Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 2 months ago

Friends & Ficiton with Greer Henricks, Sarah Pekkanen, Ali Brady, Mary Alice Monroe & Angela May

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Four talk with THREE author pairs to learn all about what it takes to write as a team. Meet Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen, co-authors of THE GOLDEN COUPLE; Ali Brady, the oen name for Alison Hammer & Bradiegh Godfrey who co-wrote their debut nobel THE BEACH TRAP; and Mary Alice Monroe & Angela May the writing team behind the middle grade series whose latest installment SEARCH FOR TREASURE is about to be released. All three pairs talk about their unique process for writing together, what they learn from one another, what makes them tick, and they tell us al about their latest releases.

Welcome to friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Kristin Harmel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi everybody. It is Wednesday night and that means we are right here with you for friends and fiction. We have an amazing evening ahead of us, so let's get started. I'm Christin Harmel, I'm Christy winds and Hervey and I'm Grady Callahan memry, and this is friends in fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories, to support indie bookstores, authors and Librarians. Unfortunately, our fourth Maerica Andrews, is not with US tonight because, despite being vaxed and boosted, she has a mild case of covid she'll be okay, but just reminder to stay safe out there. It seems to be spreading like wildfire again. I know you'll all join us in wishing Mary Kay Espedi of every absolutely and she may even be tuning in tonight because we have a jam piped episode and I know she hated to miss it. So over the next hour we're going to be talking with three phenomenal writing teams, all of whom have had such different backgrounds and are and are very different places in their careers. First up we'll have grew hendricks and Sarah Peckinan. Then we'll be chatting with Alison Hammer and Brady. God for you who write together, is a lie brady. And then finally, well, welcome back someone you might be familiar with, Mary Alice Monroe and her writing partner Angela May. But first, even though Mary Kay isn't with us, she's always with us. But even though she's not on the screen, we want to raise a glass to her because, y'all, she just hit her fifth week on the New York Times best seller list with the home wreckers. This is such a huge deal and it means that you all have kept supporting her so on her behalf. Huge thanks to all of you. And speaking of the home wreckers, just a quick reminder to join us over on the really cool new social platform fable, which is a book club APP for Social Reading where we have our very own friends and fiction behind the Book Book Club. And this month we're reading the home wreckers together. And if you join it means you have all these exclusive access things like behind in the scene stories, playlists, secrets and so much more, plus discussion prompts and interaction with Mary Ka Herself. You can share your reactions, thoughts and favorite quotes with us and fellow readers as you read, and you can gain access to special resources you will not find anywhere else, even right here. So it's just five dollars a month to join our premium club, or you can purchase an annual premium all access membership for seventy dollars a year to join all of the other premium clubs on fable, including Lavar Burton's Book Club. So visit fable doc. There's no m friends and fiction backslash. Friends and fiction. Spelling out the word and to sign up today. Okay, can you guys hear me? I was having some microphone problems. You hear me? So Great? Okay, okay, fantastic. Yeah, I've just had a crazy night. My power went off. All right, I'm back. All right, how about even more interaction with us when you can actually hear me, because I will be having my problems. Yes, you say. Well, this summer you will have two more chances to meet the friends and fiction for in person, at a ticketed evening event at Bethany beach books in Delaware on Wednesday July twenty and also at a fabulous luncheon on Thursday July twenty one at the Rohobath Beach Country Club in Delaware, hosted by independent bookstore brows about books. You can find out more under the featured tab on our facebook page or by visiting brows about Bookscom or Bethany Beach Bookscom. Both beach towns are just gorgeous, so it's a great excuse for a summer vacation to we do want to remind you to make sure to buy your tickets in advance if you think you can come, because we expect both events to sell out and we really, really really want to get the chance to hang out with you. So we hope we will see you there. I can't wait, and so soon. And don't forget, as you know, if you're a friends of fiction watcher, we continue to encourage you...

...to support your indie booksellers when and where you can and when. Way To do that is to visit our own friends and fiction bookshop dot org page, where you could buy and greer and Sarah's books, Alison and Brady's books and Mary, Alice and Angela's books, plus books by the four of us and our past guests, all at a discount. And it's not only supports independent book stores, but it also helps us keep friends and fiction up and running. So, before we get going with our amazing episode tonight about writing teams, Christie had this great idea last week of a starting and ask us anything segment, and you all have so many awesome questions for us and sometimes we get so busy talking about business and our guests that we missed talking to each other and Y'all and answering the things you would like to have us to. So leave your questions on the facebook page and we might ask it in the future show. But tonight's question comes from Angie Chenn or real sure that's channery and I think it's a perfect one, because all of the forests don't officially collaborate on books like our writing partners tonight. We're very much a team. So, Angie asked and would love to know. You all talk about your writing sprints, but how much do you guys edit, read or inspire each other's stories? Are you each other's beder readers? So real quick, Christie, that's such a good question. Um. So I think we all have different answers to this question. To orch I think it's really interesting. I have not had any of the ladies vader read for me yet. You're welcome. I have kind of we I think we all have really different processes. I am very much like I write like kind of just a first draft and then it goes straight to my editor like before I've even really liked cleaned it up much so I think they've all written me blurbs like a very early times and actually in the Wedding Vale Patty wrote, was reading like a really early draft for a blurb and she caught this like timeline issue that I was like, oh my gosh, stop the process. It's so funny because you think, like how many people have read this book and how many times have I read it? Like at least fifty and you know, I've never got it. So but I think more than that, like we're just such a good support system for each other. I mean, I know the ladies are really good support system for me and like there there are just in this job. They're not a lot of people that you can like kind of wine and orvent about something like very specific and anyone really understands what you're saying. And I could say something like very specific and they know exactly what I mean, and that in and of itself is really great. And we ask each other a lot of questions, like little things like what do you think about this, or would you have a character do this or this, or what do you think about this name or this title, or so you know, they've all been very involved in the writing process, but so far I've saved them the torture of being Beta readers. Know, it would not be torture, it would be a pleasure. Come on. But yeah, you know, it's funny. Writing is such a lonely profession. I think by nature it's something you do alone, which which is something that I am so interested to dig in tonight with our guests, because they all do it together and we in a way do it together too. And I will tell you. I think it's very interesting that even when we're not involved in the very beginning stages of each other's books, I mean we talk about things, but we don't necessarily talk about specifics or character names or, you know, minor plot points at the beginning. I think as we have grown closer as people, we have found overlap in the books that we're writing, but they overlap in places with it we haven't talked about. So it's just like a mind meld that's happening or something I don't know so well. So yes, we are doing some of that cold like actual, purposeful liberating in terms of asking each other questions. And you know it, Patty was you were patty, you were one of the first readers of my two thousand and twenty three book. You know, because you and I are writing in then. I love it so much. Let me say this. I feel the same about yours. But there were several points of overlap, overlap even in our books, like not at all really the same, but enough points in common that like we were riding the same with creative weight, but the same. Yep, I'm you know, and I think and the notal points were like the book shop or you know, things like that. But you know, Angie, you're asking if we edit or read and and it's not as much about editing and reading, even though we have done some Beta reading and Mary Kay remember, had she had us read her prolog to the home wreckers this year because she'd never done a prolog before, so she had us read it and give input into that. But we definitely inspire help when we get stuck. So, Angie, that is a fantastic question. So now let's welcome our first guests for the...

