Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Friends & Fiction with Joshilyn Jackson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bestselling author Joshilyn Jackson joins the Fab Five to discuss her latest book, MOTHER MAY I and how the shift from writing southern women's fiction to thrillers allowed her to "lean in and have a little more 'murdery fun'." They also touch on Joshilyn's acting career, her work as an award-winning audiobook narrator, and her advocacy for literacy and reform in women's prisons. http://www.joshilynjackson.com

Welcome to Friends and Fiction. Five best selling authors and the stories novelist mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson Harvey patty Callahan, Henry and mary, Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their credit In 2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviews and fascinating insider. Talk about publishing and writing and to highlight independent bookstores. These friends discuss the books, they've written the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Welcome everyone. Thank you so much for joining us on Friends and fiction where we celebrate books authors and independent bookstores. Tonight we are so thrilled to be joined by the incredible Jocelyn Jackson. I'm Christie Woodson harvey and I'll be your host tonight. I'm patty Callahan, Henry. I'm mary Alice Mango, I'm mary Kay Andrews, I'm Christine Harmel mary Kay, would you like to tell us about my mama Geraldine's y'all. I'm sorry I'm missing a beat tonight. Don't just pay me no mind. Um Yeah, before we bring johnson on, I want to tell everybody we want to thank our partner Mama Geraldine's. We love supporting this woman owned business and it is no surprise that Mama G's is the country's best selling cheese straw. Remember you can use the code Fab five to get 20% off Mama Geraldine's at Mama Geraldine's dot com snack on. Y'all were also so glad to be partnering with page one books. A subscription box hand curated by woman like Rachel Who spent her 5th birthday applying for a library card. These are the people we want choosing are you get the personal touch of an indie bookstore with the delight and surprise of an online subscription service curated just for you and your taste. First time subscribers get 10% off with the code Fab five at page one books dot com and it's the number one, not the word, one page one books. Well this week, I hope that a lot of you have already read Patties amazing essay for our partnership with parade dot com about changing careers midstream and really about what we want to be when we grow up. So this is kind of an open question and you can answer what you want to of it super briefly. Um if you changed careers, you can tell us about that or you can tell us what you want to be when you grow up, if there are any dreams that are left unfulfilled that you really want to uh get moving on. Yeah. You know, I dreamed of being a Pulitzer prize winning investigative newspaper reporter and after 14 years in the eighties newspapers change. So I decided to become a mystery writer and I did that. I wrote 10 mysteries. Then I had an idea for a different kind of a book. It had a mystery in it, but it really wasn't a category mystery. So I reinvented myself that book was Savannah Blues and um I invented myself as mary Kay Andrews and you know, I still have a lot of dreams to pursue, which I think keeps life interesting. It does, it does, you know, I did that genre switch to, I started off writing chick lit and now I'm writing historical fiction which is very different. But as far as unfulfilled dreams that I have yet to achieve, I'm still waiting to be a pop star. I mean it's going to have any Yeah, Mexica. Thank you. Mary Alice, mary Alice remembers yes, any day now guys are going to be seeing me at the Grammys, right? You're going to be the biggest thing ever. We cannot wait what they say. You're going to change your your career as your jobs five times in a lifetime. And I've done for when I was a writer when I was a little girl, I always wanted to be there when I grew up, but then I actually did write writing for higher, but for a short time in journalism and I totally switched and got my degrees in japanese and I was a teacher in japanese and then I taught english as a second language was a teacher and then I went to bed with my third pregnancy and I wrote my novel and I'm where I'm supposed to be. I never want to change again five times. The char you're not going to come on the road as part of my rock band. Is that what you always that in my hand, you alright? Tambourine would be about. The only thing I could play in any band when I grew up, you know my dad is a creature and I had to be in the choir and I can't sing, so they always just gave me the tambourines or the little finger...

