Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode 10 · 1 year ago

Friends and Fiction with Sister Hazel's Ken and Drew

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ken and Drew from Sister Hazel join the Fab Five to celebrate the launch of Kristin Harmel's THE BOOK OF LOST NAMES--and perform ALL FOR YOU live for the Friends & Fiction viewers! https://www.sisterhazel.com

Welcome to friends and fiction. Five best selling authors endless stories. Friends and fiction is a podcast with five best selling novelists whose common love of reading writing in independent bookstores bound them together. With chats, author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing, these friends discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Best Selling Novelists Mary K Andrews, Christen Harmel, Christie Woodson Harvey, Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Monroe are five longtime friends with more than eighty published books to their credit. At the start of the pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour to talk about their books, your favorite book stores, writing, reading and publishing in this new, unchartered territory. They're still talking and they've added fascinating discussions with other best selling novelists. So joined them live on their friends and fiction facebook group page every Wednesday at seven P M Eastern, or listen in view later at your leisure. Hi everyone and welcome to friends and fiction. Are Weekly facebook live show featuring author chat in support if independent bookstores. Our Community of readers here on friends and fiction has grown to more than thirteen and a half thousand members and we could not be more thrilled to welcome you here tonight. So let's get started. I'm Christin Harmel and my latest is the book of lost names, which just came out yesterday. I'm Christy waits in Harvey and my latest just feels like falling and I just wanted to say huge congratulations Christen. One of my favorite books of the year. If you have not ordered the book of lost names, you're missing out. Do it right now. Okay, stop, go on. Thank you looking for our book. I'm kind ally and Henry and my latest is becoming a Mrs Lewis, and I'm just going to say ditto after Kristen and Christie, because this is celebration week for Kristen's new book and it is a powerful book and we're so excited. I've been mowing realist than go and my recent novel is on Ocean Boulevard and today we're celebrating the book of lost names. So exciting. And I'm Mary Kay Andrews. My latest book is called Hello Summer, and I just want to echo what what everybody else is that we're so excited for Kristen and the Book of lost names this week and we can't wait for you to see our exciting guests tonight. Your checks are in the mail. I say I didn't know. They're all going to say that. Thank you. That was so nice. So everyone, welcome to friends and fiction. We're so glad you're here. So tonight, as you might have noticed, is a very special night for us. This is the very first time we've had a musical guest, and it just so happens to be Ken Block and Drew Copeland, two of the members of my very favorite band for twenty years now, sister Hazel, more than twenty years, my Gosh, who I have loved since the summer of one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven, which was right around the time they had their first major hit song, the chart topping all for you, which is basically the anthem of the late s. They quickly followed that up with singles like happy, change your mind, champagne high and many more, and now they've switched things up a little and have had, for backtoback billboard top country album chart entries. They routine me sell out their tours. They are followed by an amazing group of fans who called themselves the Hazel nuts. So hello to all the hazel nuts out there tonight. have their own annual cruise called the rock boat, which I have been inebriated on several times. They have their own pediatric cancer charity called lyrics for life, and they continue making music that just keeps getting better and better. It is one of the reasons we've been really looking forward to having them on. They ultimately do the same thing we do. They tell stories that move people, and we are so excited to talk to them tonight about storytelling and song. So please, everyone joined me in welcoming Ken Block and Jukt Copeland from the platinum selling band sister Hazel, who tears. Thank you for coming. So it's Thomas. I'm going to stop talking in a second and let them talk. But before we get rolling everyone, I want to remind you that every week we featured an independent bookseller and this week we're working with writer's block and Winter Park Florida. You can head over to our friends and fiction facebook group page to find a link to writers block. They are offering ten percent off all our new releases with the code friends fiction, and that includes autograph copies of the Book of last names as where as well as Mary Alice's recent rerelease of the Book Club. So, because we love sister Hazel and because we love all of you, twenty of you who buy any of our new books now through Saturday using that coupon code will win one of sister Hazel's recent EP's earth, wind, fire or water, which together make...

