Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode 13 · 1 year ago

Friends and Fiction with Karin Slaughter

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Karin Slaughter joins the Friends & Fiction crew to discuss her unconventional path to selling more than 35 million novels worldwide. https://www.karinslaughter.com

Welcome to friends and fiction by bestselling authors, andless stories. Friends infiction is a podtast withfive best selling novels, whose common love of reading writing and independentbookstores bound them. Together with chest, author interviews andfascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. These friendsdiscussed the books, they've written the books they're reading now and theart of storytelling. If you love books and you're curiousabout the writing, world you're in the right place: bestselling Novelis, Marit, Amens,Cristen, Harmel Christ, wodson Harvey Patty Callahan Henry and Mary Alimonroe,our five long time. Friends with more than eighty published books to theircredit at the start of the pandemic, they gottogether for a virtual happy hour to talk about the books, your favoritebookstores, writing, reeding and publishing in this new uncharteredterritory. They're still talking and they' added, fascinating discussionswith other best selling novels, so joined tem lie on their friends andfiction, paceful Groud page every Wednesday at seven PM, eastern orlisten, and you later at your leisure, everybody welcome. You were here withus at friends and fiction, and we are so glad I am Cristien Herbel and I willbe your hose tonight. My latest novel is the Book of Lost Names, I'm Christy Woodson Harvey, and mylatest book is piels like falling I'm Hatti Calahan Henry and my latest isbecoming misss Lewis. You might notice that we are a few hostess down tonight. We just ot a mouse sort, oferecent INArecent development, Mary canders, had to be elsewhere tonight and sense. HerLove Mary Alice was supposed to host tonight, but her ned is out, so I amtaking over the hosting duties and I apologize in advance for Um anyinsanity that I bring upon us this evening. I thinkthat'sae for the. I think they like the Insaniti so thmass year, the better. Sohere we are trying to muddle our way through without the two Merris, but intheir place, is the more than capable caren slaughter who happens to be a NewYork Times and numberl international besselling, author and tonight we arecelebrating Karen's hotyew release this silent wife, which just debuted on theNew York Times list tonight. I believe at number two. Our number ten on theprintlist and number four under combined is that Rit Caren can y ShitUrcra Gradat mazing good for you, and it was such a tough meek too. Such asuch a lot of books came out such a crowded list, so fantastic good for you.Um Mary Alice also left us. This wonderful quote from your starredreview from booklast, which his flaugter adds depth to her best sellingseries, with the investigations of olds and current cases, while also advancingthe key personal relationship, another slam, dunks o congratulations on yourslam, tunk, so Karon slaughter is one of theworld's most popular and acclaimed novelists she is published in Wow, onehundred and twenty countries. That's amazing, with more than thirtyfive million copies sold across the globe, but she's a southern girl, anative of Atlanta, her stand alone, novel pieces of her is in developmentwith Netflix and the Grant County and will Trent series are in developmentfor television. The Silent Wife is the tenth book in the Will Trent series.But if you are one of the few who have not read the series, the silent wifecan be read as a stand alone. You all know out there that every week weselect and independent books fare at a highlight in our effort to support ourindies, which is such an important thing, especially now, especially whenso many of them had to go through having their doors closed and thingslike that, and this week Karen Shose, a...

...bookstore that is actually a favoriteof all of us, foxtailed books in Woodstock, Georgia, just outside ofAtlanta. So it's a home store for Karen and a store that has supported all ofus and that we all love visiting so hello, foxes and H and we're just sohappy that we're working with them tonight so m. let's see yea, everyonehere has had wonderful events with the boxes. They go out of their way to takecare of us and make sure that every event is special and they will takegood care of you out there too. They are giving us ten percent off ofCarrent Slaughters. The silent wife, as well as all of the FAB fives or recentbooks, and Best of all Foxtell, has signed copies of Karen's books, sohurry before they're gone. The Link to the bookstore is posted on the friendsand fiction bacebook page and remember you get that ten percent off, if you bythrough that link. So Karen without further ADO, welcome. Thank you so muchfor joining US tonight. Can you start by telling us a little bit about howyou have been spending your time during this crazy codomic like this? Basically, it's a Cin, Igoyeah all my my tours were converted to virtual and then publishers, indother countries found out and they were like hey. Can you do that? And so I'vebeen doing a lot Um? And you know it's Kinda good 'cause.Usually, if you want to be on television in Aukland, you have toactually be there, but this way everybody's doing it virtually, whichis great. But then you know that's like a getting up at three a M. basically'cause. It's is weird 'cause. They just they're,not following our clock right. Yes, so bizarre! It's like it'salready tomorrow there and I'm like. Do you still have cobed, I'm Likeno? We got rid of that lastweek. Knowwe took care of it, we're twoislands. We can do that. That is true. How is it did not being on the road topromote this book? I mean I assume that for your other, your previous books andyou've done this so many times now. I assume you're out there, interactingwith fans visiting bookstores. How has it been for you, aside from all thevirtual events, just staying home? Well, it's it's been hard because this is a aseminal year for me, my twentieth and a lot of the people not seaming, likeseamen, Simila, look it up, but I I usually see the same people all thetime and you know on one hand it's really kind of Shitty 'cause they'rerecently they show up these women and they got babies and they're. Likehere's, a picture of me when my mind brought me- and I was a baby and I'mlike go fuck yourself Um, I don't want to know how old I am. Why do you gottalike show me photographic evidence that I have aged um? So maybe it's betterfor sales that I'm not out there. I don't know but onedhing I miss is like when you get ona plane and you're like that's over. No, it is not its hit's continuing, butit's good. I mean honestly, I would be wearing the same clothes if I wastouring. So it's not that much of a heart. I don't wear shoes, Um Wwhen, I'm touring. I do have to wearshoes. So that's ATS, anouse! We don't even have to actually get dressed fromthe wast dos, often over, not anode from the Waystown M. I made an agreement about thattonight. All of us yeah. It's weird though 'cause you're like what's thaton the floor. Oh, but you know, I've just been adjustingand like Maryk Andrews, who also has the alias like from back when she wasin prison of Cathy. He lives right down...

