Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 3 months ago

Friends & Fiction with Lian Dolan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Four welcome Lian Dolan in their first show of the Spring/Summer 2022 season. They chat all about Lian's latest book LOST AND FOUND IN PARIS, her research process, character development and bringing the Parisian stting alive. They also talk about sisterhood and family and Lian's wildly successful podcast SATELLITE SISTERS. Lots of laughs and heartwarming monents abound as the ladies share tales of reinvention and how the bonds of freindship and sisterhood inform their work.

Welcome to friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Christen Hermel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hello, it is Wednesday night and that means it is time for friends and fiction and we are back after a two week hiatus. Boy Do we miss all of you. We are so glad to be here with you tonight. I'm Christin Harmel, I'm Patty Callahan Henry, but our Maryka Andrews, and this is friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories, to support independent bookstores, authors and Librarians. Christie is on a rare vacation tonight with her family after several grueling weeks of book tour, but she'll be back next week and she sends her love. I know she's sad that she can't be with US tonight, but tonight we will be talking with our old friend author, the and Dolan, who's lost and found in Paris, is just out this month. Of course, you also know lean from the very successful satellite sisters podcast she runs with her sisters Julie and Liz. You might remember that we celebrated Mother's Day with the three of them just last year. So we are excited to chat with Leon again in just a few minutes. But because we've been gone for two weeks now, we have quite a lot to catch you up on right and do not forget that. You know, we continue to encourage you to support Indie book stores when and where you can, and one way to do that is to visit our own friends and fiction bookshop, Borg Page, where you can find lean's books and books by the four of us and all of our guests at a discount. And we also want to remind you that Christie's newest the wedding bail, is available in bookstores right now and Mary Kay's the Home Wrecker, is out on May third. Of course, they're both available wherever books are sold, but if you want a hand sign first edition of both books us a little gift. You can order the friends and fictions springbox from our friends at independent book store Oxford Exchange. You'll receive a beautiful and when I say beautiful, they do such an incredible job, to delivery of both books, each of them signed, and since Christie's is already out, you'll get it just as soon as they ship it. You know what I've got to say? I just saw Christy the earlier this week in Vero Beach, was onever tour stops. It was just so awesome to see a all the friends and fiction people there. But be the way people have embraced her book so much. I mean it's such a great book. If you haven't picked it up yet, I hope you will. And of course, if you get that Oxford exchange box it also comes with the home workers, which is also a book people are so excited about. And I said do we? Oh my gosh, I this going to be such a huge hit. So we're so excited for that. Well, as you if it will, no, see you, no need for fingers crossed, Kay. We know it's going to be amazing. Well, we have been hard at work since we last saw you. So of course, Christi and Patti have launched their books and Mary Kay and I are gearing up for our book tours and less than two weeks. But we also put together something new and really special that we're excited to tell you about. See, you give us two weeks of free time and we don't even know the meaning of that. So we fill it with new friends and fiction endeavors exactly. Don't get us time off, we're just going to come up with more stuff. So I don't think any of us know the meaning of the word vacation.

I mean, Christy is technically on vacation today, but we've already we've been texting all day with her, so I don't think we've we've given her a chance yet. But guess who benefits from our tendencies? You out there? We are so thrilled to announce this brand new thing we have going on. It's a brand new partnership. It's the first time we've talked about it. You are the first to know, and it is a partnership with a cool new social platform called fable. It is a book club APP for Social Reading. That's right, fable is a social reading APP for online book clubs. It's a free APP for your phone or tablet with loads of incredible book clubs to join. Their mission is to deliver the world's best social experience with exceptional stories for everyone. We have joined forces with fable to start a brand new premium club, because we're nothing if not and we are calling it the friends and fiction behind the book. It's a totally interactive book club. It's not just a book club where you read it and then answer some discussion questions and it's an interactive book club led by us. That's right. You will get a different book every month and we want you to join now for the full immersive experience. Yeah, absolutely, and you don't have to buy the book or anything. There's lots of different ways to read. You can check out the book from the library, you can read it wherever you've bought it, or you can buy it straight through the APP. But it's just kind of a really it's just interactive and amazing. So as you read with us UN fable, you'll discover the story behind every feature book, plus fascinating insider talk with the authors. Fables unique social reading features will let you share your reactions thoughts and favorite quotes with us and with fellow readers, and you'll gain access to special resources you can't find anywhere else. And our first pick is the wedding veil, the brand new best selling novel by Christie Woods and Harvey. Let's read Christie's lay this together to discover deleted scenes, the inspiration behind her unforgettable characters, numerology, secrets hidden in the pages, historical fiction research tips and much, much more. Yeah, see, you can visit fable dot cos that's notcom dot com. FABLECO backslash friends and fiction to sign up today. And just as a heads up, we want to make clear that this is different from the friends official friends and fiction official book club led by Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardner, who we ad we absolutely adore. You know, more than Elevenzero of you are members of that club, but this is a completely different format. They're very different things, different names, different experiences. It's more like a read along at your own pace, where you kind of get to read along with other people on the page, and it has lots of special add on features, insights, you know, and all of this lives within this really unique APP whereas, of course, what Lisa and Brenda do is have the guests on each month, the featured book author on each month, to do a really deep dive into that book where you can talk with the author. So they're just just different experiences, but we do feel like this is cool and cutting edge and we hope you'll give it a shot along with us because, you know, maybe it's just the future of reading. That's what we get so excited when we heard about the opportunity to do this and we just hope you're alone for the ride with us. Now the cost to join our premium club on table is just five dollars a month, or you can purchase an annual premium all access premium men for ship for just seventy dollars, and that's for the entire year to join our club, as well as any of the other clubs on fable, because they have other book clubs, including Lavar Burton's book. Cool is that? So we hope lots...

