crack the market and come up with like this is what we want, youdon't believe in it, it's not gonna, it's not gonna be something you end upbeing really proud of and um you're not going to have a really blissful coupleof months working on a book, which is like kind of feeling I'm always chasing,I don't know about all of us like that feeling I have a bone to pick with youthough. I'm reading, I'm reading beach, read and she talks about when she firstgoes away to the Lake House and she tells her agent I can write a book inthree months, I can write a book in half that time. And I'm like, all right,who is this person? This is fiction. Right. Well that was in 2016. Okay.Just generally does not does not okay, just checking on that. I don't know.It's like, it's funny because you know, I think the other thing is likeobviously like the dream for so many of us is like to get to the point wherewriting can be like the day job. But it also is really funny how like once youleave your other day job, you're like, why am I not getting any more done? Yes,Yes. It's like when you send the kids to school and you're like, oh my gosh,I have these. Yeah, I accidentally blinked and like now I've seen threeseasons of Felicity but I'm picking them up. I'm going to get them so funnyEmily I'm asking this because I have such a hard time balancing it. You aresuper open about your life on social media and you're not only a hugeadvocate for other authors, which I love, I love watching when you'reposting you. Yeah, but it's also you take the time to let your readers andfollowers do that. Ask you anything. So how do you, here's what I know all ofus talk about all the time. How do you balance being a person who everyonewants to know and maybe it feels like they do know while also being able toturn into your work and produce these gorgeous stories. How do you balancethat? That is so hard? And I like selfishly would rather just have all ofyou answer it and actually what I really want is like we're in a room onthe bourbon trail and that's good for hours to talk about this. Yeah, we'rein alright, we're doing it heavily. I honestly signed me up. Yes. Um yeah,it's so hard and I don't know, I'm like very, I'm present on instagram, butthat's the only social media I'm on. Um which helps, like I think when you're,when I was trying to do multiple things, I realized something was always fallingto the wayside, but it is so hard and strange because on the one hand you'relike, wow, what a gift to be able to interact directly with readers. Um buton the other hand, you're like, I don't know, I don't know, it is so hard toturn your focus away from that and to go into writer mode instead of likepersonality. Like I'm a I'm an instagram personality or whatever. Umand I think like the big thing for me was I did have a lot of strugglesinitially trying to figure out like how am I going to use instagram becauseit's like obviously the thing that I think we're all craving is likeauthentic human connection, but it's so hard to be authentic when you're seeingyourself and you're typing it out and it's just really, really hard. Um And Irealized like, oh, the only thing that like doesn't really give me any stresswhen it comes to instagram is talking about other people's books that I love.Like that only feels good and feels...

...easy and it doesn't feel like it costsme very much. It's like I have to take a pretty picture and like then write acaption, but it's like that's an easy enough way to engage that. I feel likeactually has value. Um And then the ask me Anythings that I was doing and willcontinue to do like, that honestly came out of um watching some, you know, thisis like my second time debuting because I had a y a career before this, but I'mwatching kind of some of the debut authors um of 2020 when I debuted withthe trade and like seeing their struggles and how much they didn't knowlike what what they were going through was normal and before all of this, youknow, we were all talking about like our our worst bookstore events and likethe awkwardness of the humiliation when you're there with another author. It'slike when you invite the whole class to your birthday party and it's like worsethan one kid shows up. It's like, well now my mom has to take me to like theMcdonald's play place with this one kid, I barely know um actually didn't happento me. It sounds like I like him pulling from like, but it happened to afriend but we're in my head maybe it didn't, I just blocked it out, but likemaybe it was a mushroom, it was a mushroom. Um Well yeah, so I like theyhave totally lost the like rope descending the anchor at this point. Umso social media talking about oh the A. M. A. The EMAS I was doing. So I waswatching debut authors kind of struggle and and knowing like realizing, oh theydon't know that what's happening to them is normal. Like I was watchingthem kind of share in different forums what was going on and like having kindof the heartbreak that a lot of people don't realize kind of goes withpublishing because you have this personal experience and this thingthat's kind of like this little baby to you and then you share with the worldand even when it's well received, there's like a weird grief and painthat goes with it. Um So it kind of started from that just realizing likewe're not really set up as authors, Publishers do a great job with a lot ofthings, but the kind of emotional end of it is not their job and that's fair,but like we just don't get prepared for a lot of things. So I kind of just doveinto that and and was really surprised how like hungry for it people were andso it really just kind of feels like the thing that I can do um as far asbalance, I like when I'm writing, when I'm actively drafting, I really easeoff of social media. Um and it's more like when I'm editing, I feel like Iuse social media to like not the editing too much up under that. Yeah,it's like a little click here. Like they're like