Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode 11 · 1 year ago

Friends and Fiction with Fiona Davis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Fiona Davis joins the Fab Five to discuss her new release THE LIONS OF FIFTH AVENUE, a Good Morning America Book Club Pick. http://www.fionadavis.net

Welcome to friends and fiction. Five best selling authors endless stories. Friends and fiction is a podcast with five best selling novelists whose common love of reading writing in independent bookstores bound them together. With chats, author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing, these friends discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Best Selling Novelists Mary K Andrews, Christen Harmel, Christie Woodson Harvey, Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Monroe are five longtime friends with more than eighty published books to their credit. At the start of the pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour to talk about their books, their favorite bookstores, writing, reading and publishing in this new, unchartered territory. They're still talking and they've added fascinating discussions with other best selling novelists. So joined them live on their friends and fiction facebook group page every Wednesday at seven P M Eastern, or listen in view later at your leisure. Welcome everyone for such a spectacular and special nights to night. This is friends in fiction. Five best selling novelists end list stories. You have no idea the stories we want special this week we are five writers and friends. He's common love of reading, writing and independent bookstores binds us together, along with our love for a few other things like kids, decorating, laughter and supporting each other. And and this is our weekly friends and fictions show. I'm Patti Callihan Henry and I am hosting for our guests tonight, Davis. My latest historical novel is called becoming Mrs Lewis. Hi, and I'm Mary Ellis Monroe and I am the author of on Ocean Boulevard and the rerelease of the Book Club. Hi, I'm Mary Kay Andrews and my latest book is Hello Summer. Hi, I'm Christin Harmel and my latest is the book of last names. I'm Christy Woods and Harvey and my latest book it feels like falling. And as you can see, we have an incredible guest tonight. We are so thrilled to have fumed us to talk about her new book, the Lions of Fifth Avenue, which comes out on August four. But before we get started, we have some really exciting news. Are Christin Harmel's book, the Book of lost names that we have been talking about for a couple weeks and had a big party for last week. Today we found out just hit the New York Times list. We're sping ex DA. I know there's a whole show to do, because I just say it, I'll post this on the page too, but thank you, thank you. Thank you so much to all of you who supported it, who read it, who've said Nice things, who've showed up every week. I it's friends and fiction, you guys. It's the friends and fiction magic. Thank you. We love you. Were proud of you and that I look. It's a powerful book. Man, we're so exact. So let's talk about Fiona. So Fiona and I first met at a book festival in Atlanta, Georgia, for remember of you, outside it was about a hundred and ten degrees. But I met her through her work long before then. Wait, do you guys remember? Book Festivals? Like something from another time, I believe, the dream of life before covies, when we didn't even know the word covid or social distancing in the bathoms wearing a mask except in a hospital. Well, things have changed in a blink, but Fiona's powerful work only gets better. This. Second time we met was in New York City at Grand Central Station for Martini. So yes, I feel like it fell into one of her historical novels and it was quite grand. So I'm thrilled she's here with us. So let me just give you a brief bio about Fiona. She is not the character and Shrek and that began her career in New York City as an actress, where she worked on Broadway, off Broadway and in regional theater. After getting a Master's degree at Columbia Journalism School, which sounds like maybe one of fewer characters. Say Yeah, without giving anything away, she fell in love with writing, leap frogging from editor to freelance journalists before finally settling down as an author of historical fiction. Fiona's books have been translated into more than a dozen languages. She's a graduate of the College of William and Mary and is based in New York City, which is where she is right now. Lions of Fifth Avenue is her fifth...

...novel, and my Right, is it the fifth? Yes, and is set in the New York City Public Library. Each of her historical novels are set in a historical building in New York, and let me remind you that if you have a question for Fiona, we're going to be pulling some lives probing the post it during our friends and fit fiction facebook page and we'll pull them. But before we get started, I also want to remind you that one of the reasons we all got started on this endeavor is our love for independent book stores. As you all know, all of us at friends and fiction are passionate supporters of booksellers. Each week we highlight one indie bookseller and tonight Fiona chose it for us, and it is called books on the common in Connecticut, and they are graciously giving you ten percent off the books and the link to the book store is posted on the friends and fiction book page and Fiona has left signed copies there for you lucky viewers. So, Fiona, welcome. Thank you all. Going to talk about our week, but first we want to know how have you been doing during this crazy pandemic time? Like the rest of us at friends and fiction, your book tour got canceled or postponed for the lines of Fifth Avenue. So where have you been spending your time and how is it not being on the road for this incredible novel. Tell us what's going on. You know, I have to say the team at Detton, my publishers, my agent, they really mobilized in as early as March, in April, and so even though there's not a physical book toward the virtual book tour is incredible and I'm talking with lots of wonderful people and other authors for the neck for pretty much all of August and I can't wait because even though it is virtual, you're still making contact with readers and I think that's so important. I will miss the signing line, you know. Yeah, usually you have a couple of minutes with someone, but but they'll come back. So in the meantime we're figuring it out. And where have you been spending most of it? Have you been in the city this whole time or if you've been able to get away? You know, I'm very lucky where last April I bought a house just a little north of the city. It's a s farmhouse. It's just a perfect getaway. So I have gotten away and I've spent a lot of time there. I come into the city every so often to catch up on things, but it's really lovely. It's got a pond and a Hammock, and so I work and then I go reread in the Hammock. And you know, we're very, very lucky as writers that we work from home. So things haven't changed in terms of that. And Yeah, I've just been soaking up every minute of the the countryside. That's amazing for you. So, before