...triangles triangles I You more Yeah, the essay I wrote was about changing careers midstream and this idea of that it's never too late to become and change. And it happened for me when I asked my daughter when she was six years old and I'm with her right now and she has a two year old, so it seems a million years ago and I said what do you want to be when you grow up? And she said I want to be a writer of books and I said no, that's what I want to be when I grow up and she said you're already grown up and that's when everything changed. Yeah, mm So what about now any anything anything else on your bucket list that you really need to do? No, I think, I think like mary Kay said there's always other dreams to fulfill but I think at this stage in our life it's never too late, you know you can always say and I changed genres completely and re taught myself a whole new skill set and you know, if there's something else that I see that answers that question, what do you want to be when you grow up? Um It's something interesting to ask ourselves every once in a while and sitting here what the answer might be. You know, I think I've told you all this before on the show but I'll mention it again that I have this recurring dream about writing a song with James Taylor. So I feel like that is in my life path. And I was telling a group that I was at dinner with on saturday night about this and they were like very into it. They were like well I mean you need to get on that and like you know you'll both have U. N. C. And the data and like all these I think I was like guys I don't know that. I think this is like actually gonna happen. Like it's just a dream I have but you know hey strain hey you never done step. But I bet every single one of us, every single one if somebody were just said to us years and years before we had books published, there's going to be a day when you're going to be a best selling author having a show about authors and writing. We go, yeah, well, night shift is the nurse or Cathy you were working night Yeah, Right. If someone had said to me that I would know any of you, I would have been like, I let me tell you 40 years ago, I was covering Disney on ice and I brought that the pinnacle of my I have reached the pinnacle of my career. I have covered, you know. Yeah, well, Mr still calls James and I will write your first hit single. Mr it's awesome. Maybe if you're lucky, I'll let you and shames open for me. Thank you. Thank you. That's great. I'll play the triangle. Okay. You want to play that. You want the team. I'll give you more if you don't give up. So okay Jocelyn, because there's someone that has really amazing dreams and has accomplished a lot now onto the reason we're here, Jocelyn. Jackson is the new york Times best selling author of nine novels, including her latest spectacular Mother May I, which just released yesterday um in the vein of changing career, she's also a trained actress. And let me say if you have not listened to one of the audio books that she is narrated, you are missing out. So tonight she's going to be telling us about the inspiration behind her latest novel, her real life philanthropic endeavors and of course, you'll all have the chance to ask your questions live, so go ahead and get them in Now let's welcome, josh, Lynn, We're so excited, you're here, they need to be here. Well, let's talk a little bit about this riveting new novel, Mother May I, I just have to say the title even kind of like gives me chills, like it's just it's so good. I love it. But can you tell us a little bit about your book? Sure. It's a story of I don't know if you've been in charge of a kid for more than 90 seconds at the time. You know, you've had the experience where you look up and that kid has just gone every time they've scored it under a bush to look at a lizard or there the wallpaper behind the stuff. Uh Yeah, because they're weird. That's not what happens to bree my narrator, he looks up and her son is gone, the baby. He's 10 weeks old and he's gone. And in his place is a note that don't go home. Don't call your husband, don't call the police. Just do what I say. And if you've read any of you books ever before, you know, this is not a straight up kidnapping ransom thing. And all of my books, the past has a pulse. The past has teeth. It's coming for free. It's a little bit of a...

...revenge fantasy as well as a healer, which I really like. So Mhm wow. Well, I have to say it's the title says a lot. It really does. It does. And the great cover, by the way, and for me, you talked about how one of the most important keys to your success overall is that you married a partner who supports you. And we all know that carries over into every aspect of your work, that, you know, the pressure you have to have someone there behind you. And I have to say I'm really lucky in that respect to. And you also talked about the inequality of women and work and how that was really spotlighted during the pandemic. And so can you describe to everyone how these ideas show up in your novel? Oh, sure. So I think that's kind of a running theme in a lot of my work honestly. Like, I think that's very true about me is I'm not really interested in writing. I write women, I'm much more interested in women's lives. That's what I want to write about. And I want, like, I want my women to be people who act not people who react because I think women are sort of seen as reactors more than actors. And um like, you know, like when I talk about the things that my husband does for me and then the things he's done that have made my career possible, people just act like it's this crazy. Oh, that's just so weird and amazing. I don't know a male writer who doesn't have a wife. Yeah. It's like he doesn't the things he does, if he was my wife, nobody would blink. Good points. So true. But also for the do you think that the women during the pandemic? I I mean I've been reading a lot about women too about how they were Stockholm with the kids and their jobs trying to do it. It just seemed to really be, yeah, kids and their jobs and women are also taking care of the relatives, elderly relatives. Yes. It's like and so so many women, like the jobs that have been lost or almost all female jobs as women are sort of returning home. Yeah, such a good point. So one of