here, you know, I'm ondeadline if I'm like very active on instagram, right? For sure. Yeah, so oryou get like a dead end or Yeah, I know, just for fun. What's one of theweirdest things you've ever been asked on your Ask Me Anythings or on yourinstagram? At Okay. Yeah, I'm trying to think. I know there have been somereally weirdly specific ones on the, the EMAS, um sometimes I thinksometimes they're two that come to mind that aren't that weird. They're notthat weird. So if you've sent these in, if somebody who's watching sent thesein, don't feel bad, they're not that weird, but it just surprised me thefirst is I get a lot of pitches for what should happen in Sequels to mybooks like that. Yeah, I am like daunted by it too. I like try not toread them because I'm also like a very paranoid person and like what ifsomeday I wake up and I have the urge to write a sequel and it happens to bethe same thing that someone pitched me and I like go down the, like the plotby jean, like what happened? Uh yeah, just like don't tell me anything youguys and they're always like volunteering it. Like you can have this,please write this. Um but that and then I also, lately I think because I havelike a surprising number of Like younger readers, like not from my Yeight days, from my romance days. I get a lot of messages that are like, hey,it's my friend or my girlfriend's birthday, can you send a happy birthdayvideo? And I haven't done it because one I get a lot of them and I'm justlike, I can't sign up for this. Like if I do it once, maybe doing one. Yeah.Yeah. And then to, I am so paranoid that I'm like, what if this is likesome kind of phishing scam and they get my voice and then they get like, Idon't know, I don't know anything works. You don't either. Why don't we talkabout something and then there's an add on our phone. I don't yeah, it happensnot be amount of time. Exactly. Why do we think about something and it's onour, it's too much. I know, I know exactly. So Emily you wrote in a reallyfascinating piece for Zoila about what happened after you were finished withyour y a novel, a million june's you...

...said, and I love this, I love thisbecause I could identify with it so much. It used me up that book and whenI was done with it, I had no idea where to go next. My writer's block was shortlived but intense, a complete, kind of mental emptiness I'd never experiencedbefore, in which I found surprisingly painful. I had only just discovered whyI needed writing so much and then it felt like writing had abandoned me, Ihad no ideas, I was a dried out sponge. Um Oh my gosh, I love that, like,seriously, like, we've all been there, but it's like even there are even bitsand pieces of every single book process where I find myself at that momentwhere you Yeah, uh you know, so I guess I'm wondering, what do you do toconquer writer's block? What do you have, What advice do you have forwriters out there who are experiencing it? Like, perhaps some little ones besthere right now, The Birth Pool Room has ever experienced writer's block. It'sokay, it's so tricky because I do feel like any writing advice comes with thecaveat that like, if it doesn't work for you abandon it, like, that's how Ioperate, totally feel. Um But for me, I have realized a lot of my writer'sblock really, I mean with with a million june's, it was specificallylike I really had emptied myself out. I had no ideas left, I needed to go livemy life. Um and that can be really hard when you feel like you're on a roll orhave momentum or have a schedule to keep to where you're just like I'm not allowed to not have any ideas.I don't, I can't live my life, I can go see friends whatever. But I have reallyfound that the bulk of my writer's block is actually just a fear offailure and it's that feeling when you have an idea for a book, but you don'tfeel like you can get it into the shape that it has in your head yet. Or evenlike sometimes it really is like no ideas for a scene. But the thing islike I could just start writing and open this um floodgate at least tricklein myself, but there's the fear holding back of like what if I try and thewords don't come um or what if I try and they're so bad and they're unusable.And I've really gotten to the point since I had that realization where nowI write, even if I have nothing to say, which again is not necessarily advicefor everyone. Um that could just be tortured for most people. But assomeone who tends to draft fairly quickly, I try to honor like a dailyword count and if I don't know what comes next, I will literally have mycharacters go to the grocery store or just like do mundane things becauseeventually if I, if I put my phone away and I'm not like on social media andnot on the internet and I really commit to it. If I just have my characterswander eventually, I'll figure out something interesting to happen and soa lot gets cut in my leader drafts and so that's not like, you know,reasonable approach for a lot of people, but for me it's so freeing to get pastthat blank. Yeah, that blank page. That's so intimidating. Well it's sucha good point because I feel like so much of what you're doing during thattime is talking to your characters right and giving them the opportunityto talk back to you or sometimes it's just the thing that has to happen. Ialso think it's really interesting, Emily that you really had your hugebreakout success um, at a time when you did take your foot off the gas a littlebit right. Like you just gave yourself permission to write the book that likeyou're inside was saying I need to write and I think that's um that's areally good lesson. I think that's a, that's a good lesson because I think itcan be really tempting to just go along that same um, that same path with that,that forward momentum and just have to keep going? I have to keep going. Soalong those lines, I'm wondering what for you? Would you consider the mostfulfilling part of being a writer? I can I request