...in the street for me and we stillhaven't seen each other. You know every time we see each others when we do emThotosho they're like Oh, we need Atlanta artists or Atlanta th. Thosegirls will show up. Lels Kep them on O is usually her. Me Is in RebeccaWhite Um Tasha try thaway WHO's like. Why am I with you losers? No, I waslike the poet laureate and I'm with you guys, erelike, you shouldn't. Have youshouldave been in New York 'cause? This is that you're in the wrong place. At'syou're called yeahs like? U, unless Patty comes you know, then itlike classes it up just a little bar. They don't realize I moved so they justkeep calling me with ACRI. That's best taste, toar. Really too potoes over there haven't figuredout. I moved yet. So it's all Bo, I as very tat, Budy speaking of Patty, and we have carring.We have a long list of questions for each night which we're excited to getto, but Um Patty has some very exciting news. You, I believe, have a coverreveal for us for your rand new books, surviving SAVENNA. Can you show it touce and tell us about it? I think Christie's going to pop it on y O, youguys that doesn't look very good wait at Thatso, wt, I and so excited, aseverybody knows like the book, doesn't feel it can feel really private for areally long time. Okar fel really private for a reallylong time. And then, when you get your cover, it's it's this public thing andit feels really really real so really excited. It doesn't come out till March,ninth of O twsand and twenty one, which sounds forever but is actually aroundthe corner. So it is about a ship, the luxury steam Shi Palaski, that theycalled the titanic of the cell, and while she was carrying the elite ofSavannah and Charleston North for the summer, she exploded and she exploded about thirty miles offthe coast of Wilmington North Carolina and three years ago a shipwet companyfound the remains of that ship and all the treasure on it. So that's what this book is about andit's been a lurry of a day. I want to think everyone who shared the cover.It's been Um, there's lot, not a ton of good going on during cobed, and theseare the kind of things that keep us going so thinknow. I'm really excitedit's a beautiful cover and I just want Ta, narrow, Jo and we're going to getto read. What's behind that cover 'cause, that's what I'm nst lookingforward too. Well, it come owt Tar toibut. You know how how they'll bereeder copy, gibbleage and all kinds of stuff. So I can't await it, looksamazing paddy and what a beautiful ver ohmy gosh she brought show and Towl formy Shiprek Book O. I live in Bevernd North Carolina andpeople like really pride themselves as and like living life is a pirate, sothis just makes me feel I'm actually in a hometown today. Sist like makes mefeel I don't even really notice that I'm like Oh yeah, it's just a piratewalking down the street so go no. She you to Christi Nase thinkitsabout you and you're home Ta and IIS merit out the shipwreck book. Yeah YeahI ye hear it Hanni is that is that accurate period costuming is that whatpeople were bearing undeshop, no butbut the pirates who came to get that shipmight happe or the pirates who were looking for the treasure of tes at mymo but fairly okay, tell me about Youre Wee Christin how's it been for you thisweek. Can I first just suggest that big, your coveris all wrong and we need toremake it with Karon and her pirate hat on the onthecstyou're Lotiat a reenside Ando. I do this quite often I'm a...

...it's, not cultural appropriation. I amlegitimately a pirate. I often speak about pirates rights epecially in relation to healthcarelike if you go to the doctor, no matter what you're going to get a pegrigtthey've got to stress their limits and there's onewethere's a one peglimit and don't get me started on vision, you're going to get an eyepatch, no matter what you're going to get an NIEPATCH. So should we lobby forglass eyes and Ha Wa e, so don get get telents? What are the platforms? Well,you know mostly we're about well w're about two things. You know healthcareand birds. Rights Ididn't, like US parody, was on severalships and went down. Has parrody with a D 'cause he's not really a parrot M, soyou know th t, that's really. What we're goingfor is like just bringing attention to the ply to being a pirate. I meanhealth healthcare. Our life expectancy is about thirty years, usually in agallows, I' writor walking the Plagtang the blanket, and you know I'm sure theythrow himburual for free, but you knowthey ha see people don't understand.I so fery likey, I'm sure you come wrong this in your book. I do I do alot about that kind of thing, but I gotto tell you that without Mary andMary here, weare off the rails, andawesome okaywhat was your weaklingbut 'cause. I know you're worried about your kid. Going back to school, right,yeah, Christi W I saw thatwas Forma. I thought I don't have a baby toi thtwas that one night n Nig SchoolLooka Guy, a g Christy. What? What are you thinkingabout that? When does school strirht up there for you? So school actuallystarts on Monday, which is crazy, so we're in Salisbury, which is where Igrew up. North Carolina Not Maryland Um. Just for a few days. I wentn to see mygrandmother today and you know just doing this like fine al rap up beforeschool starts things and Went Nto, my little local bookstore, all masked upand everyone was ma. She was masked up and I was like signing her stock, whichwas kind of fun because it felt I mean it wasn't normal. Obviously- and therewas no one there but the two of us, but it was kind of Nice to like Gosine Buks,and you know like see Yor Book in a bookstore, I mean I was thinkingyesterday. You know normally were all doer and so wewre, seeing our bookseverywhere everywhere everywhere. We really haven't seen them this year, soit's been kind of weird but um but Yeh. So we start Monday. It's a weirdschedule. It's like two half days, no Wednesday two half days and then I kindof like g. They gradually will start back, but you know who knows andthere's we might be all virtual. You know short and short order where I'mI'm preparing myself for that, just inkay. What about you yeah, as some of you guys out there? No,I have a four year old and so he's sort of strange pereod where th werevirtual, isn't an option 'cause he's in Prek, so that's not really a thing forPrek most places, and so we have decided to keep him home,at least at the beginning, I'm in Florida, where the cases are alittle bit higher. I'd. Just like to see the numbers comedown a little bit, you know kind of see what happen so we actually started.Technically school starts a week from Monday, but we started this week withour my my little insane. I can be a preschool teacher lesson plan and youknow what it's really hard like I'm I mean this is not news to anybody.Obviously, but it's Um I iam out of my depth. When he's only four, so I mean IKudos to all of you, teachers out there, because that is a hard job, a yeah Iyeah, I don't know Ho b ooh The hirdest cold, O ars too, and it's Ga I I didn'treally were so lucky 'cause, I mean even when we were doing all of this. Wehad full lesson plans, so it wasn't like. I was trying to figure out. Whatare we learning about today, like yhwas figuring it out, but it's different,but you know that is what it is. So...