...evening. Griri and Rix and Sarah Peckinen are the Number One New York Times best selling co authors of the wife. Between us and anonymous girl, you are not alone, and the golden couple, which was just released earlier this year. Before becoming a novelist, greer worked as vice president and senior editor at Simon and Chuster. Her writing has appeared and all three of us right here are publishing with Simon and chuster. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times publishers weekly, a lure and several other publications. Sarah began her career as a journalist covering capital hill. Her debut title, the opposite of me, sold to greer wow, and imprint of Simon and Chuster, which also happens to be the imprint my next book comes out with. So a tree would go on to publish Sarah's subsequent novels, which were sold all around the world to international best sellers. Pair of teamed up to write their best selling novels, which of all Ben Option for film and Television, and if they weren't such wonderful people, I would hate them. So for Sarah and Greer, please, I am for them in trucking this CEO. I want you we're going to dig into writing as a pair, especially since one of you bought the other's book. I just like as an author. I'm thinking, what editor have I ever worked with that I would write a book with? It's fascinating, but I want you to start by telling us about the golden couple, which is your latest so have an idea, Sarah, I want you to tell us what it is about, and then, greer, I want you to tell us what it is really about. Challenge. That's not that's not going to normally do thiss in fiction. All right, so the golden couple is the story of a maverick therapist. She is so outside the box that she has actually had her license revoked and she has a method that really works for her. And basically this is what it is. If you are a perspective client and you walk into her office, ever problem you bring her, it can be a childhood trauma, it can be a infidelity in your marriage, whatever it is, she will evaluate you and quickly decide if she wants to take you on. If she does, she will promise to fix you in ten sessions. But here's a class. You have to do it. Ever, when I read her say that, and because like sessions right, and you've got to ever, she says during those ten sessions. And so the golden couple begins with the golden couple strolling in. You know, they appear to have everything. They're like that couple that we all know on social media where they look beautiful and they never have dog hair on their clothes and they're never running the game. Nothing like me. I don't know a couple. Right. They're very rational and strolling and immediately the wife confesses to an infidelity winds and from America's Very Christy, true creepy fun. It's awesome. That is constant really about. Well, I mean Sarah did an excellent job of our summary. Normally, because you know, we do everything together, right, she normally tells the avery part and then I come in and talk, talk about the Mirth of part. So I mean I think that that that's that's the plot. But what it is is a lot about what you do. What you see on the on the surface isn't is not what it seems with both, you know, with all the characters involved, and I think that, you know, I think what it makes the reader really question is, like we like getting them in on would they sign up for like a ten session method? You know what, you put yourself in that situation. We when we've been promoting the book, we ask audiences all the time. You know, how many of you would sign up to see someone like a very I'm curious, ladies, how many of you would would take that, you know, Opportunity? Oh, I would. I mean I think it was like, I'm in, like you're a right, which times people is a very right. It might be good because you know, you don't have to waste like ten years in therapy. So that's strubency. I feel like I'm like the person that always picks like it's truth and...

...truth or dare, and have to do anything. I say you very much like a big dare. So see, I don't know, I don't know. I feel like I would be like, okay, let's do this bright totally do it too. And yet, just adding on to what per said to I think a lot of it's about appearances and what we project to the world and what is the truth. And I think with the the explosion of social media like that's even more so. Everybody looks like they're having the time of their lives. Everybody's got the perfect kids, the perfect relationship. There the five star dinner. They're keep clinking glasses and a lot of people are feeling more isolated than ever. This thing that's connecting us is making us lonely. It's me, it's feel inadequate, free. You know. There of his feels back the layers and you see this couple that you think has everything and you're going to get to know them. It's intimately, as if you're reading their journals from their nightstands. You're listening it on their fights. So that was really fun for us to explore. is the reality. I Love I wo's in. No, I just gonna say what was interesting about the book too. It's just that the title actually came from our editor at St Martin's and she said, I thought of this amazing title. Nobody's used it before. Here go, we think, you know, I think you can really do something great with it. And so, you know, as Sarah said, with so we thought of this golden couple. And then who, who is going to get to know the golden couple? We couldn't just write a story about a golden couple. Who is the person? Is that a journalist? Is it, you know, a relative? Who is going to get to know them in that really deeply intimate way? And we love writing about therapist. You know, an anonymous girl also featured a therapist, and so it was like, okay, let's let's create a maverick therapist who can get to know them in this conception methodology. Well, agreer, you actually answered the question that I was asking you. So we're having like a psychic mom in here. So I love that idea of you know, your editor like having this input on this story and so I'm so interested, you know, with you being a former editor yourself, what thoughts do you have about this editor author relationship and and kind of that trust level that you have with your editor and to be able to say, okay, like yes, this is a good idea? Well, you know, I did have as an editor for so many years, I got to know many editors in the industry and so when it came time for Sarah and I to you know, I went our book went out. We had a you know, Sara and I both had a list of editors that we had gotten to know over the years and Jen was at the top of that list because I knew I had been, you know, friends with her, I knew how smart she was, what a great she's not just a great editor, but that you can come up with, you know, the title, marketing, publicity. She he's just she's like a triple threat of talent, and so I trusted her from the get go. And I know a lot of people ask what was it like to be edited? I'm, you know, incredibly gratefault of an editor. She's, you know, she and she's a very additive editor. So she doesn't just say this isn't working, she'll give us suggestions about what could work even better. In fact, the naming of the ten sessions. She came up with those names. She's like the ten sessions should have means and she rattled them up with like confession disruption. Yet she and just she's genius. That's incredible. Well, Sarah, since greer required you and edited you in your earlier career, do you think that that's helped your partnership or like, do you know? And she's thinking before she yeah, I mean I think it definitely helped because we established a strong friendship. We didn't just have the author editor relationship, we also had our friendship and I would go to New York and we would go out to a restaurant and talk for three hours, shut down the restaurant. We got kicked out of more than one restaurant. We could say, like we're going to take off our professional hat, we're going to kind our friends hat and like what's really going on right, like, let's spence with all the again the theme of our booth, the superficial, like what what are you struggling with? What are you happy about? What are you excited about? What are you in pain about and we would talk about everything, kids, family's parents, you know, drew beams and so that, I think, was really the basis of starting our writing partnership. Because, you know, when greer came to me and said I want to lease Simon Schuster, I feel like I really want to write and I'm not telling anyboding. I'm telling the husband, I'm telling you, and wanted to other people, but that's it. You know, that was kind of the launching pad for us to write together and without our friendship it wouldn't have happened. That's so cool. I love that. Which one of you...