...of you will subscribe read know, we don't think. We know. It is going to be a ton of fun and it's an additional way to interact with the four of us. As an extra added incentive for you to join, we have an amazing giveaway running for the next week. Sign up for friends and fiction behind the book on fable by midnight on Tuesday April Twenty six, and you could be chosen at random to win this. The pictures about to show entire adorable book part stocked with books, already downloaded the APP. So this just have to imagine the book the yeah, it's there. I was like, wait, what happened to it? So it is a it is this adorable green book thing and it's full of books that you can win. Yes, it's loaded down. So visit Babel dot co back friends and fiction to sign up today and automatically be entered to win. Will Announce the winner on April twenty seven live show with our guests Jane Green. Now can you handle even more excitement? I kind I can't. Again. YEA, this is a second anniversary of our very first show, which will be celebrating next week because we want to wait until Christie's back. Yeah, but what better anniversary gift to US and realizing that we get to go on the road to see Oh of you. We are so excited. So not only to be have an amazing spring summer schedule coming up, on the show with guests including Harlan Coben, Adriana Trigiani, Ellen Hildebrand, Jason Mott, emily given, Laura Dave Ta Williams, Jennifer Weiner. But the four of us, I know few, but the four of us are hitting the road for three, three friends and fiction live events this summer. So the first will be on May fourth, which is two weeks from today, in Cleveland, home of our dear friend Ron Block, who will be hosting us for a big theater events with the Cuyahoga County Library System. And then after Cleveland we are headed to the Jersey shore two weeks later, on Friday may twenty, for another amazing event at the theater. We're going to be at the theater, this time with the Independent Bookstore Book Town and Manasquand, New Jersey. And the third one on tap a luncheon event on July twenty one and Rohoba Beach, Delaware. And we will start sharing all of that ticketing information soon and we really, really hope that you can join us on the road. When we first started this two years ago, it was because we couldn't you, we couldn't hit the road, and now we get to hit the road together and all of us who have come together over it hast two years in this virtual space, we can. We can meet up in real life. So we're excited to meet you, but it's also, I think it's so much fun to watch you meet each other and connect in person after connecting online too. So we're excited about that at Shawn, I think you have the picture of that, of that cart, so we don't have to imagine it anymore. Let's see, there we go. Cool is that it's like a friends and fiction like Pale green color and just absolutely loaded with books. So that is the cart that one lucky winner will roll away with for signing up for our friends and fiction, the new book club that we have on fable. So that's the friends and fiction behind the Book Book Club at fablecom. backslash friends and fiction or download the APP and sign up friends and fiction. All right now, we hope that you are already downloading the table APP and planning your road trips to Ohio and New Jersey and Delaware. So while you were doing that, we would love to welcome our guest for the evening of the wonderful Leando Lynn Lean, is the author of three best selling novels, the...

Sweeney Sisters, my favorite, Helena Pasadena and Elizabeth, the first wife. She's also a regular humor columnist for Pasadena Magazine has previously written for TV, radio, magazines and websites. Lean is also to produce her and a host of satellite sisters, which is an award winning talk show she created with her for real sisters, as opposed to her for unreal sisters, which are us, which are us, and the satellites sish was also written the book together called you're the best, a celebration of friendship which is popular with book clubs. Maybe, maybe I just want us to be her fake sisters. Were Cannet to ask her yeah, when she comeside captive audience, when she got I know, what is she going to do? Say No, and then suddenly Sean's live feed just goes on the GLYPH. Okay. Lean, as a talented speaker who combines humor and heart, has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show, CBS Sunday morning and the today show. She has been a speaker feature at the La Times Book Festival, which is where she'll be next weekend. If anybody is out that way. The Santa Barbara Celebrity authors lunch and dozens of other events across the country. Lean lives in Pasadena, California with her husband, two sons and the German shepherd. Her New Book, lost and found in Paris was just released on April fifth. Sean, can you bring Leon on him? I signed up for Your Book Club while You were doing member hurt full of books. Maybe we can rig it so she wins. No, I didn't say that. I have that out loud. If what you said just our secret, you know what, if she let us be her sisters, her honor our sisters, and now we get on this. You are my satellite sisters. That satellite sisters we always intended. You don't have to be blood sisters. It's just the people that you turn to when the best thing in your life happens are the worst or you need to call somebody you know rage about the terrible haircut you just got. Like. Those are your satellite sisters. So yes, of course, you my settle and sister. I love that. Leon. Are you saying one of us has a bad haircut? We're a little know. I wait, I would never say that publicly. Privately maybe, but not not in front of people where among that's tress. I know your real life, to your real life sister, you pull her aside and say what were you thinking? Yeah, I actually we would go to another sister and go, Oh my God. And who's gonna tell her? Yeah, who's gonna tell her? Nobody. Nobody's gonna tell whoever? Nobody. Well, now that we've established that we all have perfect gorgeous hair, lean, can you start us off tonight by telling us a bit about lost and founds in Paris? Oh sure. I'm so happy to be here and I'm so happy this book is out in the world. It took a while for it to be birthed, so it's just a thrill that it's out there. Thank you. I love seeing it. I love the cover. This is an art history treasure hunt, is how I describe it, because there's a mystery that happens, but I'm not a mystery writer, so I thought, well, that's a lot to say. People are expecting a real mystery and it's my book. They might not they they might be suspicious, but the main character is an art curator. She works here at a museum in Pasadena. It's based on a real museum, but it's fictionalized in the book. She happens to be the daughter of two very famous people. Her father was a famous artist and her mother was a supermodel, you know, because it's fiction, so you can do it, mix stuff up, but I wanted to kind of look at fame too as a concept. So so joan is thinks of herself as the average daughter of above average parents. And in her work as a curator sometimes she has to...