...it's going to be such a strangebeginning of the year for everybody that I think, whatever your choice is,whether you stay you go, do half and half whatever. I think we're all kindof ultimately going to be on the same page and kids are so resiliant that Ithink whatever choice, we're making for them and with them m they're goingnobounce back, so I think it'll all be fine, but when a monthwhwhit that outpirates where to j wt, what do pirates do about Elingin a PENDAMAC? Well Imean this is Geaty for US 'cause. It's like fresh for freeding, Um that allthese kids are being raised by depressed et drinkers. You know like sixteen seventeen, butactually I don't like children, though I havesome very good recipes, but on a ship they are fantastic. 'CAUSETHYOU can get three kids like if they're little kids, not like the Huskyones in place of like one pirate, Itore, Wackin out, say y Yourbut, a don't care is for a bookshow, as opposed to a pirate show which we're not going to consider changingdirection 'cause. This is, and I peter watching the live, feed and the wholething is Karen has to join you every week. aifically invaded cepvery childenwer,we ER frend exactly high school caren. Do you want to tell us a littlebit about the silent wife sure it's about five hundred pages Um? It's like one of those crimes from the past haunting thepresent day, which I love, that they call hem like sins of the Father Crime,there's no father in this Um, but I get to bring together my character, JeffreyTolliver, from AH eight years, previous M, and next it'snot eight years, it's more than that, but I get to lie 'cause it's fiction,but he's from my grant county series and he's worked this case and in thepresent day will tran goes to prison. Not for like criminal means he's likethere to investigate he's a cop, and so he gets there and the indmate says: Hey.I didn't do it whut. You know you don't often find inmates going yet dog. Yougot me, I should totally be here, so he was he's a little skeptical, butthen he starts looking into it and he's like holy crap. You may not be guiltyof this crime, and also the COP who put you here is the ex husband of mycurrent girlfriend IAM ensus, there's a lot of sex andviolence. So if you like that Um and you know it's, it was a fun bookto write. I really enjoyed it. I hope people are enjoying reading it, a D if you're- not, I don't want tohear about it, don't put it on Inyou, don't have anything nice to say justdont elter, I don't say it online ecause. I will find out who you are and if you're going to say it online,don't don't tag us, don't I don't Wantt, I doN'tnow you, I don' n know I had tohappen once in an elevator. Were this guyis like at Boucher Kon or something,and he said wow, you got a really bad review. That was like one of the worstreviews, I've ever read and I'm like. Okay, like I'm stuck atan elevator with you dude and you know so I did like the really adult thing Ium I got off and as the doors were close and I was like, of course I I want to hear it don't agme- Don't let me know o o, don't stop me an an elevator to tell me about iteither righ! Well, I'm not going to be an an elevator any time soon. So Im nokidding there you go. That is a silver lining to not being in an elevatorright. There t'Stnono one reminds you...

...of your betterviews Lso caren everynight or everyone'say Nogt of the show we all like to ask a question of ourguest and tonight. Actually, not only do you have the three of US askingquestions, but Maryalis and Mary K have left questions to ask you so Christie.Did you want to start? I believe you had Mary Alice's question. Yes, O thisis for Mary allic. All of us, some friends in fiction support libraries.You, Karen, are a uber supporter. I was so impressed how you were the founderof the Save the Library's project, which has to date raise more than threehundred thousand dollars. Is it do brt Roune the Cab County, ges? Okay, I justThot Tho obut. When I saw it, I was like I'm going to say wrong for theJacad County, Georgia Library Foundation, a quotai culled from you ascharitable citizens. We must invest in our library down the street so that thegeneration serviced by that library grew up to be adults to contribute tonot just their local communities but to the world. What inspired you to beginthe foundation and to be such a force for good? Well, that really sounds like contra tohow ive presented myself tonight, like articulaty professional Um bus in the libraries right I meanwethat's, where we got our start and that's where I got you know DaphneDemorie Patrici, I Smith, going to be honest. I was totally into Incesse loveflowers in the attic not at home, just in my readingum love, em, the sequel toflowers and the attic still with my brother we're going to have children. So you know I, I love the library andan O eigh libraries took the huge yit and I thoughthey lets. Let's do what wecan to raise money for them and I did a Funraizor Mary Ka Andrews was there Iwas like hey you k, ow, you wantto me e at the library, I've got a bottle ofwine and she showed up and I'm like our special guest tonight, and I did the same thing with a brickof heroine, an Cathrine's stock. That was there. So you know we all. We did thisfunraiser, but we realized when you raise money like that, for a library tofundraizer it just pays for itself. I was like well yeit sucks. Why don'twe just give 'em the money? So what we do is we give block grants to.Libraries and authors have been really generous like donating names and y? U NW! It's not like you're asking for ANAMBLA. You know they'rethey're, liketotally there theyre willing to support libraries. We all want to give back Mand you know cr this children who read do better in school. They get betterjobs, they pay higher taxes. That's like a really anybody canunderstand that. I mean it's like such a small amount of money to invest inthe future, and I think that we should be doing that and, as we come out of aPendimi, we should be looking really carefully at what services that we we were going thave to cut some stuff, but we should not just say well, libraries, that'sjust for fun 'cause! It's not 'cause! Kids need libraries so much more nowthan ever, and it's it's all about being the backbone of our educationsystem. And you know babies get like nine months in the womb. They cannoteven grow a full head right, so like they're starting out with a deficit, sowe should give them libraries as a safe place. So their heads can finishgrowing tas, just science we should have. Weshould have quoted that. Instead of the O o Hol Lot, O ncheritable citizen Tathatsgrow their tent to broten. Can I share a story like a an Algonquin roundtable story: Bout luminaters because...