that everybody give metheir answers after this. Sure. Most excruciating conversation because Ihave all these interesting people here charge here. I'm going to demandanswers. So I think for me it really is when drafting is going well, nothingfeels better than when I like, forget I'm writing. That is just the bestfeeling when you look up and it's kind of gotten dark but you didn't get up toturn on the lamp. Like, that feeling, I think is what I'm just constantlychasing and it's the same feeling is reading something you really love. Weforget your reading and you can't do anything else. Yeah. That's awesome.Yeah. That idea of getting lost in your own story, right? Like that's the wayyou can get lost in other books. Yeah, that is a feeling worth chasing. Iagree. That's my favorite part too. I mean definitely for sure. And I mean, Iknow I didn't say this, I'm sure I got it from somewhere, but I think it'slike, it's like falling in love because it's all you want to just when you havethose moments really, you just want to...

...get back to me and the script andthat's all you can think about and like every conversation you're having inreal life, you're really thinking about what's going on over here and it's likethe greatest feeling in the world. It's like, I think the thing that keeps usgoing when I'm like, yes, I hate these stupid line at it and what questionsand why are they asking? I'm like, I just, it's okay. I'm going to haveanother, I'll have another mean going to fall in love again. Exactly. I thinkmy answer is like it toggles between two the most fulfilling part of being awriter because when I imagined having a published book, you know, 20 years ago,I imagine that the most fulfilling part would be seeing my name on a book inthe store, which is amazing and hitting the list and the good news. Like, buthonestly it's I toggle between what you just said Emily this like falling downand there they are. You've been looking for them, those people to do this thingfor months and all of a sudden it just But then on the toggle side, on theother side, it's the writing community and the region. Yes. Like who knew thatwas waiting. They're the best people in the world. Yeah. How about you mary Kay,I think, I think, yeah, I think it's chasing that rush of, you know the daythat you wrote a paragraph maybe more than a paragraph where you went uh huhthat, you know, And so that's what you're chasing because you, you tellyourself I'll never write that paragraph again. But maybe if I keepwriting over and over and over and over again, I'll, you know, I'll writesomething as good as that. Um Well maybe who knows something even better.And so I think that's sort of what keeps me going is, you know, can Imaybe I could get better at this because I never feel like any good atit. You know, I'm riddled with. So I'm so riddled with self doubt and selfloathing and I I was telling them I had 100,000 words today on my book that'sdue in two weeks and I'm like, I don't know, I just don't know, I don't knowif it's going to happen. But you know when you write a good, I wrote a goodparagraph, I wrote a good scene yesterday and so when I went to bedlast night I thought to myself, okay, you did that, you could, you could dothat again, we do that again. So that's that's for me. And sometimes you don'tknow you wrote that great thing you're talking about Emily and mary Kay untilyou re read it. And you're like, oh yeah, it feels like garbage. I meaneven hearing that Zoila essay, that's what we were talking earlier too aboutthe stress of all the essays that you have heard for release. I remember Iwas on vacation when I was supposed to be writing that. And I like it was theend of the night and I was just like I cannot write a single word. I'm likewhat is happening to me. I feel sick to my stomach and so I asked for anextension and it was like I had to write 1000 words or something and itwas like you would think that I had been asked to translate the bible from.It's like just like this is so much work and yeah, the original Aramaic noteven agree. You know, we're going all the way back. I think it's justsometimes you can handle one more thing. It's like I just can't do what my yes100%. You don't really, I'm sure what about yeah. You know, I think I always forget atthe beginning of writing a book how, how much I can fall into the joy ofthat journey of writing it because I feel so intimidated by that mount thatyou have to do or by the fact that you don't really know those characters yet.Um, so I would say one of the things is just getting into the flow of the bookand realizing like a complete revelation out of nowhere like, oh mygosh, I can do this. Like these characters are speaking. I do worry butyou just have that paralyzing fear until you get there right. And then theother part that's so fulfilling which I think I had forgotten about, notforgotten about but I had I had pushed to the back before getting outphysically on the road for a week this year before the delta variant hit andsuddenly, you know, we're worrying again. But um the number of people whocome up and tell you in person that like your book spoke to them this wayor that way or you know, even just receiving those emails from people umthat's it, like that reminder of like okay, that's that's why we do thisbecause like this book that I wrote in my little home office could meansomething to somebody somewhere and like how amazing is that? How lucky arewe? How lucky we all we're the luckiest thing to get to do right. It's so great,it really is. And I got one of those this morning from a lady and I emailedher back and I was like, literally this was the best start to my day that youcould possibly imagine. She was like, oh my God, I can't believe your emailme back, I can't believe you answered, I gotta answer. You saw somethingreally nice now on the other way and then I'll answer, I just won't hit sendbecause of alleged way. I'll send my...