the things that fascinates me as a writer is how nimbly you move between genres. So you're both an accomplished women's fiction author and a writer of these page turning domestic suspense stories. So can you tell us a little bit about whether your process differs when you're writing different kinds of novels? And are there common threads that you find when you're kind of going from genre to genre now? I mean not just in your own writing but kind of in the genres or maybe just books in general are their threads that take you from one to another? Uh yeah, I kind of did the mary Kay Andrews thing and the thing that you did where I have changed genres after writing eight women's fiction Southern novels, I'm straight up writing domestic drillers now and for me it was an accident like I was part, but I just I'm very instinctive and I run everything from my lizard brain, you know, it's all back here. But if you look at my, my first eight books, I was always killing somebody in my first, killed somebody in Alabama like that in Mississippi and I would cross state lines, kill somebody in Alabama and then go back to the book true, realize like I could murder someone in Georgia. But there was always spread domestic suspense money for books and I think what I happened was I hit 50 like I'm southern and I'm I'm a lady Person and I just like a real nice, like I want you, I'm real, real nice around the murder. That would convince you that I'm a very sweet person. I am not. And now that I'm 50 far. Yeah, so true now that you've ever broke and it was just like the storylines I've been wanting to write, just rose this versus do you feel more like you that you're writing these stories now? I mean, I do like, like I am and the self I'm meant to be because I've gotten to the place I am. Do you feel like that with the books are right now? Maybe more like I'm the self I am now because I will say this the writing southern fiction, there were things I wanted to say about the south that I tried, I tried to say and I really feel...

...like with the illness sisters, I said one of the things I've been trying to say, like I'm never going to say it any better. And so it's sort of released. I mean, I'm sure other people have said it better, but I'm not going to be able to say it any better. So it kind of released me from that and let me lean in and have a little more murdering fun. Not so much a mistake. Kind of the intention was there. Sure you got a mistake. What you say is sneaking or what was the word you use? Happy accident or? Yeah, we're just instinctive as opposed to intellectual. So are you a plotter or a panther or did this sort of like does it change for, you know, I wish I was a plotter. Okay, so even in me, even in your domestic suspense, you are OK, interesting. I have no idea what's going to happen, but I know the characters really, really well, really well and everything, even if like another thing that hasn't changed for me is my my fiction is really character driven. Like all the suspense comes out of who these people are and how they're in relationship with each other. So um and that hasn't changed and my process hasn't changed. I I obviously don't know my books have changed that much. Like I think that the only real change moving from one job to the next is that these, these thrillers have a bigger faster engine where like the army like you're so funny. So before I dive in, I have to tell everyone at friends and fiction that surviving savannah is a better book because of you Jocelyn. So when I was writing surviving Savannah, I have a dive scene for those of you who have read it. And I called Jocelyn just for one question, she said immediately send me the whole scene. I'm not just giving you one piece of advice. So thank you Jocelyn. But what I want to talk about a pain in the butt, like I'm a scuba diving pain in the butt. It was actually very detailed, but pain in the butt lesson for all of us. We know especially not even especially historical fiction because that has nothing to do with the history. If you get that wrong. I get the letter right. I totally from the diver who tells me what I got wrong and I don't want that maybe are psychotic about it like scuba divers. I don't know. There's not many casual scuba divers. I know the people who are like I am going to, when can I go scuba diving again? And my husband and I are rabbit, rabbit and I went once and the second time I went, I couldn't, I swore there was no oxygen in the tank and I've never been again. So what I want to talk to you about about a little bit more than the book. As fabulous and twisty and wonderful as it is. You have a fascinating and world changing passion project and I know that we've talked about it and but you volunteer in women's prisons where you say that you have learned a lot about class about privilege, privilege, about poverty and about who gets second chances and when, and then the way that role affects the outcome in your life. So I want you to talk a little bit about that and how it influenced this novel. So reforming arts dot org is a small nonprofit based here in Georgia. Um, we're in partnership with a lot of other nonprofits and we're also in partnership with Georgia State University. So when we go into the prisons, we are offering a degree seeking program and pre pandemic. I taught with them as a volunteer for seven years. Um, currently we're mostly focused on our reentry programs. So returning citizens like helping them process trauma, find job and educational opportunities. Um, that's sort of what we're looking at until we can get back into the prisons and continue our like we have students who are in mid degree who are trying to change their lives, who nobody can get in there because it's dangerous. Um, for me as a person who is, I mean, look at me, look, you look at me, don't I look like I'm about to rise up and organize a bake sale. I am, What are you saying? Just, I just, you know, I'm, I'm not, if I get pulled over for speeding or whatever and I like, I don't know, I'm not gonna people believe me when I talk, like you look at me, I'm white, I'm middle class. I'm, I'm clearly a person who's had education. I have, I use big words. I'm um, everything about me is palatable and makes police want to be nice to me. I look like a citizen and if you are...