we dive into our questions for Fiona, Kristen has a special welcome to some other unseen guests tonight. Christine, want to tell us. Yeah, thank you, Patty. I don't think we say it enough, but we are so grateful to facebook for providing this platform where we can all connect this way. I mean without facebook I don't think we would have friends and fiction, at least not on this scale, and so we wanted to say thanks for that. And in addition to welcoming our friends and fiction members tonight, which are Fourteenzero of you. Now, I can't believe it. We put fourteen thousand like what is happening. But in addition to that, we also wanted to say a big hello and welcome to anyone watching tonight on books and Facebook, which is a big page run by facebook itself. So if you're catching us there, and you love books. We hope you will join us over here at friends and fiction to thanks love. So, Fianna, we each have a question for you, but before we shoot those at you, tell us about the lions of Fifth Avenue. We call it the dreaded elevator pitch, but it can be like a really long elevator, like the kind that goes to the top of the Empire Student Ring. So take the time you need, but tell us a little bit about the book before we dive into our questions. Sor Yeah, so I write books that are set in New York City landmarks, and this one said at the New York Public Library, and it's in two timelines. So in one thousand nine hundred and thirteen it's from the point of view of a woman named Laura who lives inside the the Public Library and a seven room apartment that actually existed, with her husband, who's the superintendent, and their kids and she's lives in this apartment surrounded by all this knowledge, but she wants something more out of life and so she applies to Columbia Journalis from school, and that this is back in one thousand nine hundred and thirteen. It was in its second year of existence and she gets in our and her world is really blown wide open. And then the other timeline is in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three, from the point of view of Sadie, who's a curator in a special rare book collection in the library that actually exists, called the burke collection, and she is putting on an exhibit of rare books and one goes missing and she's kind of drawn into this series of book that's that occurred eighty years ago, as well as a tragedy that happened to the superintendence family back then. And I like to say it's about the magic of the written word and the power of women's voices. Beautiful.

Oh good, so I get to go first because I'm the host tonight, and so I want to ask you what we have been asking all of our guests and what we've asked each other too. So I'm going to ask you strayed away. How was reading and writing valued in your home growing up? Do you think it had anything to do with you becoming a writer? Was it's a home where it was encouraged or discouraged? What were the values around all of that when you were blowing up that's such a great question. I I've never been asked that before. Yeah, you know, we moved around a lot when I was a kid and the one constant was going to the library. And every week my mother would put me in my brother in the car and we go to the library and he'd go to the train section and I would go to horses and and Judy Bloom and and we would take out three or four books each and come home and sit and read. And we're really a family that when we all get together, we sit in the same room and read quietly and and so it was very valued and I was just enraptured by books early on and that just never changed. I think it's I love the question because it gives us such insight into the kind of writers we are, how we grow up. Okay, Mary K Andrews, I know you have a question and take it away, baby. I do. You know, I'm always interested, Fiona in process, and so my question was, do you have a list of New York City buildings that intrigue? You mean, I know you have set stories and iconic places like the Dakota where John and Oka, John and Yoko, lived at the time twister. Yeah, John and Yoko and the Chelsea Hotel where lots of scintillating stories habit barbason is. The more you know, this is like a three part question. I'm hogging all the time, but that's okay, you do. Yeah, is the Lions the first book you've set in a non residential talk building? I mean, I know you said that there was an apartment there, but is this a little bit of a departure? Not really the the third book that took place at Grand Central Terminal was said in a place that was in the residence, but it's set at the art school that was there, called the Grand Central School of art. And you know, I'm always looking for the surprise in each landmark because I know that's what readers will be drawn to. And so the fact that there was this amazing art school in in Grand Central that was there for twenty years, had nine hundred students a year. That to me was I thought, okay, that's okay, it's all right that there's no one living there, because my first thought was with I have like a commuter fall in love with a train conductor, you know, and so once I figured that out, it was fine. But yeah, most of them have been residential, which is so much easier because you can have a crazy cast of characters really bang into each other easily when they all live in the building. And do you start with a protagonist in her story or in move her into the setting, or do you have the setting first and then figure it out? I usually start with the setting and do a lot of research. And with the New York Public Library, when I was doing a deep dive into the New York Times archives and I found this article that was written on the retirement of the superintendent and it talked about how he lived in the family, with his family in the building, how his daughter was born in the library, and this is back in nineteen the nineteen pens, and that the kids used to play baseball in the library using books as bass until they got caught. And and you know, it's those things that I'm here. You find that that is you're researching something just just sparks you and sparks often and you're off and running on on and then I thought, okay, it's this different ten it's family. Whose point of view? And I immediately thought the wife. You know, what was she thinking? And because I'm interested in the way women look at the world and how that's changed over time or not amazing. I kind of got chills last that, Mary Alice. Yeah, that actually feeds into my next question, and that is that when you you usually most of your books the addressed, the doll house, the masterpiece and, of course, the you can struct your novels around the lies of two women, one from a past pasked era and one from relatively modern era. And these women, I think, are very strong, there forward thinking, and yet they have struggles and they're struggling against economics, the either the constraints of economics, as well as restrictions of who women are in that period of time. Mystery seen as a secret that has to be unraveled. So I look at your books as part social history, part mystery and hear Andy for those of us who love historical building, and I think...