...answer to patty and I I should send itand she says no, I love that, but it's true. I don't know, I don't know ifreaders really know like the full extent of what kind of an honor thatfeels like to be like, oh I'm like in your life I'm like in your housesomebody made that left me and just floated down the river made its way toyou and it's such a weird, strange honor and I think I don't think thatthey really can, if they haven't, you know, made something like that andshared it then I don't I don't think they know like how valuable that is,what what an honor it feels like. But on the flip side until I became anauthor, I would never have sent an author. So me neither how much I lovethere, but because I would have been like they don't want to hear from me,They must now I do. Yeah, I love to fan girl, I love to fangirl and send peoplefangirl notes and say you know I love this scene in your book and you touchsomething and yeah, yeah, I know it means a lot to me when I get a notelike that. So I try to do it. So speaking of weird strange honors. Youhave accomplished so much for being a nominee for jimmy Fallon's book club tohitting number one on the new york times bestseller list and about amillion things in between. You have achieved so much in your time is anauthor. Is there something that means the most to you are like a standoutmoment where you were like, I wow, like that thing happened. Well okay, so Idefinitely will say the there there have been a few, the number one on thenew york times list. Like obviously every author kind of dreams abouthitting the list period and be treated was the first time I did and that wasmind blowing and with people leaving on vacation um I don't know, it's like you kind ofexpect things to feel really surreal and then a lot of times they just don't,I was telling you earlier like I I almost wonder if I detached myself fromit to be like this isn't really happening. Like don't don't feel a lot,it's a lot. It is. But when my editor called me to tell me that people uhdebuted at number one, that was like one of the only times that I really hadsort of like my whole body went hot, I started playing and I just like kind oflove. But like my reaction, my instant reaction was I screamed at her multipletimes. No, no, no. It really was like showing up at my door like to tell mesomething horrible had happened. It was so overwhelming and the jimmy Fallonthing was really surreal to to just watch that and just like hear him saymy name was really weird because I think it was weird in a good way whereyou realise that everybody is just people just everybody just people whichis not grammatically correct, but it is what I want to say, We get it, you getit. Um And that's really helpful because I think when you're strivingand working so hard, you just kind of think everybody else is like so likemary Kay being like, oh I doubt everything. I write all that. Like youit's just everybody feels that way. Everybody feels that way no matter howaccomplished and shiny they look from the outside. Um So to kind of feel likeyou know the constant low grade imposter syndrome and then to havejimmy Fallon just like saying my name. Like he has heard of me was like, hello?Yeah, like we're all just people and we're all doing you know the thingsthat we care about and getting better at them. Um Yeah. Yeah. And that was Imean that was really cool but I think like this is such a long answer, I'msorry. No. Right, so great. There's so there's kind of a flip side to thatwhich like my my last y a novel. It tanked it tanked in every respect ofthe word, but I had this weird like surreal kind of experience where ittanked and then be treated sold and kind of right away. I knew things werekind of clicking in a way that they never had before and I was watchingthings gear up pre pub and just getting really great press and feeling so muchexcitement and support from my publishing team and being like, okay,this is like how it feels when the machine is well oiled and everything'sworking. Um and around the same time, like a few other weird, like weird tome, they're not weird to anyone else, but weird little things happenedincluding a show that I really loved got cancelled which was the Oa onnetflix um and it got canceled and there was this huge movement of peoplewho are trying desperately to save it and like doing all these weird thingsto just try and convert this thing that had meant so much to them. And I reallyfelt changed by that because I realized you can make something really specialand really unique and it doesn't matter...