...was the one? We did one or the other of you say I want to write together. Sarah did. I said to her, as Sarah said, I confess to her because, like she said, we had this deep friendship and I really was not telling people I wanted to write because it's a very I mean, you guys all know it's scary, right was you know, could I do it? What I'd be able to do it? And I said to Sarah I'm thinking, you know, I'm thinking of writing, and I actually bounce some idea around to her and she's like, why don't we write a book? Together. Wasn't that we didn't use the idea that I suggested, but she sort of and she's very instinctive and intuitive as like she's written. She can write by herself. She's done all these amazing books alone. Why does she want to do this? She just said I had an instinct that we can do something really great together, and I called her back twelve hours later. I was like, I'm in. I mean, like you know, as you said in my intro, I edited hundreds of books, I have written a couple of articles, but I've never written a book. I'd no idea. So I was like this going to be a masterclass and learning how to write. Yeah, I mean it was really I mean I feel like we are both reaching out to the other, like we're called me, you know, beating, confided in the secret and then said, I get together some pages. Would you read them? You know, can I don't say ideas off you. I'm like totally, you know. Well, yeah, switch Wolson that way. And then I was like, well, let's get out the middle man. Let's just write together like this is you and do it. Get it was again, like we're said, it was super instanctual. I occasionally have like very gut driven responses. I don't know if you guys are more analytical or more gut driven, but when I have the gut calls me, this is it, I have to go for it and it usually, I'm almost always when it sets strong, steers me write and I'm like, we will have so much fun together, and we have. That is usome, and not just fun but success. I mean you can. I've been so successful with these books, which is fantastic. All right, so you mentioned that at the very start of the book, Marissa, the wife, has been unfaithful to Matthew, her husband, and she feels so guilty about straying that she insists on confessing to her husband during their first therapy session. Sad who. Is it difficult to make Marissa a sympathetic character given that betrayal? No, because I think everybody in the world is complicated, and I thinks are you know completely. You know, black white, all shades of gray like that. Everybody has things that inform their actions, even if their actions aren't sympathetic. Once we understand them and what's driving that, we may not admire what they're doing, like we may not have done ourselves. But when there is understanding, then you connect with the characters, and so we really wanted you to get to know Marius and what drove her to that moment, who I like that well. Knowing her back story and what projects doing is different sense in one just throwing it on the table. Sure, now blowing up the blowing up the room, so to speak. We are I know that you have had a longtime interest in psychology, to the point you said you'd be a therapist you weren't a writer. I say that all the time. I would say that is greaters. We are all pretend psycho analysts, right. We're teasing apart to carry out and motive and backstory. So could you talk about the process of creating avery, the unconventional therapist? Yeah, I mean, and just to echo with Sarah was saying, to just about all of our characters we have to dig in an a. You know, in any of our the you know the villains, the you know the the reader always has to understand where they're coming from. So if you look at any of our characters, we feel a little bit of sympathy for all of them because something traumatic has happened to them, and I guess that is where, you know, the background in psychology or the interest in psychology, because there is also very interested in psychology. We both listen to psycholog to podcast, and subscribe for secutality. Today, Sarah, it's in a psychology experiment once. So we're both both more college here. So we're both really, you know, curious about the human mind, and that is, you know, it for us. Our books often start with the characters and who they are and even if something doesn't make it on the page, like you know that they wake up and you know way themselves every day and they eat seven almonds and you know whatever, whatever that is. You know that's weird specifics. We know those. You know all of those details about our character and what's interesting to when you asked about Marissa being sympathetic, I've heard a lot of people who didn't find a very sympathetic to begin with and that's something we had to really layer into give her more hearts that the reader understood where she was coming from. So for both of our characters we had to really think about what, you know, what what happened to them in their past? What made them? What's driving them?...

Did you interview therapists when you were when you were. Well, my mother was a therapist for many years, and Sarah's sister in law. It's awesome. So we both. Yeah, so we spoke to we spoke to to both of them. But the great freedom with Avery's because she lost her license. It freed usn't you know? It freed us up to make her not a traditional therapist. So it's right that that genius actually yes, I mean, don't know, you're not going to get those emails. Well, they wouldn't actually be able to. Yes, it's he all that happened to know the rules, to break the rules, right, but exactly, that's exactly exactly. Oh, that's fascinating. Well, I feel like the whole this whole segment has really been kind of a writing tip. But selfishly we love getting writing tips from our friends who come on the show. So would you guys find giving us a writing tip? Either one of you sure? I mean, I go ahead. This scary that writing is a foreign language and the translation thought paper something that you have to learn by immersion. So I rather than one specific tip, I could give like a million little chips that we probably all do. But I would say immerse yourself in this new country, in this language when you're cooking podcast about writing. Take the master classes, read novels, deconstruct them with index cards, to take it down, like the architecture, down to the studs and seeing all the novelist put it together. Think about writing like just do as much as you can when you're not actually writing so that the landscape becomes more comfortable for you. Amazing. We've never had that tip before. And a hundred and twenty six episodes. It's sorry, that great. Yeah, that, I thought mine is like. Well, mine is so basic and dumb and you obviously, since you know written so many books, have done this. But for me it's just like getting your butt in the chair and sitting down to write. You know to do that every day and that you can't edit a blank page. So just putting yourself in there and creating that kind of structure. You know, having a writing partner creates that accountability, but for people who don't have that, they have to figure something else out. So whether it's just, you know, telling someone else that they're going to write a thousand words a day or whatever it is, but that you know that. That would be my that's my very basic for the for the novice writer, sit down, you just have to do oh, it's not just basic. Yeah, we have good tell every day. Yeah, right, I mean it's whenever we get lost, it's back to the basics, and the basics are button chair. Yes, it's fundamental. Absolutely. Yeah, oh my gosh, y'all, it's so much fun talking to I have a lot of Um you guys that thank you. Have to come back. We'll have to come back and I love hearing that you guys are all writing the same elements, like you know, you have your own books, but there are similar elements in it because that happens all the time. I so many Mutu and names to Christie. Used a name and then didn't use it because Mary Kay used it. Picked another one and Mary Kay used that one. She's like forget it, but I was like I can't change it again, like this is so weird. The are were a lot of the scale. It's idea, see whatever it is, and we it's crazy. It's that, young man, you know, universal unconscious blow, and we're all tapping into that same river, under the river, and so sometimes come up with some of the same things. So, but y'all are amazing. Thank you for coming and spending. Thank you, thank you, to see you too. See you soon. All right. Next up we are were they great? I just I adored this God yes, Nanny. Now I want to talk. I mean I have like I could ask them a million more questions, but another time. What I know that, honestly, you I first met them. We had an event together in Indianapolis and we get to go to this great dinner together and they're just as warm and lovely in person as you would as you saw them here tonight. I mean, they're just wonderful people. So all right, and I'm so sorry, Cathy. I Mary Kay head to Miss X. I know she likes them quite. She loved them. Some time with them? Yeah, exactly. All right. So next up we are thrilled to welcome Alice and hammer and Brady Godfrey to writers who have teamed up to write under the combined pen name Ali Brady. Now, you all out there have met Alison before. She's the author of you and me and US and little pieces of me, and I have actually known her, I believe, since...