...that's a winning combination. So my question is, what inspired you to come up with this framework, this format and and as an acide, let me just say big Kudos to you for stard review on your very first now that's pretty impressive. Thank you. Thank you so much. You know, I think I started writing the books I hadn't written anything. I'd been a journalist and I had this idea around writing a book about the Barbazon Hotel for women only, because I wanted to read it, you know, and I was in my mid S. I hadn't written a book ever before. I didn't think I was the type of person to write a book, but this story just stuck with me and I had I had to try. And I just love dual timeline books there there, I'm always drawn to them. They're my favorite, and so I thought, Oh, I'll do a dual timeline. That'll be fun. If I had any idea how hard it is. What aboot? It's crazy, and then throwing a mystery on top of it. I mean there are days that my head is just spinning and I have to go and eat a lot of cheese in order to once I got known for the dual timeline landmark building, I was like, all right, let's do it, and so every books it's a real joy because I am being I am able to show how things have changed over time or not. Like my character Laura in the ten s gets drawn into this club called the Heterodoxy Club, and it's a real club that was founded by this feminist organizer and in the s. They were talking about things like women's rights, birth control, the right to vote of course, even free love, and these are things that we associate s and s really, and so the idea that this was a discussion going on at that time, I thought, oh, that's great, I have to tap into that and show that. And so that's half the fun is showing how things have changed or not, and the dual timeline really does help with that. Yeah, but the Barbazon was that was a team spot and we all, a lot of us, wanted to know what it was like. So I it's a book and I desire to look at other historic buildings. Oh, I may have missed the question. It was breaking up a little bit. I was so I did. That's coming death. Am I gone? Am I gone? Who? We can tell you out of it? Well, this is probably a good time for me to say I have to go. And Fiona, I am a big fan and it's been an honor to meet you and love to everyone tonight. Likewise, reality the rest of the time. Thank you. Buy and the good timeline thing is so much harder than you think it is when you my God so much. It's my last the one my ma comes out of March. Just dual timeline, and I ask these women can attest? I almost abandoned it at least three or four times. Yeah, the last two I did, not this year's book, but the high tide club and Sunset Beach. I had dual timelines and honestly, I really thought this is a this is the end, I'm done. And what's great about your books is there's such a great plot. Twists, you know, that surprised the reader and that's what I love as well, where you know you're going in one direction and suddenly something's revealed. The plot was surprised me, to believe me. And so what did olines? You have to be so careful that you don't give away too much in one timeline that don't affect the other. Oh and they you don't talk about it before. The Modern Day timeline knows about it, but then do it. Christen just did it too. Yes, it's Chris, and don't go. I know you have a great question here for it. Oh me, I'm sorry, I was thinking Christie was next. Okay, so, Fiona, you and I have done a couple of virtual events together already and we still have at least one more to go, which I'm so excited about. Are you guys jealous? I get to hang out with her? God, yeah, it's so jelly. You bring us with you. I don't know you do you know? You know what our event is. It's as Kiahoka County Library. So you guys tell my sure Ron Block would have us to all be there when you're on bead. All right, we're all interview. But so, Fiona, you and I have a lot in com and, I think, as do our books. But one of the things that has really struck me is that for both of us individually, we reach this moment in our careers wherein we must have just felt like time to deliver and owed two books and to the people who love them, including booksellers and Librarians. Can you talk a little bit about why this was that moment for you? Why are books and those who love them so deserving of a sweeping story like yours? And I also have to say before you answer, I truly think this book is going to be a game changer for you. This book is so good and I hope that, I just hope everybody in...