...what anyone else says about it, itdoesn't matter if someone says that there's no value to that, there's nomoney to be made, there is no way to like to modify this, it's not good,it's too weird, it's too strange, whatever. And I say this now like youknow, publishing romcom novels which are like fairly accessible, but itreally was life changing to me to have this book that I really loved andbelieved in tank in multiple and multiple profound ways and to realizeat the same time I was watching something that I thought was so specialand new not you know, get to continue on and to realize like, oh it's reallygreat when you can get commercial success and critical claim and all ofthat. But at the end of the day, I really believe that it matters that youmake the thing that you believe in in like kind of a way. But like yeah, evenif 10 people out there actually like needed that and everyone else is like,this is weird and I hate it If those 10 people are worth it and the thing thatyou need to take needs to be made and I think that has been like one of thebest lesson. So now it's like amazing because I can look back on this bookthat just failed and feel like so much love and affection and pride for it.Even like no one really likes it. Like it's just like I believe that it neededto be made and I don't know why, but I believe that that's awesome. I will notanswer. I will say my least popular book is my favourite one. So like whatdoes that say about me? I'm not really sure you made something that was soniche that was so like this is for this. Like I don't know, maybe if I hadpublished it now, like I don't know, maybe help them happens. It does. Ithink it's common. Uh okay, so we have got so many great questions from ouraudience from our audience coming in so patty, can you ask a question from ouraudience. Absolutely, we do have a lot. So sorry to yell out there on facebook,we can't see the names right now. So this is from facebook, how does yourfamily life play into your characters? You know, I'm like, which member of myfamily is watching this? Uh It doesn't, it doesn't, I think, Ithink that from my books you can tell probably that I come from a family witha lot of love in it and that's like very um I feel very, very blessed bythat. Um but I don't write my family into my books in that way. Um I haven'twritten my husband into any books. I don't know if I could like, I love theidea of writing a couple who is us, but I just feel like I know him too well,but I couldn't just kill him into like a character like that to a multitudethere. Um but I do think, I think everything about us kind of makes ourway into our books. Like, you know, family passion, like faith politics,like all of that. Like, I think it all make it because it's like you're doingeven when you're not, you're not telling your story if you're writingfiction, but all these little details, I don't know, there's still just like aworldview behind every book, I think and I think that's really fun. Like aworld behind it. Well, it's like, you can, you know, with all of y'all, it'slike, you can tell with your books like that you are, you know, bighearted,generous people who are like deep thinkers who like to have fun. Andthat's like, I don't know, it's like, that's I think one of the great thingsabout falling in love with that really does sound like us. Me, deep thinkingthing does not change. Some of you are mushrooms and we're getting more. So ifyou are deep thinkers, we're going to make that are new. Some of us are aboutas deep as a puddle, but it's a lie. It's a puddle. You guys liked mushroomin the stories are, you're like the deep end of the day. It's like reallygreat point. And I had to like hilarious. So, and it's very true ifyou went there in the next question, I think we'removing on to the writing tip. So I do have to say the way you just answeredthat question jokingly sometimes say all we have is our own compost pile towrite from. Right? So there's no right. It's this the books, you know, withoutus, but they're from us. What goes in compost piles, just saying yesmushrooms. Any waiting it out. I am so moving past this every week, one of ourfavorite parts of the show is a writing tip. And I feel like this has been inmany ways. One long, glorious writing tip. But do you have a writing tip thatyou like to tell other writers when...