...our college days at the University of Florida, and I'm not going to tell you how long ago that was because it's longer than I would like to believe I'm starder than mine. So your five year reunion is coming up, isn't it exactly? Almost mid twenties? Yeah, right. She's one of the most supportive writers I know and I'm thrilled to see her launching this new branch of her career. So Alice lives in Chicago and works as a VP creative director at an advertising agency. Now, Alison first mentioned Brady to me years ago and I know they've basically become writing the fs since then, and I think they even call each other that on their their websites. STAME love, because we're kind of writing bfs too, and, as we know it, friends and fiction writing bfs are a wonderful thing to have. So Brady is the author of the upcoming psychological thriller impostor. She lives in Utah with her family and in her spare time she works as a position that was a joke about spare time. She clearly doesn't have any, but that's amazing. She works as a position. So the beach trap is their first book together and it is set to hit stores in just a few days, on June fourteen. Sean, can you bring Alison and Bradient. I think it's been like seven years since college, Christen, not five. Oh, seven, right, because we're just about to turn thirty. Yeah, yeah, I don't want to AIDS you guys too much. So, oh my gosh, I wish. I wish. It have been seven years since cris also, we've grown. We've grown, as say, don't I can. Yeah, that is true. That is true. Okay, Alison and Brady, can you ladies, I think we're going to do the same thing we did with greer and Sarah. Alison, can you tell us with the beach trap is about? And then, Brady, we're going to ask you to tell us with the beach trap is really about. It, sir, Elison, you but it starts. I'm so happy you pick me to do the easier progress. I'm as radium like. If they ask this, you take the harder one because she's sugar than I am. The beach trap twist on the parent trap, only in our book, instead of the sisters trying to bring the parents back together, it is the parent trying to bring the sisters back together. So the book opens with Kat and Blake, our sisters. They're there. They meet at Camp and they became they become instant best friends and find out where the end of that summer that they have the same father, so they're half sisters. The discovery does not go well. It's slightly traumatic and so they don't speak to each other for fifteen years until their father passes away and leaves them this Rundown Beach House in Dustin Florida, and both girls have a very different relationship with her father in a very different relationship with the house. They're instantly at odds. Cat, you know, grew up at the house and wanted to want to keep bit. Blake needs money to help support her grandfather, so she wants to sell it. So instantly they're at odds and they spend the summer, you know, repairing their house and their relationship. There's a cute dog, a cute kid and both sisters have a love interest. So there's plenty of steam and swoon. Also steam and swoon. Oh Gosh, that's so great. All right, that was a fantastic description, brady. Can you tell us with the beach trap is really about at its core? Yes, so the story is really about the sisters. It's the two sisters relationship. They they had this really instant connection when they were twelve years old and we tried to capture that magic of summer camp and how you can become best friends with a girl that you hardly know within such a short time and then to have it be totally ruptured when they find out they share dad and one of them is, you know, the dirty little secret. And so they have to repair this and they each have to confront very different, different wounds from their dad. They each knew him as a different person. They're each grieving him in different ways and they have to come to terms with that. There's some blame on either side towards each other, and so as they're fixing up the house, you know, of course, it's sort of symbolic of them fixing up this relationship and coming to terms with each other, learning heavy a family and really confronting their wounds and learning how to move on and move on together. I told you she was smarter than me stock, so I'm that is I was acced Achorus. Alison. Okay, since we're really digging in tonight on author Pairs, we'd love to ask you exactly. I'm dying to know this, how you met and how you decided to collaborate on a book. When we were just talking to Grier and Sarah, I'm thinking how nervaking it would be to the be the first one to say, like asking a girl out, do you want to write together? What they know? Right, like then your friendship is weird because, yeah,...

...so, Brady, do you mind telling us the story? Sure. So we met online in a writing group, the women's Fiction Writers Association, and I think it was in a I mean we just sort of got to know each other. Everybody knows Alison. Alison is incredibly outgoing and Gregarious and kind to every pint of and yes, yes, I mean everybody knows outs and in every group issues in and so, I mean really, I just was like thought that she was sort of like a celebrity in this group. And then we were in a in like it was like a workshop, writing workshop or something. We we had to read each other's pages, you know, and so we kind of ready to stuff. I love her writing, she loved my writing. I can't remember who who reached out first, but one of US said, Hey, do you want to swap pages? We're both queering, trying to find agents at the time, and so can we swap pages and critia and we just loved critiquing and reading each other's work. And you know how important that is to be able to just hive and how you write and how you critique as well, because that's so important, right. And so we just kept doing it. We just kept swapping pages and we became critique partners essentially. So like we formalize it and we were unlike I'm your only one, you're my only one, like no more, show more anyone else. So much like goings were exclusive. where. Yeah, so we kept doing that for a long time and you know, each of us have separate writing past. And then it was the spring of two thousand and twenty when everybody was just locked down, right, we're all just home. I have kids, I was like homeschooling and Alison was working from home and we just we were sharing book ideas. One day. We chat all day long, all day long, and we were just sharing book ideas and she had an idea and I had an idea and and we were like these actually go together really well, and so we started writing this book and that book did not did not end up getting published, but it led us to writing the beach trap, which an editor loved the idea and said please send me a proposal for this, and we did and she bought it. So so in hearing grar and Sara talk was so interesting because we were Brady and I feel like we're intertwined in each other's writings similarly in a different way, not as editor and author, but there's a there's a line and in my second book little pieces of me that reviewers always call out that they love that line and Brady wrote it. So like we are all like, I mean both edit each other's work, so much so I think that it was a natural transition because we are, we were so involved in each other's writing process. So going from critique partners to coauthors, I mean it's really been really seamless. So who's the first person who said let's write booked together? I don't remember it was he. I had an idea, and again we talk all the time, and I said I have this idea. Is it crazy? And Brady said, not only is it not crazy, it fits together with an idea I had. What if we do this together? And I was like, I was very flattered, like I was like, you'd want to write a boot with me. Oh, that's so sweet. That was that. I always under that. You know, there's there has to be a moment where somebody says, let's try this together. Okay, else, although I although Patty, it's funny you say that because I think every time we talked about how friends and fiction got started, we don't have a clear idea of who said what or how it actually got off the ground. Like it just it felt like group think from the first moment, because I fit so well together and like, and I think none of us, and I bet you it's the same with Ali and Alison and Brady, I like. I don't think we think of ideas as well. That was my idea, that was your idea. It was just it was our idea and it worked and like how great. It's what I mean, except what I'm a streaming clear on is that we all wanted to write an anthology and one of us, not present on the screen, did not think that was a good idea. That is true. There's of you who don't know. Is really big with that. No, no, no, yeah, she, yeah, she shuts us down, like Nope, alls. Also, I know, speaking of Mary Kay, I know some of you out there missed the beginning of the show tonights. We had a little bit of facebook trouble in the beginning. If that's the case, and you're wondering where Mary Kate is, she's a minor case of Covid so she's not with us tonight, but she's fine. She'll be back next week. Sorry. Go ahead, SI. We're sending are all good feeling love. All right, Allison, I know you are the founder of every damn day writers, so great a support group for women's writers. So you're no stranger to working with other authors. Can you talk to us a bit about exactly why you started every Damn Day? Yeah, we so, Brady and I and was in this group also. There was a group of us from women's Fiction Writers Association who were all doing Nano Rymo together, which is national novels writers is National Novel Writing Month, which is an international program where writers all around the world right fiftyzero words in the month of November, and a group of us were doing it together. And...