...you're from Salisbury Youre inSalesbury, thet remindin me. So I was at this Um Dinner Party with the dellasMorgan Who's written a great book series of books about the Countess and historical fiction and Celia Emery,who was an amazing actress, Shakespeare, entrained and Sarah Waters, and sowe're all just sitting around talking- and you know I'm like which- which oneof these people doesn't belong here. First Right, so I'm just sitting theretrying to be really quiet and Sara said. So what are you doing tomorrow? 'CAUSE?I was in England on tour and I said I've got to go to Sasbury and she saidsouls bury, and I was like okay, I'm going to thebathroom, and I I stayed in the bathroom for the rest of the party. Well, this is a fun fact aboutSallisbury, sasburry's or sister city, and my dad was mayor for a long time.So therre are bronze plaks and our city hall in Sals Race CityHall, like the both of the Um, the city councils in mayors and stuff Frim, thetwo towns, it's pretty neat, but it's ALS BES BEAUTIFUL! Well, you know what,if Sarah waters ever comes there, you give her a what for so very souberry. I love it. That's Allyeh howD Yo d wan as in it's awesome, Hel Mei a prappy. Let Me Mary candrews left meher question. She said you write some really good, really scary books. Thesilent wife starts out with a brutal Myrtle murder of a nice little coedwith t a hammer true, but sometimes your books have a happy ending. How does that happen? How do you findsuch light in such a dark and dangerous world? First, I'd like to m congratulate Kathyon reading the back of my jacket. She was a special guest in the middleof one of my touring events and she's. Like congratulations on the silentwoman. She was already drunk when she gotthere and she just drank. It was only tenminutes and she just drank like one after the other, so anyway wel so like Yo tatit. Now soI don't know who pre that question for you, but where D to go yeah, you know I think II write allkinds of stories like historical fiction or love stories or Um beach stories. No fence, don't worry,ladies, you know like pieces of her was in abeach town, and so I I think I write all kinds of stories may cause of myname or because of the unflinching way. I look at crime or the proceduralelement of a lot of my books. They just say thrill a rider, but I'm reallyhappy 'cause thrillers sell a lot. I mean if you're going to be in a genree.It's a really good goner to be in like love and death are really big Zellers,especially right now so M, and I love big commercial fiction. I mean I'm notone of these riders with a chip on my shoulder about being in a genre, exceptfor just saying that right now, but I I embraced the title I just Ilove big commercial fission and that's what I try to write and I try to makeit entertaining and appealing to everybody and also, I think, when youwrite about really difficult things. You have to have some balance andlightness, and I really try to accomplish that yeah that that makes sense. Um A andyou know it's interesting- that people sometimes do try to reduce you. If youwrite an INAGENR, I mean I feel like that happens, kind of to all of us tosome extent right and and what's wrong...

...with rating books. That people want toread always thought. That's an amazing, an amazing thing to be able to chew,and you know I've always also thought that if you're getting people readingyou're doing so much good, you know what I mean: Yeah S, th, it's the vaginast stigma,because if it's anything that women are doing well are enjoying, then it mustnot be as legitimate. You know- and I just I we know who our readersare. I mean eighty five percent of all fiction. Buyers are readers. Our readers are women like yes, Oterere just trying to show off. I was like what are the other fifteForno. You know agreeting o. We know who ouraudience is. It's US and I don't think, there's as much of astigma as there was when I first started out: Yesh Igr this kind ofcrime ou were like hey. I really like this.I'm interested in it was like evy a p before it was VN, Wav, yeah, okay cell, so Um. So I have a questionfor you also. I am really interested in your research Um. I would not even begin to know how totackle writing a thriller. I write historical fiction. I do a ton ofresearch for that, but I think it's a completely different thing and I'veread that now you have a reliable network of George of euro ofInvestigation agents, retired cops doctors, people like that who can helpanswer your questions, help you know flush things out for you, but whatabout at the beginning? When you were researching your first novelblindsighted, which you must have written about, I think you said twentyyears ago. What did you do then? And how has that evolved over the years? Well, my aunt when I was growing upactually my stepaunt, but you don't need to know about that. She was thechief of detectives in the town next to ours, and Soi saw just how horrible itis to be a popolice officer, but also a female police officer, because shewould go to work and do this really difficult job, and you know she woulddeal with people who didn't have respect for police officers. But thenshe'd go back to the station and the men there were just as awful. If notmore awful. Well 'cause, you know at least she could arrest the people whowere being shitty to her righ, but these guys were just unusually cruel and you think whatlittle little men that they can't tolerate a woman in their midst doing this job right sothat their stoes threatened that they do these awful things to her m, and sothat was really interesting to me cause. I thought why would you do this job andthe reason why women do this job is 'cause? They love it and also it's one of the few jobs whereyou get one pay perity right, you get paid the same amount as a guys, 'causeyou're doing the same job and two you have freedom right. If you're, if youhave some some autonomy as a police officer- and you know, we give policeofficers a ton of Um Leeway sometimes for good effect, sometimes are bad, butyou know b the nature of the job is they have a tremendous amount of power,and you know there's report after report about how judiciously women usethis power. If you look at, we spend billions of dollars. Settling overuseof force. Lawsuits right and women are around seventeen percent of the forest,but they're less than three percent of these suits. Oh W. If you hired morewomen, just think of the money you would save, I mean thei arrest is thesame. You know, except they go out and they don't do what a lot of men do,which is you know their testosterone ramps up 'cause. They see someone who'sbeing threatening a their response is...