...they come to you for advice? I meanhonestly it's so basic, but I do generally just tell people to keepgoing because I think that that fear, like I mean watching this, if you'rewatching this, you realize how, how everyone on your screen right now justkind of pushes through a fair amount of terror and like we've made that prettyclear. So I think I think that a lot of times that fear of like I'm not doingthis right or what if I never have another magical paragraph for all ofthat just can slow you down. And so I am for me again, a big believer in justwriting, whether it's good or not just writing until you find something thatmakes sense. Um and I really believe in finishing first drafts if you canbecause I think a lot of times you just, you give up on something too soonbecause of that fear in that block and you kind of lose your momentum. Ialways lose my momentum. 20,000 words like the book peter sell for a littlebit. Yeah, the soggy middle. Yeah, it's so hard at the beginning, you're like,I'm so excited I'm writing a book and then the end, it kind of comes togetheragain and I think a lot of people just kind of who want to be writing, we wantto be publishing kind of give up during that sagging middle. So I really, Ireally believe in finishing it, even if you think it's horrible because it'shonestly probably not as bad as you think it is. It's such a good point.Emily, can you just come back every week? You're like, like Sunshine join,be like, like just join in and yeah, a little side commentary. Yes, but therequirement is that we are on the trail. Yes, I am so sign. My God Friends,fiction. Live from Lexington or live from Louisville. Yeah, absolutely. Iknow we don't say it because we will do it like it was serious too. I've beenthree times. I will yes, I I'm ready to leave right now. I've been going, it was great. Oh my gosh! Alright, soEmily, that was such a great writing tip. Do you have a book you'd like torecommend tonight? Something you've read recently that you want our viewersknow about? Yeah, it's not out for a couple weeks I don't think, but ifyou're ready to move into the false spirit, you could read this like theday before you read the santa suit, so you can kind of hit the Halloween bybefore christmas. Um but Lana harper's payback's a which is a really fun, alot of it. It's genius and I think the sequel, I uh the Sequels somethingabout like, so like it's a play on words were cursed instead of instead ofworse, like for better or cursed or something like that I don't remember.Um but it's kind of I think she pitched it has like um practical magic meetsjohn tucker must I sort of like I know it sounds amazing. These three witches,you've been burned by the same man. Like kind of set out to like the samewarlock set out to like teach him a lesson and it's really magical and funand it's great. It's great. Yeah. That's awesome. All right. Well so nowwe want to talk about your favorite bookstore and we talked about it alittle ahead ahead of time because I think I have all of us been to yourfavorite bookstore. I haven't well you must more than the bourbon trail sothis can all kind of get, this can all be full circle it all happening. Yeah,but then we can go see Ron in Cleveland. Yes, there you go. This is a bookcoming together right past the soggy middle. Exactly. Exactly. Emily Tell usabout your favorite story. So my favorite bookstore is joseph Beth whichthere is one in Lexington as well, but there's one in Cincinnati which is myhome store. Um And it's just amazing. Like it has the feeling of like I justfeel like you know you think about the bookstores from your childhood and howmagical it felt to go into that. I mean like the air had this certain feelingand smell and as an adult it's like harder to capture that feeling and it'slike joseph best for whatever reason, still has that like little Colonel ofmagic. Yeah, they're great. They do great events and um all the books thatare really nice. You great about if you live in the city and compact, there yougo. But it is a great story. They have a huge, huge variety and I love them.They have great sidelines too. I remember, I don't know what that means.Sideline means all the little gift e things. Yeah, they do. Yeah, it is sortof like a cracker barrel had. Yes, yes. Yeah, there was one in charlotte. Theremight still be one in charlotte, but remember they closed in charlotte. Iremember going to open for about a day. Okay. I remember buying sideliningstuff in there along with books. You know, they did great sidelines. Well,you don't know about? Obviously not. I...

...know I should have bought more. Youcould have kept the charlotte store. Yeah, okay, my husband, he would say,oh, okay, enough, enough of this hilarity Emily. And everybody elsestick around because we have one more thing we want to talk about. But firstwe want to remind all of you out there to check out our friends and fictionwriter's block podcast. We will always post links under the announcements eachtime a new one goes out. It's a lot of fun. It's totally different from thisshow. So if you like hanging out with us here we know you'll like you'll lovebeing with us there every friday. This past week Ron Christie and Patti talkedto Christy barrett and Andrea cats about facebook reading groups. Thenthis week Ron and Patty talked to nat Philbrick about history and if you doand we hope you will um listen to the podcast like and subscribe and commentright, is that all things you want to tell them all those things, do theirthings and okay you guys book club, if you're not hanging out with us yet. Andthe Friends and fiction official book club, obviously you're missing out andyou know, we would hate for you to miss out. So you'll have to join the groupwhich is separate from us