...poor, if you are color, if you don't come out of the kind of family I came out of where I was loved and nurtured and supported and taught you know how to be connective and all that kind of stuff. The way you present yourself, you're not going to get, you might be doing absolutely nothing wrong. But the in the same way that people look at me and think she's on her way to a bake sale if you if I was black and if I was or if I were any or not working class, but like just in that kind of abject poverty, we don't like to look at in this country. I would not be given all of the second chances and assumptions. You don't even notice it like you don't notice. And this book is definitely like I want to write a thriller where you are welcome to make yourself a giant aviation and go down to the beach and read it and have a good time and Lord be with you enjoy. That's what it's for. But also if you have a book club and you want to talk about issues of class and race and especially justice. Like this is a revenge story. This is a story about who gets second chances. And Um, and I didn't even get second chances. I've gotten like 486 Jesus. So so many restarts and do overs. I've been just blessed with and given. And sometimes if you are a person who doesn't come across in those ways, like you get one chance and if you mess up that one chance, it's very easy for people like, well she had a chance and she not ever seeing how many chances they've had and, and that's what this book is. I'm not good at left right, that it's about three yard can't. Yeah, I know. Yeah. Well, thank you. Oh God. I mean, Jocelyn just thinking about the women that you have met and the women that you have touched by doing this work, How could it possibly not at some point work its way into your creative work because you are always like, your intent are always up, you're always paying attention. There's no way that something that powerful and impactful cannot find its way into your creative work. And then I like it really rankles me unjust. It is unjust. I think. I think that's something more and more of us uh for thinking about these days. Um, unfairness. I mean, my mother always used to say, who taught you, who told you life was fair and you know, I kind of thought it was and then you get out in the world and you go, well, no, it's not all right, I'm speaking of Children and motherhood, um we can't have you on to talk about a book called Mother May I without a talk without asking you to talk about motherhood. One of the most interesting things to me about this novel is, and I hope this is not a spoiler. The kidnapper is actually a mother herself. Yeah, so that's a spoiler. You learned that so quickly, and I was like that, and she really understands right, that despite the trauma, um but she is putting her through the kidnapper, she understands a kidnapper. How does talk to us about how motherhood and different aspects of motherhood? What kind of a role does that play in this story? So, you know, obviously Stockholm syndrome is at work, but um the if somebody has that much power over you, you need to invest them with something you can love or else you're too terrifying. Like, you know the psychology of that. So that's at play. But it's also true that the person who has robert is a mother and brie comes to like she also like breathe is this breed is a person who grew up on the very bottom rung just clinging to middle class, like the kind of thing where you're not food insecure and you have a place to live, but like a car breaks down, it's a major emergency, you're homeless, but she's been very upwardly mobile. She got a scholarship, she married really well and she's just moved this way. She's and that's my life trajectory to like she's now ever middle class. Well, this woman started in the same place and her trajectory went the other way she breathes like this rich trophy wife. But as they're talking and as this, you know, as this plays out, they she comes to understand that she and bree are very much alike and breed comes to understand that too. And they they're both like they get all this empathy for each other even though each of them is...