...up elements which we are going to be talking about shortly. And of course, you can find out more about sister Hazel and order their music and merged at sister hazelcom. So I'm done battling. Welcome you, guys, and can you tell us to since this whole shutdown started, this has been bit surreal for all of us. Adn't yeah, US, you know, most people in life crave adventure. He being on the road, you know, back and forth, back and forth for decades. We've always kind of crave consistency, and so this has been the first time in our whole career. Yeah, we've kind of been able to get up at the same time, you know, kind of map out your days a little bit. So that's it's been really cool, but of course there's so many unknowns and when it's touring, ever going to come back, and so trying to figure out the best way to maximize our time and create content, create new songs and keep everybody engage. That's that's our tasks of the day. What's we're going to be talking a little bit about some of the amazing things you guys have been doing during this time. I'm so excited to dig into that. But you know, when we have guests on our show, we love to ask you questions and each of us likes to ask one. So I was hoping tonight maybe Mary cake could lead us off, because she had a great one about songwriting. Okay, you know, I am so not musical, but the thing I always wonder about songs that really move me, as yours do, is what comes first, the melody or the lyric? Are you do you do what we do? You're writing in the car and you're like, Oh my God, that's that's a thing, that's a story, that's a that's a melody, or do you have lyrics and you save them up for when the music, for when the right melody comes to you? So I'm always. I've always wondered about that. Is there a first or does it change from time to time? You know that's that's a question that as songwriters we get asked out a lot because people are curious that, especially people that haven't, you know, experimented and tried it. But the truth is it comes all different ways. Exactly like what you were saying. There can be times when you have a subject matter that you want to discuss and so you sit down and start from that. You have either something that you want to say or a story that you want to tell. You can do it that way. A lot of times in collaboration, depending on who you're writing with it, there could be a chord change that somebody comes in with and then you start from there. So it takes a lot of different forms. I think a lot of times, when we were write on our own, we're normally inspired by something, trigger something and and that starts the process. When you're writing alone, and and I know I can't speak for you because I've ever written with you when we're writing alone, but for me it'll what you said about being in a car. That happens to me a lot. I'll be driving down the road and I'll come up with a melody idea and I'll think what, where do I know that from? And if I realize it's not a song I know, then I go home and I try to write it. And sometimes those songs come really fast. Like, I think there was a song that I wrote called Strange Cup of tea and I was actually driving around on the campus of the University of Florida and then the whole yeah, Goo gators now and the the whole chorus came to me just drive. I was at a stop sign almost and I almost sang the entire course. And so when I got home, Wow, I grabbed my guitar and started writing it and with it. Honestly, within thirty forty five minutes I had written probably ninety five percent of the song. So they all come in different ways. I know, I know the champage had high was one that was well, different type of maybe think of. That was what I thought of when you were saying that is on that same record. I was out driving stuff to the dump out toward newberry and and on the way home I saw a crooked chimney standing in the middle of a field and I thought that's a great line cricket chimney staying in the field, which became the first line of this song. Just remember and as I was looking at it I thought, wow, there was a whole house around there and a whole family that had a life in there where they had kids, and that kid or not a walk and that you know what I mean. And then it had been forgotten, and so the whole story kind of popped in my head on the way home from the dump, but seeing that chimney in the middle of a field. But the truth is that that was always just a chimney there. There was never a really a house. It's just a Jimmy mind of styrofirm chimney. I love it. Oh my God, there's are both such great songs. How cool to hear the story behind them. Mary Alice, did you the question for Kenning Jo? I do. First of all, I love elements,...