...to be threatening back and women. Awoman's response is just like y w. let's talk, what are you upset about?What are you doing? You know and they get 'em in the back of the car, butthey don't get slap with a lawsuit, so ye that's something that'. That'sreally been strange to me when we're talking about wel one defunding, thepolice, which we've been doing with education for years, and no one'sreally been upset about that m. But you know we should fund them in a more logical statistic. Driven Way and womenare just cheaper. I mean like across the board. Women are generally cheaper,um no offense to Marycay, but you know it. It just seems like we would belooking at these sorts of things when we talk about how to better reform thepolice, and we actually did that in the nineteen seventies. The federal vevernant said: Hey we'regoing to give you a lot of money if you hire more women and Mo more minoritiesand they're like yeah, we'll do it for the money, but we still get to be racesand sexist right and they're, like sure sure, just hire more of em right, whichis why you know Atlanta had was the first African American female chief ofPolice African American female sheriff. I mean it was just like reallyconcentrated 'cause. We had a mayor named Major Jackson, who was like heywhite power structure in Atlanta, we're Gong to get millions of dollars. If wedo this, so let's do this and they're like okay for millions of dollars. Wewill lower our racism and sexism just enough right, so that I mean t a, butthat's the sort of thing you learn from research, and I love incorporating thatkind of research into my books and I do have a network of people. I've got someold retired. I shouldn't call Hem old, like th in their early sixties, that'snot old, especially where I'm sitting but they're retired Georgia, Bureau of Investigation orAtlanta Police Department, women, Um and they've really been they've, beengenerous with their time and told me how they feel 'cause copstingdifferently from normal people, which is by necessity, Um, and I have adoctor who's been with me from the second book. Who G gives me medicaladvice and I try to make Sera's stuff as Authnkic as I can, and you know it'sjust pulling it all together, weaving it into the story. So it's not whenyou're reading it. Oh here's, the research Yoro story, yes e res, youmean just threatening that in and I love historical finction actually isone of my passion reads: I've got the Imadonahu up next and I loved Um EricLarson splinted in the Vil, also the name of his sec tape. Just 'cause. Ilove history. I love everything about it, so I like writing it too yeah. Idid se riting it and reading it. It's en being able to learn when someoneresearches a book very well being able to learn that period of history whileenjoying it is, I think, overly special, the special things to be able to do mChristy. Did you have a question of your own to ask Karen? I do Um and now that you know we'vebeen having this conversation I'. Really. I want to change my questionjust a little bit because I'm really really interested to hear this. Soobviously no. This is just really interesting to me. So you're, obviouslya very prolific writer. You have so many accollades and awards and you wereclearly in the right spot. But if you weren't a writer, what do you think youwould be doing with your life other than being a pirate oe being apiryeah Andioen, honestly, my age I'd be dead rigt. I would ave like a cut and just died orcythlis. So you know I I don't think I would haveamounted to much 'cause. I barely graduated high school Um. I was a smartass. I'm just going to be honest about that shocking. We Tot Amot Abot you cowas Stupidi was literally too smart for my own good, where I was justconstantly getting in trouble M and you...

...know even today. People don't believethat I weirdly that I'm a successful writer like they'll, say I'll, say: Ohyeah, I'm a rior and th. Oh, are you self published or Um like people come like people whoare at my house? I have a nice house. You know I have like jackets framed inmy office from books that have been like number one all over the world andthen you know I'll write something. That's in the Atlanta Journal andthey'll say wel. Did you write that that's pretty good I' like dude? You see these like what do you thing'sgoing on here? So I mean I guess and answer you I'm notvery believable. As a writer, I guess I don't know what I'd be doing. I knowI know one thing I would not be doing 'cause. I remember this very clearlywhen I graduated from High School First, my dad was like who closeon but thenhe's like 'cause I I did go to college. I dropped out which fe goidg to do thatWright a book M, but so you said to me, I'm so proud of you and want you to know you can doanything. You want with your life, but you can never ever move back home and that was like a really a swift kickin the pants causethatte totally derailed. My struggling riter Um, butnot struggling too much plan. So you know I, I had all kinds ofjobs. My sister had a friend who owned a pest control company and I worked forhim for a little while, but it was a drug front and then I painted houseswith an atheminist all women crew. I've never been so sexually harassed. In myentire life like every day, I was just like painting going. Oh my God! Pleasedon't talk to me about butt plugs again and then I um. I worked at a SignCompany and I liked that and I I started a SignCompany and actually I I owned a Sign Company for many years and and Irealized- Oh, my God, every single here I get older, it's notstopping and I wanted to be published by the time I was thirty, and so I soldmy business and I worked for a very good friend of mine who's, a wonderfulman in exchange for being able to be Concentratei more on writing. But ifthat hadn't worked out, I don't know prison the big question. I think we all wereglad it worked out. No kidding R Pattie, I'm sorry Jose oahead obaint.Do you Hav the question? The question that WED love to ask her guests a so wehave this one question Carin that we love to ask everybody and hearing youstart to talk about your dad. I know I've heard you talk about Your Dad,telling scary stories to you and your sister. So I want you to talk aboutthat, but the question we ask everyone which I love is what the values ofreading and writing were in your home growing up 'cause. I want to know howit is for you in the context of writing today. Was the reading and writingimportant to your parents, or was the story telling didn't have like a directimpact than what you do now? This is how my dreading and writing waswere in my home. We were LND. My parents bought the books 'cause, theyhad the bookshelf and they like they. They were just sitting thereand they were the right color wel yeah. My Dad, I mean my dad encouraged mefrom a get go, but it was really weird. I've always been weird, you know, andit was ust ns people h are weird. They don't Wanto, be weird, so they're notlike I'm weird, but you know I'm at...