...the world goes out and reads it. I mean I've read it, I've blurbed it, I loved it. But anyhow, on with the question. I Apologize Right back at you. Congratulations on the New York Times in your book. I was just someone was just I was filling out of Qa for something today and they were saying, what's the last book that made you cry, and I said Yours, give me the chosen cry, and in the best way. So, yeah, so, so, as I was researching this book, I've learned about this librarian named Jean Ashton and she had been at Columbia University's Butler Library in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four when there was a series of book thefts that happened over a period of three months. One point eight million dollars of rare books and manuscripts were stolen at that time and no one could figure out how the thief was getting in and out, and I did an interview with her to find out. You know, what was it like? How are you feeling? Was the staff turning on each other? And she talked about how, after they caught the thief, she went before the judge and said we need to give him a harsher sentence, and she made this really passionate plea. That was in the court transcripts and she said, look, these books aren't just x number of pages, work x, they are really a piece of Western history and culture and the loss would cause irreparable damage for scholarly research. and She described libraries as being the safekeepers of these artifacts of the past and that the value of these artifacts fluctuates like something that wasn't worth much, you know, a hundred years ago, like women's diaries or records of slave transactions. Today are really valuable because our way of thinking has evolved. And she explained all this to the judge and he was so moved that he granted a harsher sentence and later in two thousand and two they passed the cultural heritage resources law that said that if you stole anything from a library or a museum, you would get a harsher sentence. And so to me she's a real hero in so many ways and I just wanted to pay tribute to her in the book, and so in my character Sadie, that sort of gets pulled into the storyline. Awesome, it's amazing and I have to say, oh, go ahead, would you say this? I would just think she does it so well and just in awe of her book and the research that went into it. I'm totally team Kyona well and in reading it, because there's this great mystery at its core. It's one of those books that you're reading it and you're thinking about it during the day completely. I wonder what's going to happen next. Where is I don't want to give too much away, but there's some stolen books in there that will make you really think about what books mean to you. Are they going to find it, Christy? Well, that was such a good lead into my next question, and these were so well organized, Pattie. But it probably goes without saying that setting a book in one of the world's most famous libraries would be a dream for any of us. And you've talked a little bit about your research now, but was there anything surprising or any surprising stories that emerged for you while you were researching this book? Yeah, sure so. One of the things that was I was really lucky, was that there's something called the Alan Room at the New York Public Library where, if you have a book contract, you can apply to work in that room and if you need books, they get delivered to your bookshelf and it's right there, you know, a book on the construction of the library or or typhoid in the ten S and and so I was able to do that, which was terrific. And also they had all the archives from the the superintendent in the ten so I could look at the payroll and see who worked for him and how much did they get paid, what were his duties and those details, I think, really go to make historical fiction work. But the most fun was dealing with the the librarians there, who answered all of my questions and we're so helpful. And at one point in an early draft there was a dead body in my book and it's not there now, but there was a dead body and I actually emailed the librarian and said, you know, you've probably never been asked this before, but if you had to hide a dead body in the library, where would you put it? And she wrote back with a wonderful location. And now I figured it out on the on the floor plan and I was up and running and she is. She said, yes, no one has ever asked me that and they are now both being questioned by the NYPD. Someone at the library rank is minute. Hope that's another fun part of the book is that you've learned about all these. I didn't realize that a whole section of the New York Public Library is under Brian Park. Yes, yeah, so. So they have the roast reading room, which is that beautiful room at the very top, and underneath it are the stacks and those are all the stacks of books and it's seven layers and you're not allowed in there. It's very you know that the new public library...

...is not a library where you can take out books. It's only research. You can only keep them in. So you order a book up top and then it gets sent it to you on a trolley these days, up in the rose reading room. But they needed more room, and so Brian Park is this huge park that extends beyond in the back of it and underneath it they dug and created two more levels of storage underneath their which is just incredible. Is that what they did? After they had that big stink about getting rid of the stacks and the main library, they did Bryan Park before along a number of years ago, a couple of decades ago. So that was done. Yeah, and recently there was a talk of removing the stacks and I think things are still being negotiated because they don't want to change the inherit structure of the building. It's so loved. Right, I know. I remember there was a huge controversy about and I remember board members were at each other's throats. It was really it was kind of a sad but fascinating story. And in New York, where you have these old buildings and then things change and do you change them over time or do you keep them the same? And that that's what's so interesting about the landmarks in New York. Yeah, pappy, I kept marry Kay. It feels like that's a book you should write the the stacks choking around with an early title. That we'd have a very book, some woman on the cover and call it stacked. Now for our Patty commercial break. To remind you about our bookstore of the week, which is books on the Commons. Each book you buy at an Indie is a good deed and at the same time you get a great new book to Read, plus you get to keep the literary community thriving. It is a win win when during this crazy time. So if you're interested in picking up one of our new releases tonight, please take advantage of the great ten percent off that books on the common and Connecticut. The link is on our facebook page with the PIONA announcement. And don't forget that PIONA's books will be signed. So now the four of us have had a chance to ask Piana some questions and we love to let you do the same. We've chosen three, no do from among the questions on our facebook page and while we're talking, if you have something you'd like to ask, post it and we'll pull a couple live ones. So, Mary Hay, you want to pull one we pulled. Yeah, Donna Mischane. Michean Rydell wants to know, Fiona, why are most of your books set on New York famous buildings? And she says she probably knows you get this assis all the time. She'd seen your interview with Kristen and and wanted you to know it was awesome. Why Not Restaurants, Fiona? But again, yes, yeah, so. So, when I'm was a kid, my parents are both English and we would go back to England every few years to visit relatives and we would go and visit all the relatives all over, from Scotland Down to London and back up, and my brother and I would start fighting in the rental car and so my parents would pull over at whatever castle we were passing our ruin and let us get out and run around. And I just loved how old everything was. I was really taken by the idea that anything less than four hundred years old out there is pretty recent and and I just loft imagining the ghosts that wandered the halls or what was it like for a servant girl. And I think when I started writing books that's what I tapped into as a just a way to create a framework to base the story on, and I love doing the research into the history. So it's a mix of being a real building Geek, I think, and and loving loving old buildings. When I was working on Mrs Lewis that the building that he taught in was called the new building, like the new building on campus, and it was built in the late sixteen hundreds. Here's a little bit different, since we lost our beloved Mary Alice. Mary Kay, do you want to ask the question we have polden. Yeah, Stephanie Bowen, Stephanie Brown loves your cover. She says they're absolutely amazing. They always grab her attention before she even reads them and she's also a library lover. She wants to know what your favorite libraries are to visit. What was your Favorite Library Book as a child? I would say one of my favorite books as a child was, is it the mystery of Roger Akroid by Agatha Christie? Oh, wow, because she she I loved Agatha Christie, and so the idea that she just broke all the rules with that book in a way I just, you know, to me that was incredible. And again, the idea that she's ahead of me and I have to try and figure out what the clues are and what what are the Red Herrings? It felt like a real, you know, an exercise in reading, which I enjoyed. And Yeah, I would say my favorite libry is definitely the New York Public Library. I've been in New York, or...