...career art from one place to another, from her museum to another museum or from her museum to maybe a buyer, maybe they're de acquisitioning a piece. So she gets she'said. She's in a rough patch, things are going south in her life. So she gets the opportunity to go to Paris with this piece of artwork and she takes it and she goes. She makes some poor decisions night one and long story short, the artwork disappears, and so that starts this kind of treasure hunting journey of self discovery all throughout Paris. Maybe nothing better. It's so good. We all loved it. Thank you. That's a great way to talk about it. I'm still reeling at at Jones husband, who not only has sex with his former assistant but manages to have twins with her. I mean it's bad enough to have to have an affair and then to have a baby, but to have twins, that's that's sacred family, secret family. You know, they happen. And Yeah, there were something about I mean one baby's fine, but twins, yeah, the top. Yeah, I mean that is that is what happens to Joan right at the beginning of the book. Is based on a story, true story of happened to a friend of mine. So letting you it's the job, right, and the after happy, at the afterparty you can tell us all who that was. Okay. Well, yeah, I mean things, things happen. Life is messy. I think the older I get, the more I realized life is very messy and family super complicated and marriages and relationships don't it doesn't all end up. Don't go on a straight are now and you're not just everyone's not sitting on the couch watching British murder mysteries and falling asleep at a thirty like my husband and I. Are there and they're doing things and some of the let's let's talk about the setting in this novel. Although the theme of the secret family kind of is hearkens me back a little bit to the Sweeney Sisters. Hmm Yeah, but we're not gonna go there. We're going to talk about the setting in lost and found in Paris, which everyone, if you haven't already gotten it, should get. You know, in this book we feel so connected, not just to the characters but also to the places that you're writing about and I think for all of us, for a lot of I think all of the writers on this group, setting us so important. That's why I like in my books, including the home wreckers, my new one, it's set in Savannah, a place that has captured a big piece of my own heart. Would you tell us a little bit about your connection to Paris and why this book is sit that set there, and how you manage to bring it so alive on the page? Thank you. You know, Um, I love books with this sense of place. You know. I again, I think that's why your books are so all of your books are so rich. Like I like to go somewhere with my book and I can't. I hate when I watch TV shows. I'm like what you Eric, Midwestern town is this is Dawson crazy. So and I also like fantasy places. I mean, why not go someplace fabulous in your book? You know, this book starts in Pasadina, which is my hometown, but goes to Paris, because who doesn't want to go to Paris? I mean there, I mean they're very few people that don't. Think, if things really went badly in my life, I just want to go to Paris for six months and, you know, wander around and and eat bread and drink wine and look at the met like. That sounds snow, but so I and I had spent a lot some time in Paris in my tent S. I was there as a student a bunch of times and then my first job out of school, I have to have a job that I had to go to Europe a lot for. It was pretty good Gig. So I would make stops in Paris. But when I sat down to write this book, I hadn't actually been there in twenty five years. You know...

...what, kids, happened? I mean we went other places, we just didn't get to Paris. And so I started by just googling the heck out of Paris and, you know, then I started following all the Prussian instagram accounts and all the the bloggers and starting getting newsletters and I was just trying to get back and fused in Paris. I mean I knew what I loved about it, but I didn't know if that would sort of the plot well. And so and you can find everything online. You can go to Google stree few and there you go. You're creating the hotel where they stay in the Atla with it, where action happens, and the restaurants they go to. So I actually wrote a complete first draft of the book and sold it before I actually went back to Paris to sort of check the story. My son was over in Europe doing is his study abroad program in the before times, in two thousand and eighteen, and so we went and we sort of tracked the whole book, which was really fun. Fine, some of which I hadn't spent a lot of time in, like my Martra, where is factors really heavily in the book. I hadn't spent a lot of time there. So I just I had to just sort of fact check myself on this trip and it was great and I could remember, Oh yeah, the smells and Oh in the food and you know, the feel of the cobblestones and the rain and, oh my gosh, I'll gorgeous. The women are, so I you know, you just that all came rushing back to me, but I just think Paris is a magical place. Yes, really managed to put that on the page, which I am being pretty very tricky. I was nervous. I'm glad I did the second trip back, I think, and was a part of court. There was one section of the book where I was you know, there's a lot of art history in it, which is not really an area of expertise for me, and at one point I was like looking up stuff on Google on one day and then like writing it at my book the next day and I realized it was terrible because, oh my gosh, oh yeah, I was like, I sound like an idiot, I sound like for college freshman, like cramming for a paper. Learned this yesterday. I put it in the book. I wish I just cut the whole site. I just I cut pages. I was like, no, one have to rethink how this whole my God, pressure Hume Works and where they go and everything like that, and that I think. I think I did the right thing, but it can be hard to cut as you know, to be hard to cut that many pages, so I just had to let the book be more Prusian and more our history. Yeah, that's awesome, and it seemless like. I mean, I don't I'm surprised to hear you say that, because I certainly don't notice fifty pages of aren't Bas okay, yeah, yeah, no, I'm not. I'm even sitting there thinking, like where would that? Where is that? Yeah, the whole middle of the book. Yeah, I get it. Ask middlechrump. Okay. Yeah, you know lean, if you if for our folks who are getting the friends and fiction news letter, which I hope you are, you might have read today that lean didn't start writing fiction until she was forty five. And you mentioned your first book, Helena Pasadena, and you said by the end of the book she and reinvents herself, and so did I. Would you talk a little bit about how you summon the courage to jump into the unknown and why it's so important for us, especially women, I think, to step out of our comfort zones and take those big leaps sometimes. Sure, I'm so happy to tell this story because that book gets mentioned to me every single week. It you know, particularly I live in passive. It meant a lot to women, but you know, I was unemployed. Basically, I found that unemployment really freed up my time that we have been doing. We have been doing satellite sisters very happily for eight years at ABC and then all of a sudden, you know, Disney sold off the radio division and we had been doing a show six days a week live, three hours a day. Right, so just working six days a week with young kids, I mean writing a couple of magazine calms. I was busy and and then I had nothing to do. So I sat on my cab coach...