...fighting for their own child. So they're heading concentration. There's no way for that. If it's your kid, you're gonna blow up the universe, right? You have to, even as they're heading toward this conflagration, they come to really understand each other. It's one of my favorite things about the book. Yeah. Kind of respect for the combatants on the field. Right. Right. It's like, you know the stories about World War Two when the there in the trenches and you know, somebody rises up out of the german side, somebody rises up out of the american side and they kind of nod at each other. Yeah, well Jocelyn, as you might know every well as you definitely know, because you helped us with this this week, every week we highlight an independent bookstore to encourage our viewers to support Indies, who are the bedrocks of our communities. So especially um tonight is we're celebrating small communities. So Jocelyn, why did you choose Little shop of stories? So this is a book about motherhood and little shop of Stories As our local Children's book stops all the moms are in there all the time. And I picked it for a couple of reasons first of all, because um they do have a very small, highly curated adult fiction section and they always sell my books there, which makes me feel really good because it's a very small thing. And also because in brea is a mom and in Mother May I her daughter like it's kind of funny like here's this her whole world is blowing up, she's ditched her daughter's at her mother's house so that the daughters have no idea any of this is going on. And her oldest daughter who's like 13 is like I need I am Malala from my book report. She's like this this weird little thing happens where here she is in the middle of this conflict conflagration and there's this child who needs there, they're blue hoodie and there and she's like go to a little shuffle stories and buy a copy mom, you know, great! So it's a great, yeah, that's a great store. I um I read all, you know, all of us get all these emails from bookstores because we love them and were on their mailing list. And so when I get an email from little Shop about especially my grandkids, love y a it's great. I can call their or I can you know, text or email and they'll have the book wrapped and waiting at the door and that's an amazing thing. Yeah, they always do gift wrapping. It's beautiful. I love the gift wrap. Gift wrap is the best and they do great events to I just want to say this does have the word Mother in the title Mother's Day Mother's Day. They say we'll wrap it for you and it will be pretty like they're wrapping. That is exactly what I was going to say is that books make such great mother's day gifts and little shop of stories is offering a 10 discount on mother May I as well as the five of our new and upcoming releases. And all you have to do to get your discount is mentioned. Friends and fiction in the comments and requests gift draft. I think because that sounds really great nations coming up to trap is free. They just do it. That's all right. I truly choose my stores and what I purchased based on who gets wraps like hands. I really do because I hate to get dr I'm bad at it. I bet it Well we have had our chance to ask questions to Jocelyn and now it is our viewers turn so mary Alice. Would you like to start us off? I will. I have a question from Georgia Perkins and I think we had this question before. We had such fun with the answers. Here you are. Do you ever talk to your characters or writing a book? I would love to say no because we know you do. I We could have voted what your answer was. I bet we would have all said I so I'm out of theater. My background is in theater. I don't just talk to them. I talk as them a good answer. That's cool. But sometimes in the car like I tend to really think about my books, my on board like and yeah, being boards important and collar and I will be like in a fight between two characters and I look over and see like somebody's staring me and then I have to pretend like it's you know, queen or something, you know, like just singing it. Hold up your thumb. Yeah, I'm talking about that's right, happier. You're...

...like, oh, I've got a question from Anissa Armstrong. And she says, Anissa says, Mother May I is definitely one of the books that you cannot put down. She loved it. And she has great taste. You know, you've narrated all of your books before. Why did you decide to narrate them? And has that been difficult? And I thank you, kind of already answered that because obviously you talk to your characters and they talk back and then you just talk into a microphone. Yeah, I mean, if it's women, it's my own book, it's very easy because I've heard them and I've been doing their voices for a year and a half while I was running the book. But I also married for other people too. And sometimes, like, I really only do it if I liked the book. Like, I'm not it, it's not a thing I have to do is the thing I love to do. And I do it just enough to qualify for a sag card over here. And I only take a and then sometimes you'll writer that you really love will ask you to read it and you'll be like, oh my God, and you'll be so honored and you'll take the job and then you'll read the book and realize that you have to learn to do an irish accent. It's mine. That's the hard part of the, but anybody that was the bookshop Atwater's ends. Yeah, that's a favorite. Do you read the favorite daughter? The favorite daughter? The favorite daughter for me? She was my audio on their radar. I don't want to these books. I was so excited when she asked me to do it that way. I could do that patty always. I love patties book. So I know I'm gonna love it. I know it's going to be set in the south. I'll be able to do all the exits so that I'm like, oh, they're all irish call awesome. I was actually irish. No, even I do my own audio books, but I I didn't do the one with all the foreign accents because I'm not trained in acting like you are, but I have to say I just not to you for that. Yeah, I can only do irish when you get a couple of Guinness is in me and then I'm not very good at reading anything, thinks she can do irish. Yeah, really horrible. But it feels good to me when I'm a couple of witnesses and yeah, there was not a lot to be a lot of irish, it was like a couple of sentences. Yeah, but still you you labored. I know well, so I was going to say we're going to take a couple questions from the live feed and this one is kind of a good follow up to that. So it's from pam Erickson Guardo and she says you're such an amazing and skillful narrator. Can you tell us a little bit more about the process of creating the audio book and how you actually prepare for it other than learning irish accents? No, I don't prepare for it at all. If it's my book, because why would I like, I know exactly what every line should sound like I go into the studio, it's for I mean I would just make the voices with my husband who's Master's degrees in theater. Like this is how I met him actually, we did summer stock theater together and the first thing that ever saw him, he was learning swordfighting on stage high. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So, um well he'll help me, like he'll listen to me and he'll be like, I know it sounds that way in your head, but you need to drop it a little bit like he's very great. But if it's somebody else's book then I spend a lot more time. That's why I don't do it very often because it's a lot more prep work where I really look a couple of times and I make a list of the important characters and I practiced voices a lot more with my husband until I get a good sense of it like that. And then it's just four days. It's 3-5 days in the studio depending on how long the book is. And you just read it and you have a director in your ear and you have a sound engineer. I love it. It's a way to be back in theater which was my young womanhood and my first love. But it's a lot of hard work and you sit still your stomach can't growl, your tongue gets tired, it's not easy. So I get that bad to you again. Did you read Mother May I? Mhm. Okay. How did you do that in the pandemic? I did not read one because of the pandemic. I didn't want to the studio. Well the studio where I read is um is in the East Atlanta Village and I mean I've worked with them for so long and they told me what their protocols would be like. Only one reader would use a studio at a time and they had an air filter running in there the whole time. I would go...

...there and clean it myself, like it would be and you would just go in and go to your box and then you would just stay like you would bring your own lunch, you would really only leave to go to the bathroom and um the sound engineer are in different places the whole time you're reading like they've had an air filter running all night, and nobody else goes in the studio, great, and you're alive. So it must have worked. You're still here. I'm thinking it worked. Yeah. Okay, shots, yep. Okay, so Licia Haney wants to know do your book characters, which I want to know too. We all know now you talk to your characters, you have conversations in the car, but she said, do your book characters talk back to you and if they do have you had to change something because of it? I know that's when I know the book is working, like I'm a panther talking about. I know the book is working when the narrator begins to do things that make me wildly uncomfortable, and it used to be that I would fight the narrator and try to write nicer and then I would end up with you know, as long as I thought all of that would have to be thrown away. I'm better now to where when a narrator starts wanting to do something that makes me really uncomfortable, I realized I'm writing toward the book. Uh what you just said, I wanted to fight the narrator and make them nicer. Could we just sum up being southern right there? Yeah, that's exactly right the narrator and make her nicer. Okay. So I have to ask you this because I think it's so funny. So Sue johnson Bishop said does your husband read your books? And is he scared? Yes. He reads all my books before they even go to my editor and then he reads them. Was throughout he's like my big fan and I love it. I think I'm pretty. Yes, he will. Should, which is a bonus. Always the best. Yes. Yeah. The only person I let read my books before my husband reads them is actually my mother because I wouldn't let my mother read them right out like first draft when they're genuinely terrible because she has no idea. They're terrible. It's like going to the ship I did when I was five and she was like, this is the best shit I know your mother moderator. And she's like that about my books. Like I'll send her a complete crap and she'll be like, well I think it's your best friend and then I'll I'll send it to her when it's actually good and she'll be like, I just didn't see how you could make it any better. But you did like that's awesome. That's exactly how my mom is. And I sent her the really tragic, trashy first draft and she'll be like, oh it's just amazing. And I only found a few little things and I'm like, she never Find missing. Yeah, like, like you actually messed up the entire timeline, but it's fine. No one I would be mad. I mean she can see it in other people's looks very easily, but she can't see the flaws, she thinks it's the best. She's just I mean she literally is blind to it in this very biased, kind of lovely. That's her job as your mother to bolster your threats to europe, right? Well, one of our favorite parts of the show is listening to our guest authors, writing tips and so Jocelyn we know that you have an amazing piece of advice that you can offer to all the writers listening in and more importantly to the five of us on this screen, you hear anything and all of you know this and I can say a million things, but because of the way the conversation has gone, I'm gonna say this the best thing for yourself as a writer is put yourself in a situation where your board, uh, um, you're riding brand will kick on to entertain. You take take, you know, you go see the world's largest ball of twine and drive or clean out a closet. You want, you're after go like fix your child's closet. It will resolve itself so, but you can't do those things while listening to an audiobook or you just have to let your mind wander. Yeah, you may be put on music if you're the kind of person that doesn't notice music or you put on a kind of background is sort of music, but that's it make your give your brain like a big open field where it doesn't like, you know, the worst thing about this pandemic is like everybody's what netflix is always there because you're already at home, you've got to like...