I'm a nerd with all these just different like facebook graphics, and I was doing a daily post. We created a little support group and every day I would post and everyone would check in about their progress and how well they were doing, what their challenges were, and it was a really great support community. And on December first, when it was over, we're like we don't want to stop. And so that group is still in existence. It's about twenty writers and we're all very, very close, and there was a point where we're like, you know, let's make that broader. Let's like this is such a magic the magical thing we've created. Let's invite others. And we wanted to keep our group like, you know, separate, because we've got this great, you know, this really tight friendship. But we're up to, I think, over seven hundred and fifty women writers and every Damn Day writers and we've got seven different moderators and every day we share a post to check in. On Wednesdays we share lines of what we're working on, Monday's we share goals and it's really just, you know, writing. Like Christen, you said, writing can be such a solitary sport, but it's not like there's such a community if you if you get out there, and so really we just wanted to create a community. So not you're just creating a community with the two of you, but you've taken it wider. Yeah, you talk a little bit about how you actually co write a book, like by s your process for doing that. Do Divide the characters, the pages, the chapters. talked us all that. So we plot extensively. You have to plot extensively when you write with someone else. So details, we think for like a hundred page outline right. It was ridiculous. She was like this is the longest repose I've ever read and not it. But and then we in the beach chapters, two main characters that each alternate chapters. So we each took the lead on writing one character. But then so every usually every week, we write one chapter and then we swap it in the next week. We critique each other's and edit each other. So there is one of crafting, the other ones editing, and we just keep going back and forth, back and forth, back and forth as we revise, revised, revised, and sometimes someone will say this doesn't sound like this characters voice to me and they'll make it a suggestion and we just keep going and going and going. The goal is for it to just sound like it was written by one person. We we, we've said a couple times I like it being a little secret. I love. There's nothing I love more than getting text from people who know me who's like that are like, did you write cat? Wait, you wrote blank, you wrote cat. And some friends of said they've seen friends of mine that said that they've seen pieces of me in both characters. And Brady has friends have seen the same. So said the same, that they've seen one as of her. And so it's really great because we edit each other so much and we edit the chapter. So it really is a co written in every sense of the word. That's awesome. So you're not going to tell us who's who? We can tell people want to know. I think it's fun to like. I love the mystery of it. You think we're good with that? Well, Alison, like Kristen mentioned, we've had you on the show board to talk about your books, to you and me, and I said little pieces of me, which are very emotional women's fiction stories about family and loss. Our friend calling Oakley describes little pieces of me as a gorgeous, heartbreaking yet hopeful story. And Brady, you have a debut novel coming out in September called him post, which is a psychological thriller. The Mary Cubka describes as spine chillingly jaw droppingly good of you. The beach travels is so can you talk about what made the two of you decide to write about it a completely different genre? So maybe Brady of you would take that part. What made you decide to write in a different genre? And then, Alison, were their challenges in that shift for you guys? Yeah, so I'm a huge reader. I love reading and the two genres that I read the most of are probably, you know, women's fiction, especially romantic women's fiction, like this combination of sort of like family dynamics and love that type of thing. And I like thrillers, so I get my thriller fix with what I'm writing on my own. But they're really has been, a part of me that just I want to write about, like sisters and their relationship with their mom and love stories and all of that. And so, honestly, to me it's like two sides in my brain and I just really like it. It just sort of like scratches the itch on both sides and says perfect. I love it. And her her thriller and posture is so good and there's also sisters in it. So like I think that there are. You know, I think at the core there are similarities of the stories and of you know like that her writing. That comes through for me. I don't think it was as much of a departure for me because I do write, you know, my kind of Tagline for myself, my Solo Books, is stories about family, friendship, loss and love and all those things are here. But with the beach trap it's a little bit different, you know, also just because from writing with Brady she brings her her you know, creativity to it. It's definitely more romantic. In my books it's closed door, and Brady will deny this, but we were not going to do open door in this book, but...

...she wrote the sex scene for her character first and I was like, well, I can't just get get away. I know you did. Let's open door steam, and Brady is so good at the steam. She can, I always say, she can make like sitting on the couch watching TV like super sexy. Since she did it, I had to go there. So I think that that's probably the biggest difference between Alice and hammer books and Alison and Ali Brady is the is this steam. We you know, we talked a lot about where it fits in genre wise, and you know, it's not a romance, it's not women's fiction, but if you're a romance reader, there are two romances for the price of one. So there's a little bit of everything in it. That is awesome, all right. So so, ladies, a lot of our viewers are aspiring writers and and I know both of you have done so much to reach out to other writers, to lift them up, to, you know, to build this community as we were talking about earlier. But you both, as we mentioned in the introduction, are also juggling full time careers and they're busy full to the I mean they're busy careers right like you're not their busy careers that require your brain and require lots of time and all of that. Yet you have not only written these solo books, but you found time to collaborate on this book. You talk a little bit about how you each carve writing time out of such a busy life. Alison, do you want to start? Well, I'm not at the moment. I mean I think that it's really hard and I was. I was having some conversations my day you, you and me, and us is a lot about that work life balance, and so I was having a lot of conversations around that time with other people who work in advertising, other women who work in advertising, and balance. You know, I don't have kids, it tease. I don't have kids, pets or plants. So writing is like that, that other thing in my life. But I think that, like the idea of balance doesn't exist. I think that, you know, someone pointed this out, that it's almost like a seesaw, like sometimes, like writing needs to be more and sometimes work needs to be more. What the problem is sometimes they both need to be more. Like right now I've had a really busy month at work and then we're getting ready to turn in our second book. So they're when they're both really busy, you know. But part of the great thing about having a partnership is Brady has been amazing this month and really picked up my slack when I have not been able to do some things, and so there's a level of wanting to be accountable for each other but also helping each other because you have that same goal. So easier said than done. In general, when things are normal, I write in the evenings and the weekends, but balance is not always possible that way. Hey, I hear you. I think we're all that way. Life is busy. How about how about you, Brady? You know, I think one of the things that Alice and I have in common. We have many things coming, but one is that we are both we're pretty high intensity people and we like jam our lives full of things. I mean really, I just I don't like having spare time to think about anything. I don't want to have any spare brain space. I want it all packed with with family, my kids, work, I and so I'm similar to Alison. I often will write in the evenings, like when it's your bedtime for the kids. I just head up to my to my office and just write. For a long time I worked part time and so you know, then on the dews I didn't work, I would write when my kids napped. You know, like a lot of MOMS right now in full time. I might go back to part time again in the future, I don't know, but I think it's really just the thing that's nice about writing is you can do a lot of preparatory stuff in your mind as you're like driving around me, I do a lot of thinking and you're taking a shower. I'll send Alice and text and say I had shower thoughts and you can do a lot of things and then when you get ready to sit down and write it can can pour out, which is nice. And you were really close, but you don't text me in the shower. You know after were not important to attention, especially for your phone. We're getting ready to go out on a two week book or so. You never know by the end. I Know I love you. said. We're not that close yet like that. Yeah, yet. Okay, quickly before you go. Alice and we have a question from a Youwer saying at Lisa working cast saying if aspiring women writers to be can join. Every Damn Day. Absolutely, it is open to any writer who identifies as a woman, and I'll post the link to the group in the comments. Okay, wonderful. Well, thank you so much, ladies. It was so nice to have you with US tonight. It's a fantastic book. We love that it comes from your own friendship and we just appreciative that you're here. So the beach chap. We hope everyone buys it next week. Thank you for having us. Thank you so much. Why, lady, thanks for teas and US. Okay, we know a lot of you have been waiting on the edge of your seat for these next two authors. Of course, Mary Alice Monroe was one of the five founding authors of Friends of fiction back in two thousand and twenty and she has been busy writing both on her own and with her writing partner, Angela May. Mary Alice and Angela have been working together for more than a decade now. Angela began is Mary Alice is assistant, but now they write together, which is just an amazing thing to see. So last summer's the islanders and middle grade novel was their first book together. And Mary Alice, of course,...