...and I watched Sweet Home Alabama like a hundred times, and then I thought it's a good one. I mean it doesn't hold up, Patty, I'm it dofinitely. You know what, I haven't seen it. And well, here so you're proud. Yeah, it's not holding up well, but at the time it was exactly what I needed. But Um, so and then I thought, well, I guess this is it. Like it was the global financial crisis in two thousand and nine. There weren't any other jobs in media. My sisters who had been employed on the radio with me went back to their day jobs, but I could only write and talk. That's all I could do. So I have been gathering, you know, bits and bobbles for a novel for many years. I mean I had been steadily writing magazine columns and business plans and party invitations, like writing a lot of stuff for satellite sisters, but never word of fiction pros ever. And so I signed up in two thousand and nine for an online writing class because I knew a couple things about myself. I knew that I needed public humiliation as a motivator, like I needed to actually say to people writing a novel, you know, as I wasn't going to get anything done. Yeah, and Um, and I needed but very Catholic concept, by the way. Oh Oh, yeah, xpation was that. And then I also needed to pay money and it was in the cheap so I was like I'm gonna do this, and and I it was a ten week class and because my name is Dolan, I was the first one up. They're like, okay, thirty page, just submit it next week, and I was like a deadline. I was a good student, okay, and I just wrote it there. I wrote my first thirty pages and without that class I don't think I ever would have gotten started. I met three or four writers in that class and then we stuck together. And this was in the days before zoom and everything, so we were just google docking. We didn't see people. We would just get in a chat room and chat and I met three other writers and we stuck it out and we I kept submitting pages and at the end of the year I had a book and and I sold it to a publisher, if here in Los Angeles, and it was just a fantastic publishing experience because the publisher had never published fiction, and either I. So we knew nothing about publishing fiction and so we did it all wrong. You know, we brought it out in like November because it was they had a rose parade setting and so we're like, well, that rose braids in January. It was like no women's fiction comes out in May and June. No one told us that. And you know, there I had like one event. I thought, well, that's that, and then the book just caught fire and that stayed on the La Times best seller list for a year. It just and I did like literally like a hundred book clubs that year and Events and it was just a dream. Publishing experience, but I it was I just had to force myself to do it. I mean when you were saying how do women do it, I think there's a joy to not knowing a lot about something like if I knew how hard publishing was or, you know, what the Book Business Really Meant, I might have talked myself out of it. But I had just enough knowledge to start, but not so much that I got caught up and in my own head, and you can almost never recreate that. I mean you've all written more books than I have and it's hard to get that first writing experience back. It's such a special experience, especially when it works. So but yeah, it was forty five. It was in two thousand and ten when that book came out. That's awesome. That's a great story and it goes directly to even what we're about to talk about in this book, because one of the things that I think all of us in our writing like to explore in fiction is the idea that sometimes things need to blow up so in order for us to start again. And you know in my book, of course, surviving suband that there's a ship that literally blows up. But when these moments happen, you have no choice but to reevaluate your life. You're unemployed, you know, you know in the home wreckers...

...she I'm not going to give away, but your book has a few moments like that too. As you mentioned Jones Life Change Forever when her beloved father passed away in September eleven. And then her life is spent spinning out of control when her husband drops that Tsy weed. See little bombshell, and these are outside forces that force your characters to react. But in life and in art I think things have to fall apart. So I want you to talk to us about the importance of moments like that, both on the page and in the real world, and why did these kinds of life taming changing moments feel so compelling to tackle in fiction, and what can they teach us? They're so compelling to tackle in fiction. Let's so in real life, I think, yes, yes, but you know, in fiction, I I don't know whether I was taught this or I read this or I knew this, but you really want to catch your main characters when something has happened in their life and they cannot go back, they can only go forward. Actually, I think that's a screenwriting tripe that I picked up in a screenwriting class. But like there is an exciting incident and like it's over. Whatever, the life they knew is done and they have to move forward, and that is a way to propel your character on their journey in a way that's that's real and that's true. They can't, they can't go backwards to the husband that the doesn't want them or, you know, to the ship that doesn't exist anymore. So the job. Yeah, I mean it's really a fun way to start a book. I as a much harder way to live your life, you know. But I think I certainly have had experiences. I've watched my friends and my sisters go through life altering experiences. We all know people, people on this call, that have gone through life altering experiences and you can't go backwards, you have to go forwards. I think the I think the difference is sometimes it's a quick turnaround and other times it's take spears and sort of that's the story that we're all creating for ourselves. Like how long would actually take to get to the other side, if you ever get to the other side. So but as fiction it's, you know, it's it's what I write books about, as in life it's, you know what I what I kind of steal myself for and prepare myself for and move forward. And and I think in your in your fiction, one of the things when things blow up or you can't turn around, I love that concept. Like you hit it dead I always say you hit a dead end. I want to write a story where you're going along in your life you hit a dead end and you have to turn left or right, like you have no choice to keep going in the direction you were going and you put your characters in there and we're along for the ride. But when you add a piece of art, it's even better. Yeah, I had you know, I got the idea. So Joan is an art courier, and I got that idea because my nephew is married to a woman who's a curator at the Googenheim in New York and I was trying to figure out in the beginning of this book, like how am I going to connect Joan to art? I knew I wanted to get her to Paris. I knew her father was an artist. The original title of this book was Joan of Art, as a matter of fact. So yeah, you know what, I have to like figure out the pieces of the character so she can get there other than like girls weekend in Paris. You know, that didn't seem that compelling. And I was talking to my niece about her job she had just started at the Googenheim, and she was like yeah, I do this courier thing where I have to take take paintings. I take, you know, them for the Duganheim in New York to the UGANHEIM and Dennis or Bill Bau or or Vegas, and it sounds super glamorous but it's not. It's like a lot of time warehouses and I have to stay with the painting and it's and my head exploded. I was like, oh my Gosh, how has there not been a book written about an art career like that's just such a fantastic career for a character on a book like this. So you know, immediately I came home and I did my research. Know, I googled art career and a whole...