...that age where I'm like. Okay, damn it.I know I weird and my dad really embraced that and Y.I got in trouble in school a lot like Um, remember when those like baby onboard. Yeah, well, I thought it'd be really funny to make it say: Dead, babyon board and I parked in the parking lot atschool, and that was like my dad had his own parking space up there andthey're. Like you know, Howard he's, like okay I'll be up there Um. I havemy lunchbox here. I taped a picture of Marilyn manroe after the autopsy ontoit. That was ine and I remember like it was that and I'm like I'm making acomment. I'm Beauty Dad and my dad looked at the principal andhe said, look she's weird. We know she's weird and the Shit's going tokeep happening and stop calling me up here for it. You know Thnso that waslike. That was a relief. You know to have itjust out there in the open and have him in my corner, but he wasthe one who said you want to be at the library we'll take you to the libraryhe loves it. He had a really hard life. He grew up dirt, poor, like literallysleeping on the dirt, in a shack that the family squatted in, so that he wasable to have a daughter who was that lazy was sort of a compliment to hishard work, but also he loved my stories. 'cause,I'm the youngest of three girls O my earlier work was about my sisters beingmutilated or being murdered, and I mean they weren't mysteries 'cause. Nobodycared, they were more like you know, happyindings 'cause! I was an only child, so I would write these stories and hewould give me a quarter. Every time I wrote 'em. My detegraphit was squarely above theage of thirty 'cause. My sisters hated Hem, Um n, so I was just encouragedfrom a very young age to write about really brutal things. I have my dad tothink for that. Well, I can sa your Sixtet, like as your dad'still with you as he able to see your success. Oh yes, yes, e, he's, yeahhe's still around alive and kicking a loves. It and you know, he's a greatdad. He had three girls and his mother was in a horrible, abusive relationshipwith my grandfather, who was no longer with us, and we're very happy aboutthat. I mean he was just an awful human being, and so my dad made sure we allunderstood money. Welli Mean W. we've all been selfemployed Um that we all understood how electricity worked andhow plumbing worked and just like a basic knowledge of things, so hewouldn't get ripped off and he made us open up our first banking accounts thatwere in our names, and you know so h that was really important to him and asan author, you know you don't think about that, but you're you're selfemployed, you're running your own business. You gotto keep up with thatstuff, the business into stuff, and you have to Understandin enough so that ifyou're successful enough to have money that you don't lose it 'cause somebodysays hey. I can take care of everything for you. You know so just he gave us areally strong soundation in, like the manly arts that women just generallyweren't haugt when I was growing up and his his mother certainly wasn't taughtthat to be sixth grade. I really interestingdad. That's awesome. An okay don't want to date him, but no, we're gooding he's a good luoking guy. I mean he gevs.He it's a sang, so Um. This is great. I feel like wecould talk about all of these things all night. This is wonderful, but welove Olook who's coming in Oans, showing oh render. I Ti Soask formaiting for Mary cade Agat. Here I just wanted to remind you about foxtailbooks, our bookseller af the week they...

...are offering a ten percent discount onKarens an hour new releases. The link is on the friends and fiction basebookgroup page so order from Foxtail, and you support the author, the bookstoreand the literary community which is a win winwid and you get a discount and asigned book to boot, and who do we have here? Oh Log, it's the silent woman, iiy woman with a crop. They've neverheard me silent before Karen nonow. What I't I o talk about. Did you talkabout Me Ani? Yes, I asked your quat and it Wa it was. It was a really richand deep and profound answer that Carangaze I refuse to answer. Didn'tshe yeah she did well welcome. Welcome back, vary K,Cathy. We are happy to see you. We were actually just about to get to the partof o program where we ask reader questions or of your questions. Peopleout there who were listening and watching so we pulled a few ahead oftime and wi'll also be pulling some from the live beed. So if you have aquestion for Karen Post, it now patty's keeping an eye out for them, butChristi did you want to read a couple of the ones that we pulled ahead oftime? Yes, absolutely so the first one is from Rose Doloch and she said thatin the book you state every year, there are over three hundred thousandreported cases of missing girls and women, and this is obviously a horrificfact, and she just wanted you to illuminate that a little bit. Well, you know, fortunately, a lot ofem come back and that's also unfortunate in a waybecause it cews that statistic in a way that a lot of police officers take asit and waight approach, especially when it's a a young girl or a woman ofColor Um. You know so it it it's something that can work against us inways, and you know you understand, when over and half of 'em are going toreturn or be found, or you know, stranger abductions are very rare, butI I you would think they'd be on more of a war footing and that's actuallykind of a pet peeve of mine. Lately, it's like okay. Well, we got thatstatistic. We get the fact that every year, almost a quarter of a millionwomen report being raped right and that's just who reports that that'seighteen and over and that's just what the FB I keeps as far as statistics,because you know most police forces are rer, really small and they don't reporta lot of their statistics act accurately and a lot of police forcesare like Nassyou Ann raped, we're not even going to investigate that we'renot going to file a report. You know so we as a society. We just accept acertain level of violence against women where there's domestic violence, sexualSA harassment. You know some of US specially cathy,well cathy you're, almost over that humt right because from the age of like eighteen until you're about jonty likeme. Well fifty forty or fifty one of the main reasons likestatistically that you could die is going to be homicide, Baright, usuallyfrom an intimate partner and you're, more likely to be a victimof rape, and so that statistic dies down until you get into the cashy years.And then it like shoots back up. So I'm like in the sweet spot right now, I'mnearing that sweet spot between rape and murder- and you know, but that'sjust what we live with Lkeoh, it happens. What are you going to do? Youknow we get. We get airplanes hitting towers whichwor that was awful andcoarse, shocking, a D and so such a profound loss of life, but the numberof lives lost and then subsequently, with the wars. That's not even close tothe number of women that are killed by intimate partners just in like the lastfive years are abused her and we're...

...like. What are you going to do ye? Wehave a war on drugs, but we don't have a war on violence against women andpart of that is 'cause a lot of men who are in charge. It works great for 'em.You know, N, you look at some of these guys. They grew up during Jim Crow. Whywould they want to change anything? It works great. I mean if I was part ofthe Patrior 'd be like Screo bishes. You know this is great you're, notgetting any of this but ow. You look at the th, the copdown in Saint SimonsGright, who h the police basically covered up for him. He had threatened his a stranged, wifeand her boyfriend and the judge didn't take it seriously and the Coptidnt take it seriouslyuntil he went out and killed his wife and her boyfriend and then himself Yehafter the cops after the cops chased him. But you know, forty percent of allpolice officers have had a charge of domestic violence against them and,let's say, okay Twentylis. Let's just have it. Let's say: HALF OF EM arelying, which isn't even statistically possible, that's twenty percent andthey have badges. I mean. Why are we? Why do we live with this? We're fiftyone percent of the population? Why are we living with it? I've nown I've knownsome really good, cops and they've helped me a lot with research over theyears, and it's certainly not everybody. But when you put people in power thathave their own issues rbut, you know that's the thing Kathy is Kinda likesaying not all men Rit. We know that it's like we're, starting at a basline,that this is not everybody, I think and and and not to like jump on you aboutit and I feel really bad 'cause. This is your show, even though you bailed onme, but whatever o know, but yeah. Of course, there are good cops ethee. Ofcourse there are. But what are we doing to stop the bad copscourse? They aregood men, but hey good men. Stop these guys from raping and killing US just stand up to it. Patty did you want to pull one quickquestion from the life quite doven, Ili Wape. I know right n a Yoyou knew e, just speaking th. If this is sogreat because ever every Wednesday we have something totally different, andthis is totally different. I love it Itoin. I straight I mean I'm sgrown through the livequestions and ninety percent of them are about how much fun you are and wellyou have a drink with them in Atlanta aparts, for my college roommate, thenwe've got Um. There's lots of people wanting to know,what's going to happen to your characters. Next, so we're not going tolet you answer that, but one thing I think is really interesting and youkind of hit on it when wewere talking earlier about what we would do if wewerent writing and it's m. What would you tell your younger writ yourself today when you first started? Writing what would you tell your younger rityourself today, you will get more contracts. That's a big worry right when you firststart out. It's like. I had a three book deal, so I didn't start sweatingtil, the second one, and then I just worried and worried and worried andworried and like and knowing that you're going to have more publicationcontracts gives you a freedom as a writer, because people don't thinkabout. We do this. We love doing this and in Kathy's Um position she wrotefor years we go very little pay a place called the Atlanta Journal. So she knows I mean we're not doing itfor the big bucks, but we do have mortgages and things so taking thatworry out of the equation. I think let you write more freely and Y W, there's so much to worry about.When you write a book about pleasing people. You know, I don't think aboutmy readers when I'm writing.