...clear space your own uh mm Yeah, so while we're talking about writing, what book have you read lately that you have loved and want to share with us? You got an early copy. Lucky you, I'm interviewing her. I had to be vetted. Oh, I don't know what that means, how you got through the vetting. That's crazy. I'm Catherine, Come on. I think that they saw that during her campaign and then after I had the money shovel, I'm clearly already a huge fan of this woman and this is just the so fine. It's really good. I can't, I'm excited to talk with her about it. It's a really good book. It's I like thrillers as you know and this is kind of a political, it's a burner I guess I would call it. And you are vetted before you came on the show and use the phrase murdering fun. So, which is a great phrase right? Somewhere like the Abrams publicist is pushing a button going, no, no, sorry, I met her. But yeah, she's um so that would be my and like her tour is being set up right now and it's almost as ticketed and it'll be limited. So if you are interested in any of the conversation she is going to be doing online, you should google that nonsense and get a ticket. Oh good. Thank you. Love it. Does anybody else have a recommendation? I think Patty, you might have had one I just wanted to mention and remind everyone because she's been on her show, Lian Dolan, her satellite sisters. The book we all love so Much is out in paperback yesterday. So I want to tell everybody about that. And um mary Kay, you'll be telling us more later. She's going to be with her sisters on Our Mother's Day show. So yeah, well, we're all going to be with the Sisters. Well, yes. Um, and I don't know if you guys saw it in our newsletter, but a couple of weeks ago we recommended a debut called Waiting for the Night Song by julie Carrick Dalton. So I just wanted to mention that on the show. It's a beautiful, beautiful debut novel. It has had tons of acclaim and with Earth Day right around the corner coming up, it's a really good time to read it. So if you haven't checked that out, it's a great opportunity to support a debut author and read a really beautiful book. So, Jocelyn, we have one final question for you that's coming up right after a few announcements. So everybody hold tight. I just want to mention one more time, page one books. It's a wonderful cure bookstore that curates. We have so many books we want to read, especially if I hear from our fans all the time. My T. B. R. Piles just getting bigger and bigger and bigger or page one books Talks to you figures out what you love. They curate your books and you get a book every month meant just for you. So every single week it's like your birthday. It's really wonderful and it's an Evanston where I was born. So I particularly fun to page one books and it's a wonderful place and I hope you all give it a try. Yeah. And um let's talk about our partner Mama Geraldine's or Mama G, as we call her on the show, makes the best Yeah, we're about that Mama G's makes the best cheese straws on the planet. So I go to Mama Geraldine's dot com, plug in fab five. And you will get a very nice discount right after I have a crazy So we can enable we can enable problem. A good southern girl. And I think one time I said you'll get this as a good southern girl there, cheese straws. So good, you can take them to the church picnic and we just find I got one of those Used to be when you got married in the 70s, you got this this thing that would allegedly make cheese straws you made the day and you had to like squeeze it out. Remember that? Yeah. My cheese straws look like spermatozoa. Everything I finally, you know, gave away, gave that away and now I find my cheese draws from Yeah, she's just love language. If I give you I think we have to use that cheese straws. I love language. I love it. I love it. Well, all of you out...