...bunch of things came up and one was this fantastic series of stories from the New York Post. So you know they're going to be good, right, very good. Is Your territory. Journalism at his finest, about this artist in New York where in art career I just been taking a painting from a buyer to a sell it. Their private art careers too. And he had the painting and then he ran into his exboyfriend and so we sat for lunch and then they got drunk and he had an argument and he got in a cab and he left the painting in the cab and the cars and the paint spot he never saw. My Gosh. Okay. So I was like, Oh, this is good. So then I click on the next story. It's even better because he set the whole thing up. It was all a height all along. Boyfriend who's in on it, the cab driver is in it. Took The New York police five years to unravel this duplicity and that's when I realized I could do something like that, like I thought I was going to be complicated to do an organized like, you know, mission impossible, and lasers, people coming out of the museum ceilings, like people getting drunk getting in a cab. I can write that. So so that's how I even came up with that. Little Bits, just a conversation with my niece and then a little bit of a little bit of googling. Okay, Oh my I'm stuck on the Cab O. God my God, has not had a couple of cocktails and gotten in a cab for nothing in the backseat? Just not wear. Your mom left his cello in the camp a couple of years he let us know. It can't okay, all right, let's talk lean about satellite sisters, another very important part of your life. Yes, we know that satellite sisters began as life as a weekly radio show twenty years ago. Then move to ABC radio, where it was live three hour a day, six weeks, six days a week, for five years. Then, you said, you know, you became one of the first podcast geared specifically toward women. You and your sisters have been trailblazers in so many ways. For those of us out there who haven't listened to your podcast yet, could you tell us a little bit about it? Sure, yeah, I mean, we describe the show as the sound of friendships, and we always have. It's the idea, creatively, is imagine spending an hour with your friends over a cup of coffee or a glass of wine. What are the things you talk about? You'd start with say, how's your week? You know what's been happening your life? Did you see these couple of news stories, like hey, did anyone read this great book? And then end with what are you doing next week? I mean that's sort of literally the layout of our show in terms of how we break it down, but it's, you know, what would be an hour of conversation that you would have with your friends, friends that you love but you don't always agree with. Friends that you love but you have different opinion on friends you love but you have different jobs, you have different marital statuses. Some have kids, I don't have kids. So, you know, we wanted to bring broad life experiences to a place that was friendly and not confrontational. I mean when we started the show was to you know, just before two thousand and you know, Talk Radio was just people screaming at each other and just just ment screaming at each other and we're like there has to be something other than this, and my sister lives was like we should do it, we should start a radio show where it's just us talking to each other, like our weekly phone calls, and you know, that was really the simple creative idea that started it and it's it's the reason we're still going, because it wasn't so complicated that we couldn't keep it up. It allowed for people to have their own lives and have their own opinions. We didn't all have to march in line and agree with one another. Disagree with one another. We didn't. We don't have fake fights on satelescenstring, real ones, but not no drinks aroundo faces. You know, we're just we all know that. Like, at the end of the day, we have to have Thanksgiving dinner together, you know. So that keeps us in check. But but that was the basic...

...creative idea and we particularly wanted to take a look at the parts of women's lives that that don't make headline news, you know, the Daytoday, decisions we make every day about our families and our parents, health and our children and our careers that that don't fit neatly into a category that might be covered on Good Morning America. You know, these are just real people having conversations. So that's that's what it's about and that's what it stayed over twenty years. I love that. You know, on your website you say you've interviewed everyone from nor fron to madeline all right, to big bird. So Oh, gone now, all gone now, which is all had left us. But I want you to tell us about one or two of your favorite distast just that's three girls. Okay, one or two of your favorite interviews and why they meant so much to you. I think it's fascinating. Well, I'm going to say right off the bat nor fron, because you know, I bet you know, just she's in. She's in the materials for a reason. Like, first of all, she was so lovely and Gracious. We were just like five girls from Connecticut doing the radio show and we had figured it out and we just couldn't believe she knew who we were and that she listened to us and that she loved her sisters and she was interested in what we were doing. She could not have been more gracious and supportive, both on the air and off the air, and the little put we call Claus her careers to something I really admire because she's moved across so many genres and she started one place and then, you know, it was hard to be a director and writer in Hollywood when she was blazing a trail, and and she did so with such grace and humor. So absolutely like nor fron would be one of my favorites. I mean, I tended to love the writers because I had again, I hadn't written any pros yet, so I was like I was honing my craft during these interviews, trying to get, you know, information. I loved Nick Hornby when we had him on the show, and funny, charming writer and he just could not have been more delightful. Frank McCourt was on the show, who another long way to loss. Yeah, I know, and he came into the studio and because he had been a teacher and my sister, Sheila's on the show at the time was a teacher, she did a real teacher thing and she wrote a big sign that said welcome Mr McCourt into the yeah, snacks for him and everything. He was like, okay, this is strange awesome, but he was just charming. So I have to say was I loved all the writers we we had a chance to talk to Jj Abrahams, who was working on alias at the time, the writer of that, the TV writer, and now he's gone on to do eight million things, but I admired his work back then and so I just love talking to the writers on the show. For sure tough, and I have to say Malone all right, because, you know, just a huge first and important milestone for women, such a breakthrough. She was such a hero for working moms. You know who is going to just left her. She didn't know what other crew was going to be. She was raising these daughters and you know the next thing. And as she is a secretary of state. So huge admire first, but just amazing to get to talk to the people that are your heroes really. Yeah, absolutely, I would an amazing journey. You've gotten too beyond that's awesome. It's true. Well, I had wit. I've I love my work. I love my work. So do we. I feel like we do. You like? Yeah, I know, I know. It's a gift. It's a gift to get to talk to people and, you know, kind of dig beneath the surface a little bit and pick their brains and I don't know what. I feel like we always came out better people for it. I agree. You learn something with every conversation. Yeah, absolutely do. You're totally right. You know, lean, as we mentioned earlier in the show, this month marks the two year anniversary of our very first live show and April fifteen, two thousand and twenty, and like satellite sisters, in a lot of ways our show celebrates friendships and the things that bring us together. So you and your sisters actually wrote a book called you're the best, a celebration of friendship, which came out in two thousand and fifteen. So...