...now, for thirty years and you know, I went to it when I was an actress and we were, you know, doing costumes for a show and back then you didn't have the Internet and you would go to the library to their picture collection and you could pull out pictures of, okay, what's what's ninety fifty s stresses to get a sense of what what the period should be, and so I've been using it in a different aspects for four decades now and and it's my favorite. Lucky you. Well, I want to know everybody's favorite. Firstly, can you think of your first favorite library book? The bookmobile? Yeah, growing up in St Pete I was one, the second oldest of five kids in the the big main library was way across town and my mom had five little kids and at that time she didn't even have a car. She had a golf cart because my dad sold golf carts. Now is all on a golf cart. We would go up to the shopping center and you would check out. Once a month the bookmobile came to the shopping center. We check out the maximum number of books you were allowed and when we got off the tires would rise because there were six of us, including my mom. How funny. How about you, Christian Vie, Remember Library or library book? Either Library Books? I think I just made my way through the whole Bob's twin and Nancy drew series and hearty boys. But the old ones, like the ones from the the whenever, whenever they first came out, the S or s or whatever, like, not the new ones with the fancy covers. So those all came from the library. Gosh, library, I guess. I mean it would have been a worthing to know Hio, because I didn't move to staint Pete until I was ten. So yeah, Gosh. I mean I remember going to the library. I remember always having library books. I don't even remember the name of the library anymore. How horrible is that? No, it's not horrible, just I mean, when you're a kid, what do you don't think about the name? Oh, it's just a place with all the library yeah, yeah, this is probably not like my first favorite, but I remember how I remember being so excited when I got old enough to sort of graduate from the Little Kid Room at the library and you got to go upstairs where the older books were, and I remember like going and reading every single sweet valley twin book and then like a working up to sweet valley high and then there were like I was pretty young, like I certainly wasn't in high school or anything. I'm probably wasn't even in middle school, and I remember there were a couple like the last two, that my mom would not let me read because they were like super racy and hi. And then I remember being like in college and somebody talked about it and I was like, you know what, I never read those last year sweet valley books and going back and reading them and being like hmmm, that's so great, interesting, that's funny. But yeah, I just remember that so well and like okay, I've read seven, let's eight, you know, just like going through are like I've read eight and nines checked out. Oh No, for me, I remember so distinctly we used to spend I grew up up north, most y'all know that, and I we spend our summers in Cape Cod and I remember the Cape Cod Library way more than I remember any library at school. And The library at school I remember hiding in during lunch hour because I didn't want to find a seat at the lunch table and or figure out who to sit with. And but the one in Cape Cutty is to get in trouble for bringing my books back with sand in them. Oh, remember getting in loads that vieers with sweet balley. Mine was Nancy drew to Christian and check them off one one right after the other. Okay, Christie, you want to pull up a couple live questions? Yes, do we want live questions just for Fiona or do we want live questions for all of us? We have time whenever. You pick whatever you okay, well, I'll do one for all of us and then one for Fionna. Okay, so Sharia ask this one. I really, really like this one and I think we've all written dul timeline. And so she said. Do you write one timeline at a time or do you write both at the same time? So let's maybe throw that to Fiona first. Yeah, so I write the old Tuk, the older timeline first and then I do the new timeline. Oh Wow, you know what about you potty? You do them separately, Fiona, like completely separately. Yeah, I've outline them, so I know where they each have to go, but I'll do the old one first and then do the new ones. A new one tends to be a little shorter. Yeah, yeah, actually, can I ask a follow up question to that? Fear and as so. So, do you have to do a lot of editing then to weave them together? You know, because I've outlined them carefully beforehand. It's not that bad, but I have to do a lot of edilate editing because my first drafts are so awful. My joke there has to be ten revisions on top of it. But but work in the story together usually is pretty pretty much in place, although there's always changes, as you know. Yes,...