...your new album. Thanks. I own it. I was listening to it all day. I'm just really love it and it's a pretty impressive collection of songs. I was really impressed also that you're you producing under the independent label croaking poets, which I think is a really cool name and needs to my question. Okay, in two thousand and sixteen when John Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in literature. Do you remember that huge debate that was inspired by that? Is is learning our lyrics poetry. So I figure you, with your name, croaken poets, you have to have an opinion on whether lyrics are indeed poetry or do they share elements of poetry? Well, they share elements of poetry. In my opinion. I think that I don't I am not as as well versed in the tip of poetry to be able to say that that's all it is. But there are certainly elements of it. But it's a poetry that has to fit into a meter, it has to fit into a puzzle that we're trying to build with all these different elements now put and intended. Generally speaking, songs are literary. Now, not all songs are literary. I mean I would say even between us there's some that are just they're just fun songs or just things, but there are some fit are bits of their stories there, there their whole pieces. But yeah, you know, that was an interesting thing when when that question came up. I believe it is literary, but what I do, compared to what you guys do. It's a different art. This is I'll say on elements. Jet Are, our Bass player, challenged us to write a complete one minute song and I thought, can I write a complete idea in one minute? So I kind of did it, because I want you to write one for each record or anybody, and then we're going to make them connect so that by the last one it becomes one piece. Now really just a let's get unstuck do something a little bit differently. But it's not easy to get a whole idea in one thing. It's still left open ended enough where can get picked up and then the same thing and then the same thing. So with songs we have a certain amount of time, certain amount that we got to get rid of superfluous stuff. I can't believe you could do anything in a short period. I know it's that is not my forte ha, ha ha. I'm not my for say. I but, but, but when I was, when I was younger, a young songwriter, I found a bunch of screenplays that my grandfather had written that I had never met. I'd never met him, but what I've read them and I thought I never knew anything that long and I thought wow, he's time page to page thirty seven and and what's going on here is time, and I thought what a mind you have to have, even, you know, if it wasn't prize winning, it was beautiful and it was amazing and it wasn't something that I see myself being able to do. But so it's different the way you guys kind of write that. So we're we have to write a little bit more succinctly to get those same feelings in a complete one of the things that struck me too, and I was listening to your music today, there's such a rhythm, then there's a rhythm a beat to poetry, and there's a rhythm and a beat to your music, you know. So I think definitely it's poetry. I really well. I will tell you this from for me, if you asked me to write a poem versus writing a song, a poem seems a lot more intimidating for me. I don't know why, but to ask me, and it's funny because I could probably go find some lyrics that I've written and maybe it looks like a poem if I just read it. But if someone said, hey, have you ever thought writing a poem? I'd be like, I can't, that's scary, that's scary. I can't do that. Can Write Song? Yeah, and I did do write. If you listen to your lyrics, it's a poem. Some of those lyrics are absolutely I like the way you think. Hey too, and here what we do. There are there are people who are me music people and they're people who are lyric people and they both get moved equally in different ways. But I have friends that go, you know, years after here and record. I didn't know you were saying that. You know, and I'm like, you know, they say you look well and I don't know. And I will say I was writing what I was writing a song with a guy that will remain nameless, but you probably know who it is. But I was writing...

...a song with this guy one time and he wrote this line and it made no sense to me, but I thought it did to him and I said, man, that's a great line. What does it mean? And he goes, I don't know, it just sounded cool. Yeah, and we know what means. So it's amazing. Yes later. Yeah, I had a really great story behind it. Yeah, just like I have a good answer. That's all that matters. Exactly. You guys mentioned elements and how how the you mentioned a little bit about how they link together. Can you tell us a little bit about the creation of that project, especially in regard to what you did with the four eps that led up to it? Well, I'll start. I'll start with the piece and then he can kind of follow up. That way I don't talk too long. It was really the idea at first was look, guys, the landscape of music is changing and way people are ingesting music. They are they're buying singles, they're buying smaller amounts of music, and if we can do that, we could do more. I can EPE, we could come out with music more frequently, we can come out with it with it won't be these big APPS, but from record to record, like record tour right, record record, we just can keep coming in, precord song at track or two and keep things moving. And then it was jet right. What did he say? He was like, yeah, well, we were. We were looking for a way to do this and then have have kind of a common thread go through multiple albums and we had done a lot of things with numbers. We talked about a number scheme that might make sense or just you know, different ways to make it happen. And as honestly, I think it was as we were sifting through some songs, we started to see a couple of things that made sense in elements. Why wise there was there was a line in one of the songs that said come on in the waters. Fine, and and so we were like okay. So we started going through those things and that's when he came up with the elements idea and we were sold right away. And then it was really cool. Also, and I know this isn't quite as interesting, but the the guy that did the artwork for the album's he came up with such cool graphic design for the albums. Yeah, we were we really like the way all that turned out and as he started sketching them, we're like they're cool, this is the right way to go. So, yeah, that's great. Oneter, that's awesome, and so I think, Patty, you had a question. Well, I want to I'm just kind of laughing because when you said that the he said, I don't know what that sentence means. You know, just sounds good. I'm trying to imagine any of the five of US telling our editor that right, just keep it in this still the line? We haven't it means, but I like the way it sounded. So I haven't listened country music all of my life, since I had to listen on the radio and make mixtapes for my friends. You tried to record it and then the raiding and the DJ talks over the end of the song and I love your music and I know there's been kind of a perceived shift with y'all from southern Acoustic to country music. And I live in Birmingham and you know, muscle shoals is, you know, part of the whole genre music around our area and I read that your lead guitarist, Ryan Newell said, and I'm going to read it so screwed up. I don't think we made a conscious shift. Everything we've done still has a sister Hazel sound. The main difference is that we started writing with writers in Nashville and we record our albums there and you can't help but be influenced. We're still being true to ourselves, but the format we were lumped into for years has disappeared. If you listen to country music nowadays, it's what was on rock radio years ago. Absolutely, I know we all change with our art lins a liar. I know we all change with our and there you know it feels faith to be changed. But was it something you notice well it was happening, or was it more hindsight as you looked at how you had transformed by saying true, New Music was I'll tell you that if you go back, and you know Ken mentioned, just remember if you get back and listen to our early albums and you put them side by side, to two elements and even ladder in the dark and some of the albums before that heartland highway release, all those albums, there's the same thread kind of going through all of it. It sounds it there. It's very similar. In fact, I would say our early albums might have even been more country than the stuff we're doing now. There might be a couple of instrumentation things that make people think it leans that way more and and honestly, some of the songs that I've written I do tend to gravitate that way, but a lot of the times it's not contrived it, it's it's what the song is calling for.