and is run by our friends lisa Harrison and BrendaGartner is now 9000 strong. How amazing is that? So on september 20th, which isthis coming monday, Patty will be joining to discuss her novel thebookshop Atwater's end, so be there or be square and they have some coolthings coming up this fall. And next week right here at seven p.m. I hostall of us host the new york times bestselling novelist widely cash. He'llbe live at an indie bookstore in charlotte north Carolina park roadbooks and then in two weeks join us as we welcome Debbie Macomber andcelebrate the launch of mary Kay andrews the santa suit and if you're onmy instagram, you saw me put on the hat that we will be wearing and you know,if I'm going to wear that hat, it's a great book and I love her. So it is, itis that time. It is santa suit time. Alright Also don't forget that you cancatch up on all of our past episodes and even watch us live each week onyoutube. Just type friends and fiction in the search bar to find our channel.Right. So Emily, I know we talked a lot about your history and how much yourface, how much full of life and fun your family is, but a question thatgives our listeners and us so much insight into your writing life is whenyou were growing up, What were the values around reading and writing inyour childhood? Oh my gosh, they were actually enormous. I mean my, so yeah,this one of my happiest memories probably is my parents, I have twobrothers and we had rooms at the end of the hall and that night my parentswould kind of like bring out some pillows and they would sit at theintersection between our rooms and they would read to us and my dad would doall the voices. They read all the Lord of the Rings novels to us, all thechronicles of Narnia novels. Um, I know like my mom and I read all of like theblack stallion books together and like it was just, I would just sometimesstill. I think my dad will read aloud to my mom and she'll just like go tosleep and like he'll still be and so they were, they were huge readers and,and I don't think, I don't know, I guess I guess I got it from them, butat the same time I was like kind of a late bloomer with reading and so Ithink there was also an element of like being a youngest child and not beingable to do something and then once it clicked, I was just so excited I coulddo it. Um, and so yeah, I was, I was definitely a huge reader from the timethat I could read and even before I love hearing those stories. I alwayslove those stories. Yeah, thank you for being here with ustonight and to all of you out there, we encourage you to grab Emily's new novel.People we meet on vacation. I mean if there's anyone out there who hasn'tread it because I can't imagine there could be that many people, but if youdon't pick it up at your local independent bookstore on our bookshopdot org page and everywhere books are sold so Emily thank you. Thank you.Thank you for joining us tonight for being when you're sharing your timewith us. It was such a treat and um, we'll see you on the bourbon trail. Yes,so much, I can't wait. Thank you all doing it. Good night. Thank you. Allright guys. Um That was so fun. We'll see you in a minute after show wherewe'll announce our merge star of the week, but come back same time, sameplace next week as we welcome Wiley Cash. Mhm. She was so great that shewas I had to run out of everybody because she had a dinner to go to, butshe's with us in spirit and God, she...

...was such a great guest. I okay, we'vetalked about this before, but I was like nervous to meet her because I'mlike such a big fan and I like follow her on instagram and I was like, oh myGod, like I'm gonna and I was kind of nervous to me or she's so great. Shewas so great. I think you can tell, I don't know if you guys feel this way,but you know like when we're in the like the fake green room before theshow, you can just tell like all this is gonna be a really fun show. You havethe same thought. Yeah, yeah, good folks. You know, because you knowbefore the show, I feel like we just it's gonna be a lot when you're a guestand you come in because we're all just talking and like, you know, Yeah, andshe just fell right into our rhythm today. I think that's what it is, whensomeone comes in and they fall right into it without missing a beat, you'relike, okay, this is awesome, this is really great. Um okay, well before wekind of dive deeper into that, we do need to announce our merch star of theweek. Um so the winner of Patty Callahan's not yet released. Once youfind a wardrobe is drum roll, please. Barbara, Bank of It Green. So Barbara,thank you so much for sharing your merch. And if you don't have anyfriends in fiction, merch, you can get, oh, she's got, there's her layout. Shegot all kinds of good stuff going on. We have T shirts and wine cities thatI'm holding mine up right now that you can't see. But um and I think we're outof coffee templars right now actually, so we're kind of, we're rolling outsome new products soon, but but we are so grateful to all of you out there whobuy our merge. So thank you for supporting friends in fiction and umit's great stuff. I like carry my cups around all the time. So good there.Yeah, so when are we going on the bourbon trail? Yeah, I was, I'm soserious about that. Like you were joking about it, but it is, it's just a,it's beautiful there, but be like, even even if you're not a huge bourbondrinker, which I know we all drink bourbon, but even if it's notnecessarily the thing you reach for, there's something about the history andthe culture behind it that make you fall in love with it in a different way.Like there's just like I said, I've done it three times and, and I feellike I could do it 50 more and learn that doesn't make me an alcoholic justmakes me maybe it