...is the New York Times best selling author of twenty seven books, including the summer of lost and found, which was an instant New York Times best seller. In Two thousand and twenty one. She's our numerous accolades and awards, including induction into the South Carolina Academy of Authors Hall of fame. And, as you all know, Mary Alice is an active conservationist and is proud to be a twenty year plus state certified volunteer with the island turtle team. Angela is a former award winning television news journalist and the founder of May media and pr she and her husband live with her two children in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, and Mary Alice and Angela's new novel for Middle Grade Readers, search for treasure, which is a sequel to the islanders, is set to be released on June fourteen. So, Sean, can you bring Mary Alice and Angela on Hullis to be back? Hello everybody, we're so glad that you're here. This is such a treat to see to so, okay, ladies and I even listening backstage. So you might ask meeting this question, but can you start out, Angela, can you tell us what the search for treasure at search for treasure is about, and Mary Alice can use allies what it's really about. Okay, well, sir, you order. Yeah, we do. So it starts off with it's going to be the best summer ever. Right. Jake is returning to the island where his grandmother lives off the coast of South Carolina. He's ready to reunite with his best friends. He's got a really tough year at home adjusting to a new normal with his family after his father's injury, and as soon as he gets to the island and reunites with everyone. He sees the news that somebody, and older resident named scary Harry has discovered a gold coin of gold to bloom and he's like, I want to find treasure. There's buried treasure on the island. So operation treasure hunt begins and it is a summer of wild adventures, bold to bloom, just like in the bottom of the shipwreck. Well, y'all from the south, you know that every child in the southeast who knows about black beards treasure and they know it's there somewhere. So we all, every every child's looking for that goal somewhere. S Mary Alice puts it really about. I think it's all in the title. Search for treasure. These kids, it's middle grade and these are tough years for kids. You know, they they what other people think about them is so important and in one of the things I love about middle grade is that you still have really tough issues. So you have the father son relationship. You know he's what's the new normal with a prosthetic being embarrassed about that. You know his dad. You have the relationship with this boy and his family. He's nudged out by the new baby and a good little girl nervous about her dad in prison. So you have all these and of course the butting aging there twelve now, so lovely likes the boy just a little bit. We're just nudging into that kind of relationship. So they have all these adventures in there's a sense of other but at the end, ultimately it's finding that they really are the best friends, the treasures themselves and finding in their family what matters, and I think that's so important at this age, what matters, because everything's so superficial, everything you know. I know my grandkids are in ticktock and that's the whole world that I don't understand. But it's all superficial. So we're trying to bring them back to what's real. What's that? And Big Al? I think stories really about big old it's really imalligator. Yeah, that is the number one question we get asked when we go and speak to students at schools. Mary Alice, it's true. What is he real? Big As big AL. He's seventy long. That's big. So that's awesome. All right, ladies, as Christie mentioned in the intro and as we of course now you two have worked together for years. Right, I mean so and you were. You were working together in other ways before you were writing together. So I'm wondering, first of all, whose idea was it initially to write together? Mine? Yeah, I was asked how I came about it. Yeah, it was some I always knew in the back of my mind I wanted to write from this age group. But you know, we've got our novels every year. You know how that is girls. So it wasn't until I was asked to write a lead series and what I do it and I said instantly yes, but I knew it was a big job. It was you for me and I've never collaborated with an author before and I had been working with Angel for ten years and you know when you work for with someone...

...that long, and she does a lot of not writing of my novels, but has done writing. She's a journalist, she has that background, and I just wondered, you know, we like the same things, we work well together and I just said, Angela, do you ever think you'd be interested in writing a middle grade book? And then Angela what? So that was one of the easiest yeses in my life. It came totally out of left field. I had you know, and I know, I've said this to you before, Maryalice, that I had always quietly wanted to be a writer and I had been a writer, just using words in a different way, right through my career as a journalist and a media circialist. So when this opportunity came about, I was blown away. And and she had spoken out loud the thing that I had only quietly said to my husband once before, like, if I could do anything in the world and money didn't matter, I'd write children's books. And the funny thing is is, I feel like, at least for me personally and my faith, that, like you know, you might have your own ideas of what you think the good Lord wants you to do, but then he showed you just something totally different. And I never thought Middle Grade. I thought picture books and I love writing for Middle Ride with you, Mary Alice. It's so I know, in fun. What I love about this whole thing is that, even though we were working together, the serendipity of I didn't know if she wanted to do it and it just happened, and that's when that happens, at serendipity at its best. Yeah, that's true. And what if she would have gone well out of them. I probably still writing draft one. Right, all right. When Mary, as I know, when you began writing search for treasure it, part of it grew from your great love of Dewey's island and your island on Isla, palms and the beach and the belief that kids need. We talked about this so low that with our grandkids too. They need to be reunited with nature in this tech failed world. Did you go into the process knowing this would be a series, or was that something that evolved as the process went on? It was designed as a series, in fact. So I'm okay. I chose the publisher I did, is because it wasn't. It was never in my mind a one book, and so I knew that whole idea of what we I did for adults, you know, bringing nature in through stories. I wanted to do four kids because this is their world coming. This is you know, I have a lot to say and so does angel to this new generation and they're so great. This is a can do. They believe they can change the world. I just love this age. When we started, though, it was with the idea that this was one book and entity on to itself. We knew we were going to have a series, especially with the father's injury. You know, he was sick, he lost his leg, and the islanders and book too, we knew we would deal with how our father and son worked that relationship out, but we really it wasn't in the in our mind when we wrote book one. Right, Angela, we have to do one book at a time. So eve and then let it. So you just kind of let this story grow from the story you already wrote. You didn't plan out this series. You said, now that this has happened, we got not more. It went. Yeah, a little bit, so, a little bit. You know, it's fine, nice, go ahead. Well, I was going to say, don't you think that, as we took all of those scenes from book one, and Y'all probably experiences to you, you stuff your storyline full and you realize, okay, things have to go on the cutting room floor, right, and so you just say, Oh, we're saving a little bit of that for the next book. Still, right as you're working on book one, it's almost like at least little parts are bubbling and sprouting for book two in your mind and the end, and it was nice that. You know, book one lays the tracks for you, right, and so now you just have to piece your train together to follow that right path. And so, I mean it's not to say book two is totally easy, but it's nice to have parameters. Right. Well, you have your characters, you have your setting people. Until it. Can you say anything about the next book, because you're going to keep going right. Yeah, I mean talking about search for treasure and then the third one. Yes, that go it. Okay. Yes, so we are so excited to say that the story will continue into a book three. So Great. Yes, so the the details that we can say right now. At least, this is how I would summarize it. I'm curious to see how you would marry Alice. What's Your Elevator Pitch? I would say an ordinary, quick little outing out on the water turns into a emergency situation that forces three friends...