Yep, I am about you, Patty. Sorry, yeah, no, that was going to yet you read my vibe. That's what's starting to happen to all of us. It's really great. Yes, I write them at the same time. I have a vague outline of where it's going and sometimes I'll get carried away. I'll find I really know where the historical timeline is going, and so I'll do a bunch of chapters, but I eventually try to catch up with my modern timeline. I think about as a better outliner I wouldn't have to do that, but so maybe that's what I'll try next time. But I do them simultaneously so that I can see see where it's going, but it sounds easier to outline it. I find I use the wrong name if I do it back and forth. I'll use such interesting protactus is in my head and so I'll use the wrong that's hard to search and replace. Why don't do them on the same day? But I do kind of, because then I would not to do that too but how about you, Christi, because you just did it. Yeah, I write. I started chapter one and go straight through to the end, which means that I'm writing past and present one after each other or one after another, and I think I figure it all out the outline. So the stories feel separate to me, but I think at that like when I'm writing the outline, I'm thinking in terms of the character separate journeys. But once I have those journeys set, I think in the writing I'm thinking about what's the arc of the book, and so I'm right. It makes sense in a linear way to write them because they're all propelling the book forward the same way. Does that make sense? And you I'm the Queen of chaos brain and I am not a good outliner. And so with the PAT the the two that I did with a dual timeline, I don't know what I was doing. I would ping pong back and forth between the, you know, the past timeline and the current one, and then I would get myself in trouble and I think, Oh my God, I don't know. I had a World War Two flyer guy in the high tide club and he needed yeah, it was. I have so much respect for all of you who do this on a regular basis, because I backed into it, I did. I really just thought, Oh, Yo, have this old you know, I'll have this old back backstory and it's way more than a best story. I think I only book that didn't have a dual timeline. Is feels like falling. Maybe maybe Dear Carolina didn't, but I've always written them. You know, it's at the stories just always really sort of flowed from one to the next to the next, and I do not outline, so that's kind of a disaster. But I'm working on my first I've written about, you know, a historical time period but with a fictional character before, and that seemed to just flow really easily. But I'm writing about my first real historical characters and that has been a little more I don't know if I'm just like uptight about it because I've never done it so I'm like stressed out about it. But I've written like the first two hundred pages and then like the last fifty pages, but it's like I have fifty in here and I'm trying to but none of the character stories are complete. So I think that's what I was like, okay, I need to. I know I don't normally do that, but I think I just need to go a back through each character storyline and like write that one extra chapter. It's really weird. That's never happened to me before, but it's like I know the beginning and I know the end and it's like just that one pivotal moment and I like can't decide what it's going to be for all of them. So it's all got it. Like you guys flight a Bible for these dual timelines. Yeah, I write notes in my outline. I'll I'll write notes with like birthdates and you know, these are the names I'll have. Like if I have a big group of people that I have to keep track of the characters, I'll make lists of the character names, which I guess is sort of a Bible, but it's a very casual, abbreviated Bible that just gets cut and pasted into my own. We should probably explain what a Bible is. It doesn't the key games version and then they're but don't describe what you meant. Well, you know, I'm the worst one to tell about it because I we don't I remember to do it. You know, two thirds of the way through when I'm totally lost. A sort of just like a it's like a what would you call it? A guide book that says he here's who your characters are. Maybe you have their family history, how old they are, what they do, what maybe what their relationship is to the protagonist. You might put in some stuff about the settings, the timeline, the time frame of the book, that kind of stuff. That kind of stuff, for me shows up in the outline. And I started three because you do it outline. Start and Catty,...

...you know this, and then we're going to go to the next question. I started about three books ago using scrivener when I start writing and then be only you know, when you scrippner, everything can go in there and whenever in that check. I know it's so great startle fiction because you can be working on something and thankful. I need to see a photo of the dress she's wearing and with one click it's up. Yep and wow, and you can even put the you can even vertical it so the dress is next to what you're writing. Yes, Oh, I might need to do that. Yeah, I'm not using that that and maybe I need to crater. Mrs Lui I haven't. Everything I've written since then has been on scrivener. But, Christie, what's the next question? And then we'll come. That's all. We just did a whole writing tip. This one is amazing. Rose de looach wants to know what happened to the wine drinking. Oh, the wine drinking out our show. Yeah, well, I am drinking deer park because I am in the hall at Summer Camp. What, guys? We're at family camp this week. So that's where I am. So no alcohol at Camp. I are sponsorably as water and green team. Yes, I'm also sponsored by deer park water, but I'm a green team, Green Team Nice, go green team. I have to tell you I'm drinking the Champagne Christie sent me a week ago because she was so sure I was going to hit the New York Times list the dead. I sent it to her and I said put this in your freeze, you and your friend, so that you can pop it when you find out that you hit the Times list. Oh it's awesome. Every friends and fiction an episode. We try to give you a writing tip, although we just gave you a writing class. But for all the writers out there tonight, we thought you might not want to hear any more from us and you might want to hear some wisdom from Fiona so pion. Know. What tip do you have for those running to write a novel? I would say don't ever think it's too late. It doesn't matter if you're thirty or forty or fifty. You know, for me, I didn't start drafting my first book until I was in my mid S and published it at forty nine and now I'm in my early, third early s, the sick forty nine or thirty nine, forty ninety nine, you know, I'm in my early s and you know, I couldn't have written these books twenty years ago. I didn't have the life experiences and I didn't have the vocabulary and I didn't have just the inner life of betrayal and training and you know, just just the things that you go through as you live. And so I'd say don't feel like because you're, you know, in your s or s, that it's over because it's your s or your or seven. Some of US are in their S. yeah, and it's never too late to have a story that you just love and feel like you need to put it on the page. Yeah, I'm so glad to hear you say that because I think, as women, were so often taught that age is something we have to overcome or feel badly about, and in fact it's an asset and it should always be an asset and we should always just look at every year we live is something that makes us a better person and a stronger person, a better better what we do and who we are. So that that is great life advice as well as great writing advice. I think about the remember that book oldest living confederate widow tells all. Yeah, I think that Lady, I think that author was in her s when the end it was her first book, when it was Polish. And also, I think that Hans to or rings true to also the mentors of older you know. You know when I was in my early s and wanted write my first novel. You know the wisdom of someone who's already written a few. There's yeah, it's never, never, ever too late. So we also like to suggest every week we like to throw out books that were each reading or talk about debuts. So, Christie, I know you wanted to tell us about a book that you were reading. Did and, y'all, I was so I remembered to pack it and brought it to camp. Did Not bring it into the hall with me tonight, but the book I wanted to talk about was Louisiana lucky. Oh, do you have it? Thank goodness. I mean we say each other and we do. We really dare really did, by Julie Pannell and it is actually launching the same day as Fiona's beautiful new book, August fourth. It is just it's summer. It's such a charming and fun story. It's a perfect way to end your summer. Unfortunately I don't want to be in our summer. But it's about three sisters who hit the Jack Cotton big time in the lottery and the ways that their lives...