...it feels fitting to ask you this question. Can you talk to us a bit about the importance of having solid friends and family in your life and about the importance of finding community, like your listeners find on satellite sisters and like we hope our members find here in the friends and fiction community? Well, I mean, I don't know where I'd be without my plans. I don't. I mean every day I'm grateful for them, and I think that's true the more the older you get and the more you go through, the more you appreciate to people that have been around you for years. So we wrote that book. Actually it was really a direct response to losing both our parents in a very short period of time. The book came out in two thousand and fifteen and we had lost our parents in two thousand and twelve and two thousand and thirteen, and we just all had this sense that we had to say thank you to our friends for getting us through that period and we remember we all have our own friends, like we all live in different places and we all have our own friends and in different ways those people had shown up time and time again in the later years of my parents lives, but really all throughout our lives. So it was just really like a thank you note to our friends for getting us up and getting US going and getting us us through. That is just super valuable. You can't put a price on that. And you know, we we talked a lot about the sense of connection on satellite sisters, that we have all these other senses, the sense of adventure and the sense of self, but it's a sense of connection that really gives memings to our lives. That being someone's friend, being someone's sister, being someone's you know, meet and knees, being someone's aunt. Those are invaluable, those relationships and you know that that is really what makes it all matter. So, I mean you go to tremendous community. So you're feeling that now when you can reach out and connect other people, it's really extraordinary. Yeah, I mean when we started satellite sisters there was no Internet. I mean there wasn't we just had a you know, we got etnail and then, like when social media like our whole plan all along was to create a community of women, but we thought the woods I could do it and the show and then it did in ways. But then when social media showed up, we're like, there is a huge value to this and a way to create a community beyond what we what we ever dreamed of. And I'm sure you see that with your people now. We see with our people, would listeners all over the globe. They've connected on their own. They've created satellite sister groups. It's an extraordinary legacy that we did not anticipate when the sport of the show. It was a theory, but it was. It didn't seem well and and so and they they sort of go forth and share similar values. It's a nice place on the internet or a little corner of the world. Satellite System says. Now's your places feel to seem? Yeah, we, we, I think we all feel so, so just grateful that it's turned out that way. You know, I mean if you're anything like us, and I know you are, you put so much time and effort in heart into trying to grow this community, and it's too also model that. By the show you have, I mean the show you have models that and the relationships you have. We teach other is a model to your community. If you were yelling and screaming all the stuff that is not on the way, you wouldn't have a nice facebook group. But that's good, you know, and that's really what you know. You're not like trash talking. Other women are that, and so that doesn't happen over good points. Well, speaking of our Nice community, we're just going to pull two live questions for you because we love having our our viewers ask you questions. Mary Kay, would you like to ask one first? Yeah, there are a ton of questions for really, and maybe you want to come back and answer them on the page. Catherine a day says, what writing course did you take and would you recommend it now? I took a class through a group that no longer exists, so that my writing teacher, her name is Erica Mailman, and you can google her, Erica mail man, and she she...