I am aware in a way 'cause. I remember what it felt likewhen I first was a college student for t that very brief time m. You know andI was poor and I would save up to buy a hardcover book for my favorite author M,an I read it and so I've I've I've spent so many hours working 'cause. Imade like four dollars an hour and then you know I had to work those hours andthen I spent my precious time reading this book and if the author just kindof puned it in my what the hell man you know this is my life you're messingwith and I love your work, and so I never want anybody to feel like I'mjust phonid it in. I got to do something different each time and Ihave to feel proud about what I'm doing 'cause I it is a craft and I want toget better with each book and I want each book to be more difficult to write'cause. That's where you learn, how to be a writer so, but taking that stressout im I'm going to get another contract or you know, am I goin ta beable to feed my cats. That sort of thing I is very meaningful, so I wouldsay to my youngerself, you know: M Yeah, you'll get at least you'll have atleast twenty books and you're going to be okay, yeah. Someone just asked I got. I gotta tellthis one. Michelle Markis just asked our Cathy, our Mery cindres and Karenreally good friends, because Karen's really teasing her ane Wan. I Le Me-and I known you Cathy, like three thousand years. I some feels like it tome and we close. We live geographically. We don't live far apart, but you now weever see each other riders have very isolated lives to it's like when wecome out of our caves. We did come out of our caves back before the Pandimicright hare and we M for drink some munch with a couple of their localriter. All that's right. who was that s Ann Yeah? I was with Joclin and Um LynCollin and um his invisent rebeccawaiy and Susan Rebecca White Yeah we'v met at Leons and it was. It wasreally good fun, but you know it. I love the idea that we'reall going to manuals, which is the rider hangout in Atlanta. I love theidea that we're all going to go in to manuals hey're going to sit in the backroom and toss back some cold ones and talk about craft, but the reality iswe're going right back into our case strue. Speaking of the writing cave T at, weare getting very close to running out of time, but we just wanted to ask youquickly. Do you have very writing tip Um for our listeners out there? Wealways like to give kind of a quick writing tip that they can take home andand use just the tip SA. You know it. It seems, like I'm Bein kind of anAsshole, but maybe I am Yo, but just do it right. You know we allhave this. This a reader come up and say I got a great idea for a book. Youwrite it and we'll split the profits and it's like Um. You know the idea's.Actually, not the hard part really is everybody like everybody has at least one idea for abook or like the opening of a book or whatever, and it's figuring out how tot express it through a story line and how to Hangi on characters, people careabout and how the plot's GOINGTA fit together and if you're writing athriller, how the mysterexs are going to work, and you know it's, you have toreally sit down and write it, and that is the hard part right. It'slike you know. I I'll talk about Sarah waters. Again, 'cause, I mean she's,actually a friend of mine, except for rudely correcting me at a dinner party,but she told me everybody always asked...

...where I get my ideas and I just stealedhim. I'm allowed to say that D, I'm, like I'm, going to tell everybody. Yousaid that and I have but it it really is not the idea I mean, if you think,about crime and punishment, I mean slip, O freaking piece of bread, ChinatownWater writs. Who cares you know it's just it's the characters in the storyand how you fit it all together, and that is the work of being a writer andif you want to be a published writer or if, if you wouldn't just be a reallygood writer, sit down and figure out how to do it, that is just the t it such 'such goodit. Thank you. Christy didyou want to tell us a little bit about the newsletter which we announced lastweek? Yes, I'm so la sorry and the Hopko Misreig. I forgot that thosestill happen. Lastweek we announced our newsletterand the response was Penogminal Aso. If you want to subscribe, our sign up ison our friends, infiction basebont page and also our website, which is www,tfrns, ifiction, otcom Um. It's just one more way for us to connect with you.It's filled with Thi Special Qand, a with our guest of the weak, our noticeof events and this sweet spilight is on Mary Allis and rose. So those of viewswho had already subscribed definitely got a treat great, and I also wanted to just giveyou all. Avemind ordboat club is meeting for the second time the friendsin Fiction Official Book Club is meeting for the second time this Mondaynight last month. They got to talk about Hello Summer by America, Andrewsand this month, they're going to be talking about the book of Lost Names,my book, so I will be joining them Monday night at seven o'clock on thefriends infiction official Book Club Page, will save spoilers until the end'cause. I know some of you still have not been able to find the book, I'm sosorry about that. It's hopefully, gointo be back an stock really sooneverywhere, very hopefully, but um join us there and and we'll talk about thebook I'll. Take your questions, Brenda and micallar doing a great job overthere d make sure to join that book club and we'll put that link up on thefriends in fiction. Official e Friendsi fiction face o group page.So that is our program for tonight. It always goes by so fast. I thought youknow with Yeuwere of us here we were going to have so much space to fill,but I feel like we could talk for three more hours and we wouldn't be done sothis was so good and Karen, thank you. So much forrinning US tonight and again,congratulations on your new novel and Hitting The New York Times list rightout of the gate at such a high spot. A's, wonderful, we're so happy for youand to all of you who are joining us tonight. Remember if you ever miss anepisode, you can catch it on our website, friends in fiction com. Ispeak for all of us when I say we are delighted that you choose to spend yourWednesday nights with us or, if you're watching later we're thrill that you'vecome back and found us. So please join us in the friends ind fiction, fasebookgroup page and meet us back here on friends in fiction next week, when ourguests will be our dear friend, Christina mcmorris. Thanks again, Karenand goodnight everybody Ain' thing e car in by Caren. I know where you live: WH, isn't that around wel hat as amazing,she's hiarious Kathy, missed em, the beginning, where Patty was doingher cover revel and Karen top back opene a pirate at scrit. That soundslike her s sor. She had a name on her screen ofKDOG and during that she changed into Kate Darg. All that not is hilarious. Idon't even how to change the name on my thone either she she go PA. I didn't get to ask her. I got her itsto granpost today, no in in Christy. I didn't give you a chance to talk abouta dad Yo novel either I apologiteor Oand a DA dont o Postt n ages, so we'lltalk about it next week, O Sgrficherte...