...change for better and and they're really unexpected ways to and sort of their relationships underlying at all. Just loved it. It was so fun. I Love Julie. She's amazing and I've loved all her books, but on this is just it's so charming. You love it. That's awesome, Fiona. He said you want to tell us about something you're reading? Yeah, well, there's something that's actually coming out September one. So I have a galley which doesn't have the gorgeous cover. It has a gorgeous cover and it's called fifty words for rain by Ashull Lemmy, am Ie, and it's her debut and it's so beautifully written in it's post World War to Japan from the point of view of a young girl who's half black and half Japanese, and it's just a story like I've never read before. It's really unique. So yeah, fifty words for rain by Ashton Lemmy comes out September one. It sounds awesomehow that's great. Anybody else? I do have one I didn't tell you about. Will tell us now. This is called this is another daybu novel and it's called the second home by Christine Paint See, and I have just gotten am already loving it. Oh Wow, I told that that cover. That is such a cool cover too. Great Cover, quite beautiful the bar. You can tell Pattie and I are in the throws. Were so because we're like, let me see the cover again. Yeah, so I wanted to tell you all about a book coming out in about two weeks. It's called the comeback by a woman named Ella Burnon and it is a debut, and I mean right now. Getting word out about a debut. I can't imagine in this world not visiting. So it's about I think this sounds so fascinating. It's about a young movie star who left Hollywood when her career was on an upswing and now as she is returning one year later to face the manipulative film director who controlled her life. So it sounds a little rich from the press. This is the cover. Oh Wow, yeah, very timely. I know it's going to sound rip from the headlines. Yes, yes, so we have some really exciting things happening here at friends and fiction, so we want to tell you about some of them before we sign off tonight. So don't leave because it's announcement time, because we have this killer fall schedule coming and you're going to want to hear about it. But, Mary Kay, want to tell us what's next for us? Well, you know, we've been building up to this, and what's next for the friends and fiction ladies is a podcast. There will be more coming on that soon, but we wanted to know, we wanted you to know that next week, when we have Ellen Hildebrand with us, we'll be telling you all about it. So stay tuned and to hear all the details. About our friends and fiction podcast that we've been planning in secret? Yeah, we have lots of secret things planning in secret, except it's been part of our intro for so sneaky that we've accidentally been running friends in fiction is a podcast for the last like five weeks. Whoops. We're so we have grets. We're just not very good at keeping them right. Can't be dressed with anything. Yes, what's going on with the Book Club? Sure, what's that? Because you're hon this month for the book. Yeah, so the friends and Fiction Book Club so fun. It's run by two of our members, Brenda Gardner and Michelle Marcus, and I think they're over a thousand member strong now. I will post the link again tonight. It's just friends and fiction, official Book Club, Super Easy to find. Every month they read a book by one of the friends and fiction authors, and this month I'm lucky enough that they're reading the book of Lost Names, my book, and so I will be joining them August seventeen for a chat where you can ask me any questions you have about the book, including spoilers. We do spoilers over there, Mary Kay, you did it last month with them by good. Yet it's I think it's just a great place to discuss a book in depth. And so right now again, book a last names look for the friends and Fiction Book Club. So the last, well, second to last, piece of exciting news is is that we are willing to start a friends and fiction and newsletter, because we plan to send a few short and sweet blasts out each month and they will be shop full of exclusive content. We're going to have separate interviews with our authors, we're going to give you sneak peaks of things, we're going to have cover reveals, will have bonus content, offers from our booksellers, recipes, goodies, all of that stuff. So, starting right now, literally right now, someone's posting it on our facebook page, you can sign up to receive our emails. To subscribe. What you do is you go to friends and fictioncom or and hover over contact at the top of the...