...still teaches writing, but so it worked for it worked for me. I would say, Oh, there are so many good writers out there and they are adjuncts at community colleges and they have started their own writing classes. There are a lot of great writers out there teaching online. So you know, find one that works for you. Some people may much prefer to be in person and to meet the people in person. You know, maybe maybe you want to go. Los Angeles has the UCLA writers extension. Great classes. I'm sure many other cities do. So find one that is going to work for your schedule. The one I actually took no longer exists. Okay, but worth it, worth it. I took classes when I first started to write to and I don't think those classes exist anymore either. Yeah, but yeah, there's that was a long time ago. A lot of people are just on here saying how much they love satellite sisters. How you know how much they love you, how funny you are, how engaging you are. But Harry Soderman wants to know if you actually collect art or if that's just for the Oh yeah, I mean we have our on our walls. It's not fancy art, like we collect art that we like, we did when my husband and I were first married. We're like we're going to buy a piece of art every year. We bought like one decent piece of our first anniversary and then we had kids and we started by yeah, that was the end. Yeah, our collection for twenty years. But you know, real we go we get a little something. I mean those piers in the back just we took a trip to Austin and I went into a gallery and those are from a local Austin artist. They're just litographs but you know, once you frame them it looks they looks great. So and then we do have my husband's great uncle was an artist, was a watercolor painter and illustrator both World War One and World War Two. So we have a lot of his work because he did a lot of war posters, some of which are quite famous and in the Smithsonian and things like that. So we have anything. We have collected his work as well. Sort of bought things at various auction houses just to sort of reassemble his collection and that kind of started it. But the key is framing because really, I mean there's other stuff in the back is just my kids arn't work from second great, but I think it's great. Well, lean, one of our favorite parts of the show always is to ask for a writing tip because you know it, we just be learned so much all of us, the community out there, the three of us, to four of us, when because he's with us. So do you by any chance heavy writing tip you can share with US tonight? Sure you know, I've been teaching a couple of writing workshops lately and I get a lot of moms at the group and you know, they wonder how can I make the time to write? I use writing sprints all the time. I don't know if you guys to writing sprints where you just we do. We did work that way. Yeah, that's the timer and you hit it and it doesn't matter if it's fifteen minutes or a half an hour or an hour. You don't second guess yourself. You just put as many words on the page as you can. And I you know, I suggested these MOMS just try to get in the like, even if it's fifteen minutes. Just do it. Just spend fifteen minutes. You'll be surprised how much that adds up. So if you're a beginner writer or just struggling to finish stuff, the writing sprint and that means the phone goes off like the TV's off, you're in a quiet room, you have a clock and you hit it and you go. I use them all the time to just sort of push through really hard sections of the book and gets into words on the page. Love it and love that. And you know we usually ask authors to give us a book suggestion and we'd love to know what you're reading. But there's a question in New York Times Book Review Asks Authors that we also love, and that is what book might might we be surprised to find in your library or on your nightstand. But you're currently reading. So you know, and it's...

...me, you're not going to be surprised, but it's not a book. But I am just one woman trying to save the magazine business. So I mean it's now I'm ten decades into this one woman and now there are so few magazines actually publishing. I get them all because all my others conscriptions. So I now get people magazine like I never gotten people before in my life and every week I'm like there's so much good stuff and people magazine. I should have been leaving this for a long time. I get people magazine and I got southern living, which I don't I've never subscribed to sothern living. It's fine, but none of the plants work out here, so or the food, but so. But I get any magazine that's publishing, I get a copy of it. So that's you know, that's just the fun stuff. On My nightstand is a lot of random magazines because I've tried to save the magazine business. So I'm doing the same thing with newspapers. I have to. I have digital subscriptions to four different newspaper. Yeah, that's that's understandable. Good work. Yeah, both of you saving the world. I guess, Christiane, you're out what we're doing. I also have four online newspaper subscription yes, and I also have you sue, receiving people, I think as a substitute for entertainment weekly, when it's sees every day. It's just I yeah, which is terrible because I used to write for people. How awful is that that I wasn't very receiving. It's really this. I just saw today that this month is Martha Stewart living was last print addition. That's so. So why are you never going away? You know, I know, I mean health magazine went out of business like minutes ago. I know, and I think, yeah, Gosh, that I just I love that feel of a magazine in my hands, those beautiful layouts and summing you. They're seeing them. You know, I have a whole all collacive, a Maga Museum, Magazine Museum in my house with or maze and the bonappetites. And you know, oh my gosh, Lena gonna show up at your door one of these days. That's it's right, up right. Well, really, it's well, you two bonappetite. I got my girl well before pinner is pinterest rolled around. I used to save all my like Veranda, all my decorating magazines. I used to save them all in these boxes like spine out, because you would save like ideas and pictures, the right magazines and these boxes. And when we moved to eleven years ago, I was like, oh now there's interest, so through them away. You could have brought him to lean. I couldn't mail them to you, but I wasn't going to put them in the like ten years of the Randa than a moving try. Also, you didn't know her then, so that we okay. That would have been weird to mail her random bad showing up from someone. Yeah, that would be strange. All right, lean, if you would not if you would not mind, sticking around for a few more minutes. We have another question for you, but first a few reminders from us. Well, we hope you guys missed us as much as we missed you during our two week break, and also during that time surviving Savannah came out in paperback. We ran a video on April sixth, the week it came out, with all four of us, plus Megan Ron, at the ships of the Sea Museum and Savannah, talking about the book and showing you some of the incredible artifacts from the real life ship at the center of Surviving Savannah. But since we were off that week, we didn't get to celebrate the paperback launch lie with all of you. So let's take a moment now to give patty a little round of applause. Tablet Ready. Yeah, you can find the paperback of Surviving Savannah wherever books are sold, and you canally tell that I was so singers. Yes, you guys came on the same dat that's right, April fifth. Yeah, the rest of the world. So you can't see, but I'm curtsying. Thank good. All right. Have y all brought your coffee from Charleston Coffee roasters yet? I have. I had...