...there, we have so much great stuff coming up. So next week join us for our special celebration of our one year anniversary. Can you find a year, one year? So on our show next week we're going to have the one and only jodi PICO and I know so many of you have asked for her. You've been asking for her all year. We finally have her. We're so excited. So in the meantime, visit our page for great giveaways like a custom made 12 inch dino retro desk lamp in teal and white, which is worth $319 which is amazing. Um from our friends at barn light electric plus any first year friends and fiction guests book of the winner's choice. So more information is available on our facebook page. Um, and we're just going to be having fun all month long, including our april 21st episode. We will be celebrating this very special book which is our own Christie. Woodson Harvey's released under the southern sky. Weird. Don't miss next week and then don't miss Christie's big launch the week after that. Well thank you and and Erica, I think you have a video you might be able to share for us of some of the very special moments from our very special first year just to sort of wet everyone's appetite a little bit for our wonderful celebratory episode. So so someone saying, hey don't do this, that just tells me I'm on the right track if I believe in that. But you know, the the human things, they don't change the human things are what ties us all together um that love a family that need to know your history, that need to know your people. Um you know that that that's the thai that's the bond we have that makes us all the same. I think, yeah, did I barely graduated from high school? I mean, I did I struggled for years to learn how to read and I think it's just kind of God's joke. You know, it takes somebody who didn't learn to read and make them a best selling author. Mhm. It certainly changed my life completely because I felt so grateful to live. So per family thankful. Um and I thought I am strong enough to get through this. So many people are not and they stay silent, but I want anyone who thinks they can speak about it to say this happened to me and I'm not ashamed. It is not my not my shame that this happened. It is the shame of the person who did this to me and I will not let him hold me down. Women particularly, we all women particularly need to do something at least once in our life. That takes our own breath away. I love that. And I remember sitting back thinking, okay, this is mine, this is mine. So sort of initially take my breath that I would kind of go way, way out on the literary limb with this. But I was very compelled to do it and for I never looked back after that. All right, that was, wow! I get yeah, totally watch. And we got to watch Kristen's bangs grow out like all are so funny and thinking about next year Jocelyn next year we'll have a clip of Jocelyn on our second birthday discussing talking about murdering bits or how lizard green or that the roller coaster, right? Like, you know, you look at all the best and they're more to come, it's pretty amazing, so fun. Alright, Jocelyn, one final question and it's my favorite that we ask every week, we love asking about the values around reading and writing, growing up, what they were for you, how, how they, how you think they made you a writer or didn't. And even in for this novel, I had the kind of, you know, we moved around a lot when I was growing up and I had the kind of mother who would find the library before she found the Piggly wiggly common bread. Yeah, right allowed to me and like when we would move again, you know, would be someplace a year and then would move and I would leave my school and my...

...friends. But I knew like Trixie Belden would be waiting for me and nancy Drew would be waiting for being joining and the barbarian would be ways from my ongoing friends. So yeah. And she read aloud to me like when, when my brother and I were babies and being, you know, colicky nightmares, she would just walk us and she would just read whatever she was reading aloud. Just two. That's beautiful image. Yeah. So I was like, I read Like F Scott Fitzgerald when I was two weeks old. Oh, that's awesome. And I think we found that almost every time, almost I'd love to look at the percentage y'all. When we asked that question, somebody says the libraries when there's absolutely it's a tribute. For sure. For sure. Well, Jocelyn, you have been the most incredible guest. Thank you so much for being here to celebrate the launch of Mother May I with us tonight. Um, I know everyone, I'm friends eviction is going to rush right over to little shop of stories and purchase your fabulous new book and mention friends and fiction in the comments for 10% off. So thank you. But yeah, I, they are well, thank you down anybody's look here. So why stop with one? Absolutely. Especially with the wrapping. Come on. Yes, This looks so nice. Gift wraps. I think Mother's Day Mother's Day Mother May I have just saying exactly. I'm marketing. Did not think of that at all. Uh, but yeah, thank you for having me. You guys are so much fun and I think you're just doing a great stuff for authors and books and I just appreciate you so much. Thank you. Thank you for not having you on the basketball with the rest of your launch week. Thank you. Well that is our show for tonight. If you've missed episodes, you can catch them on our website at friends and fiction dot com or on our Youtube page as well as parade dot com facebook where every week one of us offers an essay on life and check out our podcast as well for lots of fun content and interviews that you will not find on facebook. That's a wrap. We'll see you next week by all. Fine. Thank you for tuning in, Join us every week on Facebook or YouTube where our live show airs every Wednesday night at seven p.m. eastern time and please subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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