...page and then choose the newsletters sign up. We've also shared the link on our friends and fiction page. But we are so excited about our newsletter because we're always trying to tell you all so many things and it tends to get lost sometimes on the facebook page. So we'll be sending out newsletters so nothing gets lost and you know what's coming up and you know who our guests are and we'll have secret interviews that aren't so secret, just like our podcast, and photos and photos. Sneaky, so sneaky. So, Christy, tell us a little bit about what we have come up in the fall. My Gosh, we have the most raising fall schedule. I'm just gonna tell you about a few of our incredible guests. August five, next week we have Allen Hildebrand and I'm going to be hosting. I'm so excited. And then August twelve will have Karen Slaughter, August Nineteen Christina Mc Morris, September two, e tough room, September night Emily Iffen, September Sixteen signey Pike and September thirty Cathy Reichs. So we have the best guests coming up and we do have many more months of them planned, but that's probably about as much as you can handle right now. So the the long and short of it is be here every Wednesday at seven or you're going to be missing out. Thank you, every dog y'all and Fiona, thank you so much for being with us. They are gods bakings. Thank you. I realized I haven't shown the cover, so I'll do it's so gorgeous. To gorgeous cover. I just want to thank you so much. It's like being part of the cool crowd. This is like my dream. So thank you so much for me and for everything you're doing for authors in this time. You're creating such a valuable services. Really appreciate it. You know, why you think think you're cool, is because we're library door like you are. Noo. We're all our own kind of cool. But your cover is gorgeous. I love how they have the lab. Oh and last week I totally messed up the names of the Lions. So you tell us, Fiona, what are the name of the two lions in front of the New York Public Library? Their patience and fortitude, which none of us have. So thanks for coming tonight, y'all. I know we could talk for hours. Thank you, Fiona. We could may not be ring them all of you. We are thrilled that you spend your Wednesday nights with us and listen to us on our website. You are the reason we keep coming back. Good night everyone, good night. Thank you. Thank you. You're in anybody. We order that book, order the book from Book Out Porters Right now, right now, let's do it. Bye, bye, okay, that was so great. That was okay. How great is she sys something? Seriously, this this is such a great book. I mean I hope everyone runs out buys it, because it is. I've read it back in January and then I didn't have that with her right after and I felt like I was hanging out with a rock star, like the book was that good and just blew me away. Okay, well, we casually mentioned, and you know, we could have talked to her for hours, but about the change in women's you know, the way they look at the world in this book, the way that she shows and it makes you wonder what would I have thought in nineteen ten? What I have had the courage? I know that both you, Mary Kay, and you, Chris, who both went to journalism school in Nineteen ten. Would you have done it too? Oh, that's right, all three of you did. I went to nursing school, but you probably did in nineteen ten. So y'all just didn't. You know, would you have done it? I don't know. If I love the historical fiction makes us ask those kind of questions. Yeah, we're doing an after show. You want to commute everyone on and hi, Sweetie A, Megan. I Love I'll be back up. That was the best all the episode. Em Oh yeah, cammeout anyway. Thanks, y'all. I think it was great tonight. Can we talk about I don't know, if I don't know if y'all remember, but Christen hit the New York Times lest day. Someone we know New York Times less. Yeah, that was pretty cool and if you haven't already gotten that, you know you could go to our bookstore of the week and order it and then you could be as cool as all the people who are already we'd have already read it and can keep it on the New York Times best seller list and you could go on an online review site. There are many, and you could give it a great review, as we all...

...have. You know someone, yes, like we have. We have done that, which is so awesome. Thank you, but you guys, I didn't hit it. We did, like it was. I just feel like it was such a team effort and it was. I feel like it shouldn't even just say my name on the cover. It should just say the friends and fiction officers, because we all, you all got behind it so much and I appreciate that. And and if anyone's looking for it, I it is still out of stock and so many places, but it should be back in stock by the middle of next week. So, which feels like a hundred years. Stop you from ordering it? Absolutely? Yeah, yes, if you were like Amazon, for example, is saying one to two months of talking to be one to two months. So right. It's also a really good lesson about why we're always like, pre order the book, Pre Order the book, because then all of a sudden the publishers like, we didn't know that they were going to sell this many and then there's no books and nobody can get the book. So great thing. Yeah, I know. And the other thing is that people probably don't realize it's a pre a pre order campaign really gives writers publisher the idea that that there is buzz behind a book, that the book is going to is you know, it's going to be great, and then they they do more for the book, they do more promotion, they may order another extra printing. So all of that stuff is means a lot, a lot for somebody with a book about to come out. So we all thank you. Those of you who are early birds we love you. Yeah, we do appreciate yeah, thank you all. All right, you guys. It's so good to see faces. So celebrate. I'M gonna go to there's some kind of camp activity going on right now that I'm going to go to. Forget. You're on the green team. Exactly, my dear part. Yes, sponsored by Dear Green Team and going to take it all. I don't know what the Green Teams gonna do. or I mean we just got here, so I don't know what we're going to do, but the green team is going to rocket. I hope you're grades. Yep, I'm sure we will. There is a New York Times forwards your time. There's a talent show Christian. Maybe we could have you like come on and like read a chapter. I'm sure the kids would love that. Mom's like, I don't know how you do a talent show without wine. Chris, no, I know. I mean we don't know what's in that. We don't know what's in the deer park bottle either. This could be a special dear now, I haven't even breaken like you in your Park Vodka. I don't know. Yeah, all right, guys, I gotta Fun. I'm good night. You all. I love y'All. You've been listening to the friends and fiction podcast. Be Sure to subscribe to the friends and fiction podcast wherever you listen and, if you're enjoying it, leave a review. You can find the friends and fiction authors at www and fictioncom, as well as on the facebook group page friends and fiction. Come back soon. Okay, there are still lots of books, writing tips, interviews, publishing news and bookstores to chat about. Goodbye,.

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