...to rely on their wits and their strength and each other just move on it. And that's really nice about watching these kids grow up. You know, they're they started at eleven and now they're twelve and they're going to be twelve in the next book. To and this is a big question, you don't have like when I wrote the Beach House series that was twenty years and Kara went from four to sixty. And yet in middle grade, I don't know. We haven't decided it. I think, going to be twelve years old forever or, you know, lost in the woods? Or do we let them grow up? And it's really cute because when you ask the kids in the audience, that age group says, Oh, let them grow up because they want to stay with them. Then that gets into Hya. So I don't know. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do, what we're going to do it. It's it's a question to be answered in the old young kids come up under them. I mean, well, that's it. Yeah, interesting to okay, so before I ask us this question, I'm so Angela. You know, obviously you've been co writing with Mary Alice and that has been extremely successful. You guys have written these amazing books and they've been so, so successful. Are you considering branching out and writing on your own? I wouldn't love to continue to stay in this world of writing. I feel like this is in such a wonderful opportunity and I've learned so much. So yes, I am also quietly working on something just my own to see what does that voice sound like, you know, and the force myself, like Y'all were saying earlier in the show, to show up every single day, but in chair, and force that story out on the papers. And I think that's what's really I think that's what's cool about Angelin my relationship. First of all, we bring to the story different points of view from age. You know, I wrote the book from my grandchildren. She wrote the book for Children, so that point of view really made the book better. But I'm I'm also an adult novelist and I'm working on my adult novels and I am so thrilled and excited to see Angela move forward on her own. You know, this is this is sort of a hope for her that I love to see. It's a mentoring process at this point in my career as well. Yeah, so, Mary Alas, I'm going to ask this question to you too, and just a second. But Angelo White, have you learned from this cowriting experience that you think you can, you know, bring forward into your solo writing? I have learned to book one was slow. We were feeling our way through all of this and we were also writing in a way that we were. She was working on her adult fiction, I was doing my pr work still, and so it was squeezing it in book too. We had to write fast and I think that this experience has taught me to just push hard and push fast. So and I like that. So that's what what I have learned. And she's also taught me so much about the art of storytelling. You know, when you're just a reader, you see books as like, Oh, that was so wonderful and and memorable and you don't want to leave that story world and sometimes you kind of don't understand why you loved xbook right over something else. But I've learned some of those elements. Mary Alice is not only a great coauthor and a great friend, but a really good teacher and patient. How many times did you say when we were working on book one, quit writing like a journalists say, show yourself easier. Thanks. Really true. There is a difference. It was interesting to hear the different earlier writers. That one writer, I think was it brady, who said that they did extensive outlining, and I think that's the one thing we did learn as a that's different for me. I outline anyway, but when I work with Angela because it's too authors coming together. The outline is critical. So we spend so much time brainstorming to get everything in the whole story and then chafter one, chapter, two and a much more in your form than I would writing for myself in a novel, because I'm writing with another person and we send it back and forth. So I think listening to Brady say that to makes me realize it probably is not unusual for for Co authors to do that. Yeah, that makes sense. Yeah, that's that's really interesting. Well, guys all, my goodness, I have had so much fun and we've all had so much fun having you on the show and getting to see you. We're so excited about this book. We I know we all just got our coffees and we were at...

...so thrilled and I'm going to start reading. I'm going to I'm start reading my with a little wilt. I was still see dad's it, Christie. That's so. My hope is that people read it with their childhood up. Yeah. Well, I love that. I love stories like this because it's hard to find things that he's interested in, but then I'm also interested in and he's obviously old enough that he's ten. So he's reading on his own. You can read anything he wants to. It's still nice to have that little time where we can sit down and read something together, but something we both enjoy is like really hard to find. So so thank you all for providing that. So when I'm glad. And so, ladies, Mary Alice, we were going to see if you would maybe stick around for all times. Saying this for a one five question and Angela, we just want to say congratulations. Were so excited and we will be cheering for you guys next week. Thanks, thank you. It's been so much fun seeing all of you and thanks for and I know both of you are on the road, some together and some separately, so we can find those on your websites right well. Thanks, Patty. Yes, we're dividing and conquering. We are. I'm on mine. I started in Angela. So it's gonna be kind of Funn you do some together. Yeah, the aquarium launch is always the most fun. Last time. Yeah, so we'll be together next week at the beginning of the week, and then she goes north, I go south. You're Kinda down here. It's so be fun. Yes, I'm anoints well's Er yeah, that's like one of the great things. Hadn't thought about about coauthoring, because you can divide and conquer on it. Guy, that's awesome missing out on our other authors. Do they go separately or do they always stay together? Yeah, it looks like they always stay together on tour. HMM. Well, Alison and Brady, of course are writing. Is One person, so I can't imagine they would split. But about starn and sure? And Yeah, this is the first time we've done it, so it'll will let you know our work. Yeah, it'll be fun. And Kristen, I'm going to be in Florida but I'm not getting all the way down to where you're located, so allow look at your toy schedule. That's a few hours, but maybe all right, I'll take a look. All right, see you guys. Thanks for having me. Alings and angel were such a treasure. Thank you. Are you are okay? Before we get to our final question for Mary Alice, just a quick reminder of our writers block podcasts. We know we usually let Mary Kay do this part because she likes to talk about dropping, but I'm gonna do it right. So we always post links on links under announcements each time a new one drops. A new episode drops each Friday. On the last episode that came out a few days ago, Ron and meg joined our podcast to talk to Carter base. He is the developer and writer of that huge TV show how I met your mother, and he has a new novel called the mutual friend. Y'All. It is such a fun listen. Then coming out on Friday and a couple days ron and I talked to Liz mccowski about her new dark reimagining of Peter Pan and her book darling girl. Y'All. This conversation was so crazy fascinating because we took a really deep dive into the back story of Peter Pan's author, jm Barry, and how it all started. Oh, I cannot wait to listen to that. I know that's what Mary Alice is a lily today. Yeah, hards a little flutter on this. Yeah, we had Mary all, she had soul and I bet you already know it. But all these interesting the backstory of the author and Peter Your Pan was originally a minor character in a different story. That's I didn't know. Wow, interest staying. Well, I can't need to listen into that anyway. All right, all right, no, it sounds so great and I you know Ron. Ron is doing such a good job at the PODCAST, so I'm so excited. It just keeps getting better and better. All right, so we know many of you out there have been participating in our very first friends and fiction reading challenge. So this month, for June, we are encouraging you to read a book from the book clubs such as Reese Witherspoon's book club, Jenna Bushaker's book club, the Good Morning America Book Club, whatever. Yeah, and of course you know our friend and Nisa Joy Armstrong, who's very active with this challenge, is also very active with Jenna Bush Haakers Book Club, so that's a kind of great tie in with her. So if you were looking for a wait keep track of those books and your other reading, we would love to recommend, as always, our beautiful reading journal at Oxford Exchange, which which also includes quotes from Mary Ealis. So it's it's like a little throwback to the founding of friends and fictions. So make sure to tell...