Okaygo, Karen's INS togram today. Nowthat you'll know her he'll find it even funnier SAS. It says I have a bumpersticker that says honk if you think I'm sexy het. I just sit at green lightsuntil I feel better about myself, th IA, not amazing. She was a trip. Shewas awesome, Yehbtes Lotif for Mary alic missing out of nuttonight. That was too Badoh and I just love hearing um about her familygrowing up. You think somebody who's a hundred and twenty countries and fourhundred to fifty billion languages- and you know number one best sellers wouldbe like. Yes, I grew up in a house with the Libraryof S. Yeh, not what happens. Do you know what's sointeresting, though, and I'm Gon I'm going to just Badger the statistic 'cause, I don'tremember it completely, but I saw it you know like on the wall of ebookstore bathroom or something, but it was tha statistic about the number ofbugs that you have in your home. Um is directly related to your child'sreading level and it wasn't even like how many I pick up and read to them,Mabe, which I guess would be proportional because, presumably, butshe said she had a lot of books in her house. Yes, she di necessarily beingread, and I thought that was so interesting because y. u I read that Ithought that's so strange and they were like you know, just havinp having thebooks in your house, hoster told Herbe, better readers, so he gies, reallyKinda cool wow is interesting about the background she talked about, though, isUm she's been so prolific and obviously does a lot of research and she's justreally good at what she does, but so some families, maybe instill in theirkids. A love of reading or teacher love. Em reading sounds like her familytaught hard work and invaluming hard work and valuing you know like thosethose things that those are essential components of making a writer too, and it's interesting because we don'toften hear it, especially since we're asking that question what what wereyour family's values aboutabout reading and around reading that there's so muchmore. That goes into what makes an author isn't Therin. I think well,inheens, if you come from a working class family, I mean from a workingclass family. My parents were white collar, but they were not collegeeducated and it was like you work. You get a job you maybe set until you cando something else. My mother got inmy first job as a cashier at the amp andbasically told the manager you're going to hire her yeah, and you know every every summer, when Igot home from college, I had a job and my parents were like you have to savefive hundred dollars over the summer or you're, not going back yet syll. Myfirst job was at Wendy's in the drive throuh soyeahbut Tik, a junior Garfe, delicious Somthin, a a I put, an extraFrench fries in my friends bags, but often I just thought what was superinteresting also was how much her father honored her. In her words, herweirdness not ran careered but like he didn't try to fix it. He just gon on itand I asked meazing. It gives her such I'm sure, that's ahuge component of giving her the individual voice that she has. Today Imean if you grow up with someone who tells you you have to conform, you haveto conform. You know there's a chance that eventually you're going to confor,but if she grew up with someone who just said B ou and that's okay, youknow, and what a gift to the world now look at all the books, an hes writtenbetter, because she's heard you know well as back ti like five minutes ago.But I think if you look at something that five of Ise haveing common, we allwork really hard lake. We weare never expecting that. We're going to write abok and it's just Fli at in the world, it's going to sell a bunch of copies,and I for sure that's something that was always installed in me, and it wasyou know, except for the job, except for this morning. excepter this morning,Weny Wellan iar having coffee was manded with you, then swer Forgottto I just I had all these excuses. Finally got my Knowledgeman, yourinvisible dog chewed, the cord to the...

...computer, and I was like next you're going to buindit on your dog and I was like Lo, don't have one, but I'm not going to tell youall that was Sou at was I way I was I'm glad I gott verylast. I'm glad you Hav to popbakeleptic yeah me too, especially because of thefriendship you to share, but you'll have to watch it later. It was I I lovehowevery. U, no! What I love how every week Um we just pivot to somethingslightly different and that was Mucha to se a o. It was diffrent o adifferent voce for us and I loved it MIS grape. She was bet iappy shed.Merycase Shou talked about you a lot. You were on the show without being onthe shot. It way I know, Jackerin are O. I have qut meDowr to I'm going to go. Um have dinner, but yes, I will see youall at proximately six, forty five, unless Christie has some other lameexcuse, I mean I know I know Shu start making a list of Christie'slame excuses and like find the Mott Aclik torrow and, like I have to leaveat seven, am to drive to a book event. I know I know it's such a bad excuse,but it could do what poty does and get up an extra hour early sometat I willNevero will never happen. I had to GEV on a clean or a car. I I am happy as a clan to write atmidnight O to make up for it, but not II. You just see you amid my girlfriendFeyouan Manight, I at him at eleven forty tive tomorrownight and I will write it then, and I was iall of you tonight, all migh hat everybody, Iknowwash laugter, goodnight, you've been listening to the friendsand fiction, poncast, be sure to subscribe to the friends and fictionpodcast wherever you LISEM and if you're enjoying it leave a review. Youcan find the friends and fiction authors, ant, www, dot, friends andsiction doth come as well as on the facebookgroup page friends. An fictioncome back soon. Okay, there are still lots of books, writing tips, interviews,publishing, EWS and bookstores to chat about goodbye.

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