does, but, but no, it's just, I learned something newevery time and kind of fall in love with bourbon country again and againand again. So, um, yeah, we have to do it. I'm serious. I mean we're doing somany great events together. Um, you know, and I, why would we not add thatin? I think that's like such a great idea. Okay, so I want to know what,yeah, the bourbon trail. Um, why don't you explain it? Kristie Kristin sinceyou've been so many times since I'm the alcoholic years. Yeah. Um, so thebourbon trail is a collection of distilleries throughout, throughoutKentucky, um, uh, primarily based around Louisville, Lexington and oh myGod, Bardstown. This the other is the other town. So like most of them arekind of in that region and it's a walking trail in Louisville and thedriving trail around the state. And so you go from distillery distillery, um,they used to have incentives for going to, all of them, like you could get a tshirt or whatever, but it's just really cool. It's like a way to go seedifferent distilleries that are part of the tour and it's, it's places likeMaker's Mark jim beam for roses. Um uh Buffalo Trace 17 92. Like a lot of umGosh, my favorite um why am I forgetting the name of it? Town branch?So I don't know that one. Oh it's so good. It's made by the same people whomake Kentucky bourbon barrel ale. Um Yeah, basil Hayden, it's just, it'sbasically one of Will's favorites. Tom loves basil Hayden to you. Like youlearn about it. Um It's just amazing. It's just, it's a cool vibe and there'slike a lot of farm to table restaurants there too because it's a very umagricultural area and there are a lot of horses as well. So it's really cool.It's just a beautiful part of the country. I did a really good eventthere. I'm sorry You go mary. Kay. No, no, I was going to say tom and I hadyears and years and years ago did a tour of Jack Daniels and the mosttragic thing at the time about jack Daniels is you're walking your up anddown, you're smelling and the town was dry so you did not get to taste or bynow they, I think they've changed the law since then, but that county was dry.So you could buy like Jack Daniels chocolates and you know, all kinds ofstuff, but you could not taste at the time. It was tragic. That's bizarre.Well I was going to say that a really fun event in Louisville with the, withtheir junior early and I can totally see this like this would be really funevent and we should bring all of our husbands because I feel like theyshould have like sort of a support group at this point. You know, sincethis has become like at least half of...

...our life, fiction husband's supportgroup with bourbon. I think it would, I think it's a good, but actually thisworks really well. Our listeners and viewers should actually bring theirhusbands to because they probably have to deal with us every Wednesday night.So they should get some bourbon out of it. We could call them the F and Ffellas. I like it. You're so clever. It's funny you said that Christie aboutthis, the support group and this taking up such a big part of our lives. I had,I have lunch with another Orlando based author yesterday named James Ponti.He's a new york times bestselling middle grade author. He's great. Youknow, I came home and I said to Jason last night, um oh my gosh, it was justso nice to have a conversation with another author and like just to, youknow, to talk about like all the things that were going through and you know,it was just, it was so nice. Like I just forget how nice that is. He's like,you do that 20 times a day with other women. Like when I was like, oh yeah, Iguess I do. I mean, I guess I meant in person and it was like, I just based onwell and also the text, the text chains were on usually have not that much todo with writing, but with other stupid stuff like me waking up what I had likethis morning and assuming that I had a brain tumor and you know, with, with mypublisher, published my book with as many words as I had well. And then like,and who's going to finish the book? I think of that sometimes are like, oh mygosh, I have to finish like I know that this book is not fully fact checked andwhat if they public if I die, they publish it like this. Like do you dothis? Do you do you like put your laptop in your car when you're goingsomewhere and I like position it in the passenger seat on the floor because Ithink if I get rear ended, the laptop is toast so it will survive. I likestrap it into the seat belt so that it will survive if everything else burnsup. How sick is that? We'll ask you about another writer last night. And hesaid it was like, I can't remember what he said, but it was a very specificquestion and I was like, I don't know, we're all a little bit crazy and Ithink that's yeah, pretty much crazier than others. It was not one of y'all psit was not one of y'all Okay, sure. Oh well that was so fun. You guys, I'mstarving. I'm sure y'all are too. So I know I haven't had any wine. Okay. Idid a whole show without a drop of wine and I gotta tell you lady, you're onyour a game. Yeah, you really? Yeah, I mean, I don't know if it was the wineor just your a game, but I don't know, ladies, ladies, those mushrooms, theywere just mushrooms sprouting out of, you know, I began, I'll never donemushrooms, john wine, but I have not done mushrooms. Goodnight, Great jobhosting, Christie. Oh yes, Christine, thanks Emily, wherever you are, you arethe best. Okay, alright, night later. Goodnight. Thanks sean. Yeah, thank you for tuning in, join us everyweek on facebook or Youtube where our live show airs every Wednesday night atseven p.m. Eastern time and please subscribe to our podcast and follow uson instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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