...us all about what you're reading. We love seeing your posts on the page. The friends and fiction official book club is having a blast and if you're not there then you are missing out. The group, which is separate from US and run by our friends Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardner, is now more than twelve thousand strong. So join them on June twenty when they will be discussing Mary Kay Andrew's new novel, the home wreckers, and make thousand. Wow, they're doing such an amazing job. It's incredible. Oh my gosh. We're so, so happy for them and so grateful for them. So everyone out there, make sure to join us for our next episode of friends and fiction next Wednesday, right here at seven o'clock Eastern, where we will welcome Emily Giffen and Harlan Coben, with Kate Quinn on the after show. If you're ever wondering about our schedule, it's always on the friends and fiction website and on the header graphic on our facebook page. And I think we're going to do the cover real for summer song birds. Well, are we being fun exciting and I think we talked about that. So I have everyone loves cover reveals, so that's wheals are the best night, guys. It's a good cover, get right for everybody to see. Yeah, that's going to be a really epic show. Yep, oh my gosh, right, really, that's going on like tonight. Just starve back. That are all right. Before we get to the last question, marry, I was somebody just sent in a comment and I love this. I've too to read. Actually, Carolyne Clement McDonald says I'm doing the islanders as a read aloud with my fourth grade English learners and they are loving it. Like you, I am planning on getting the search for treasure soon. Thank you, and this so many teachers who are doing that. We get packets of letters, ladies, from all the kids who are written to us from the classrooms. I mean so sad as this really is a sorry and Sara Grady sent Meg a letter today that says I plan on writing in on the show tonight, but I wanted to share a positive story regarding Ma'am's Mary Alis monrose Middle Grade Book, the islander. She said I wrote a grant to get one book for each of my one hundred sixth grade students this year and I had to fight like AH double hockey sticks, that's a Nerd, to get my school district administrator and department chair to allow me to read literature out of a hundred students moked, most of which were reluctant readers and are reading on at least the first to second grade level. Became hooked on Reading Literature after reading this book, Mary Alice, and inspired a roomful of students to read this summer. They laughed, they cried and we had a fantastic book club discussion at the close of each chapter. So many life lessons. Thank you for all you do, Mary Alice. Oh, thank you for reading that. That was so powerful. I mean I just am overwhelmed. Thank you, thank you. Okay, now a question. Now you know what I'm gone away. I'll try it this another you know this question because you've asked it or our guests before and it's the one we like to ask every week and they noticed when we skip it. And I don't think we've ever asked you what were the values around reading and writing when you were growing up, because I think I remember a really great story about a journal your mom found that got. Oh No, Daddy, you don't tell that. Stoprice, though you're ray one. Oh my God. Well, that's why I don't journal a lot. Actually. Okay, I've two things. One, as I come from ten kids and my mom and dad, and so it wasn't so much that my mother and dad they were very in much in the arts, but we kids, you know, there was no TV, Internet, there wasn't a lot of TV back then, Internet, nothing. So we read a lot, but we also created our own shows. We made musicals and my lot of my some of my sisters are artists, so they would paint some more musicians, they play music. I would usually write the place and we put on these extravagance has. So storytelling was always a really big part of our lives. As far as journaling. I also had very strict parents, which is why we did all the stuff inside our homes and we didn't get out much. So there was a year when all the kids were going out and sneaking out, crawling out the windows at about ten o'clock and meeting at the gas station, and so it was the eighth grade summer. So I might told my girlfriend her across the street and I put a string on my finger and held it. I literally slept with my hand out hanging out the window, and she never came. I was so disappointed I made up a story in my diary of what I did and where I saw who I saw and God only knows what I said. But my mother read it in my diary and she and I she she called me out on it and I'm like, Mama, I made it up, it's all a story. She I guess...

I was a good writer because me and she called up the parents of all the kids I named in the diary story. I was out. All my gosh, I was just fine to find I was I would you know, middle school girls can get really mean and I was ill. They all gotten trouble. So I've never had a diary. Okay, I guess. No, right goodness. My mother absolutely believed it was awesome story and thank you for that's I do my journeys. I do encourage journal you're just don't make step up your mom, if you're reading this, it's not true. Sorry, it's so much fun to laugh with you all again. Yeah. Well, thank you, Mary Alice, for coming back tonight to chat with us. We are so excited about your new release and it's proud of you for this new, you know, journey that you're on and trying something new and different than it's been so successful. So thank you for being here with Y'all, with me y'll with me when we found out the book came out number two, and it was. I did never expected the book to be disces. That was unbelieve. Of all that way, you have funny, good shad with me. Yeah, I was some good champagne with flat firs ten. I know this fun was that Chap. We were all out of goods and I went him to borrow I was like, I need your best pottle of Champagne and choose. That what happened. Uh, I just remembers popping champagne. I was so stunned. That wasn't a new were good for you really were. You were so stunned. It was really exciting. This is fun. It was. Well, it was so fun tonight to chat with these three incredible writing teams. And don't forget, you guys, you can find our back episodes on youtube or rewatch this one. We're live there every week, just like we are on facebook, and if you subscribe you won't miss a thing. So be sure to come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome Emily Giffin and Harlan Covin and Kate Quinn and the cover for the summer of song for and what a great show. That's what a night is going to be. Yes, thanks again very alice, and good night. Thank you, night, everybody. Y'All, thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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