...some this one, and everyone in the friends and fiction community gets twenty percent off all bagged coffee on their website with the code coffee with friends, all lowercase, all one word. And also be sure to enter this unbelievable giveaway because we are picking three winners, one each and March, April and went may to win a three month coffee of the month subscription. In so for three months you get the coffee of the month. It's a ninety dollar value and you can get in it to win it by using the entry of forum on our Social Media and in our newsletter. So, yell, Good Luck. And now just a quick reminder of our writers block podcast will always drop links under announcements each time a new one drops, a new episode drops. I love that word. We're so good at it, I know. I just feel so HIPP and with it when I say that and I'm like, when you say Halla, I like when you say that. Yeah, yeah, I am silently flipping you a bird off. I don't think that was very silent, to be honest. Okay, was just scratching my head. So drops each Friday. On the last episode, Ron Talk to Andrew need men about the woman beyond the attic. You know that addict, the one and VC Andrews flowers in the attic. And this week Brom will talk to Rachel Baron Baum about her hit Atomic Anna, and Bonnie garmos with her novel lessons in Chemistry, about women, science and fiction and, you know, lessons in Camp Chemistry. Did it hit the book the list this week? Yes, we for the first time. So, yeah, we are so with it. Yep, we're so we're so on top of it. I don't we don't even know the word. We're so much the thing when you're like cutout, cutting edge. We're so cutting Ed that that thing, that word, that word, when you're ahead of the proud that one grand waters were transported. We're trend makers, to be honest, really creepacemakers. Miss the MEG says we're literary tastemakers. Literary tastes good. He said it. I'm like literary policemaker. You keep the heart beating in the literary world. That's us. Oh my gosh. Okay, we have an incredible spring and summer schedule coming up with writers block and it's posted on our facebook page. So go check it out and see all the amazing people we have coming up. We're so excited. So we know many of you have been participating in our very first friends and fiction reading challenge. This month we're encouraging you to read a book featuring a fictional account of a historical event. And if you're looking for a way to keep track of these books and your other reading, we would love to recommend this beautiful reading journal designed by US in conjunction with independent Bookstore Oxford Exchange. As you can see, it as a gorgeous friends and fiction blue linen cover, and inside you'll find plenty of space to record your thoughts on what you're reading. We love seeing your posts on the page about how you're participating in the reading challenge and, as usual, to remind you if you are not hanging out with us. Over on the friends and Fiction Official Book Club, which is another facebook page and it is run by our friends Lisa Harrison and bread and the Gardner. They are now more than elevenzero strong and we are over there hanging out and on May sex there's a hopp hoppy happy happy hour, a happy hour with Ron, and I will get to visit to so that's on a six. Over on the other facebook page and my Gosh, you guys so what? You're just taking over now you're just the AB essentially look age, really in love, weary pacemakers.

That's true. Pacemakers were pacemakers. And there's more, so much more. Make sure you get your Guinzu steamer if you're joining us on our next episode of friends and fiction next Wednesday night, right here at seven PM, we're going to welcome Jane Green with her new books. Sister started us, and Kimberly Brock will stop by for the after show to talk about the lost book of Eleanor Dare. And if you were ever wondering about our schedule, and I know it keeps you awake at night, but you know the schedule is fabulous and it's always on our friends and fiction website and on their head Er graphic on our facebook page. All right, Lee, and we are just turning our attention to you. To wake up, come out. We are the pacemaker. We are the pacemaker to get you awake. There you go to Oh God, I'm gonna throw up, seawn, don't do that. Okay, I think we've asked you before about the values around reading and writing in your childhood. So we're going to kind of switch it up a little bit. I want you to talk to us about what you learned with all those sisters and Childhood and friendships. What have you learned that's found your way into your books? You Reminder, I also have three brothers, so there are eighty fat kids in our family and I'm any youngest kids. Yeah, I'm the youngest today. So mainly I learned to like stay low and brace for impact. You know, I mean that was basically the biggest life lesson I have. Um, but you know, where there were not many people around your dinner table, you just really have to work on your material, like you get no one cares. No one cared about me, like no one cared what I did all day. They didn't. I was like eight, they were teenagers. You think they cared about my math test? So I used to have to actually like work on my material before the dinner tables. I would, oh my gosh, I love this, I would practice stories in the bathroom, like shape up, like okay, the classroom, Gerbils, I got it. I got some material on that and and that has sarved me really well. I mean I still work on my material. I talk to myself constantly and are you know, when I'm walking the dog, I'm just a steady stream of me talking to me about me. So I'm just working on my material, but dog doesn't. The dog doesn't even get to get a word in it. She's very patient. She's very patient. So but I think, you know, I think that was it. Like we we had sort of a competitive lively in her table and you had to bring it and, you know, a tight story. If it was funny, even better. You know, no no sidetracking, just boom, beginning, middle, ed. I think that's helped me tremendously. Let me truly oh my gosh, that's so great. Yeah, I love that. All right, lean, before we let you go, would you tell everyone where to find you, where to find your new book and where to find all things Lee and Dolan? Sure, I mean Lean Dolan. Was Lean is a hard named to spell, but it's right there. It's under so you have a lean dolandcom or satellite SISTERSCOM. Satellite people have a hard time with its one t too else. But so leandolandcom or satellite SISTERSCOM and the book can be found an anywhere and everywhere. So I love that. You have the book shop Dotorg page. That's great. I Love Bookshop Dot Org. So, but lost and found in Paris is anywhere now. That's awesome. The Lian, thank you so much for training us such a joy. You're always so much fun. This was really a pleasure. I just I don't know if you know it well. First of I don't usually drink glass wine at four o'clock on a Wednesday, but look at the Eiffel Tower. Awesome, how appropriate. So I'm just drinking wine out of the Eiffel Tower for you guys. I don't know how I drink this time of day. Here we go. Peer pressure can be a big thing. Tears an Oh, it's thank you so much for coming. And, as make pointed out, where literary defibrillators so and it is to literary pacemakers. So it's going to have some thing to do with that, I don't know. So cheers...

...to that. We have one come out of her nose, I think. And thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks, everybody. Thank you. By my friends. Now to all of you out there. You know, we talked about doing an after show, but Christie's not here tonight. I know we're going to want to celebrate next week with her. Well, you know, for our too month, two year, two months when I saying two year anniversary. So tonight we're going to let you go, but what a beautiful night we had tonight with lean. Don't forget, you can find all of our back episodes on Youtube. We are live there every week, just like we are on facebook, and if you subscribe you won't miss the thing. Plus she'll have access to special short clips. So be sure to come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome Jane Green and Kimberly Brack. Good night, everybody, and I don't way good night. Thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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