So we've never really gone in and said Hey, let's write this country song. We've just gone in and tried to write a good song, serve the song and then serve the song. If it calls for a steel guitar because that's the sound that is going to create the emotion that you want, then that's what you put on it. And we've been really fortunate to be surrounded by a lot of great writers as well. We've collaborated with some of the best writers in Nashville and then producers and additional musicians we've had. You know, we kind of opened our doors a little bit, which we didn't do for a long time in this band. But we open the doors to collaboration with outside riders and to have, you know, some guest musicians come in and and some guys come and sing on stuff. You know, we had Darius Rucker came in and sang on a song that he and I co wrote together and you know he can sing pretty good. So we were like, I don't think it's okay. Yeah, I'M A boy. You know, radio is so different. There's satellite radio and streaming services now and all that stuff, but you know, rock has narrow that lane is narrowed. Menacelee alternative rocks, other Rock, pop, rock, Nara country kind of widened and pulled in a lot of different things. So we had always blurred that line between those different genres a little bit. So, you know, we let other people call it whatever they want. He's trying to make records that we're really proud of. Yeah, and I would say back to Ryan's comment that if you put on one of the Old Eagles Eagles records or an old Tom Petty record it today, if that, if that music came out today, it'd go on country radio. That's where mine great and maybe you come out. Yeah, there's no other. There's no others would probably play it. It's been amazing to the the way that your sound has stayed, in a way, consistent, but you just evolved so much. I mean it's someone who's been following you guys for literally since one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. I mean it's but I'm actually outside your house right now. Is that we are? This is just my fake zoom background. I'm really outside that. That's not odd to say. No, but I mean you've your your core has stayed the same in such a beautiful way, but you've just evolved as storytellers and his songwriters, and I mean as a writer myself and I don't presume to think I know anything about writing songs, but I've just been so impressed by what has happened to you lyrically with every every album. I mean you just get better and better. It's so impressive and the hazelnuts show up for everyone. It's amazing. So yeah, you guys are the best. Christie, I think that. You know, few things have helped us. You know, there's ad and I have a thing with our voice right, the harmonies, your nuts. That's Ryan has a signature sound with his guitar. That rhythm section creates an energy that's recognizable. So we all get gave. Now you getting together behind our instruments, we make a noise. It's our thing to print. You know, here's that guy with the nasally voice from Gainesville. You know, it's recognizable and over the years, you know, I wrote the majority of songs early, drew started writing a lot after that and over the years everyone's begun grown into a great writer, in my opinion, and that is helped us evolve so that it's coming from all different areas and when he brings using a song, I bring in a song. We don't go here's the song. You play this, he played in a song and go this is what it is. I want you to feel ownership on this. So what do you got? You know, and that took time to develop that kind of trust between us, because first you come in, in her for me anyway, come in, I'm like, here's the song and I want you to play like this, and I'm when he played this exact thing and I have it in my head a certain way. And then then we was like that's not what I wanted to be in a band for. And you give it up a little bit and you see rust. It's trust, yeah, and it doesn't come night, but it's beautiful when it happens and then you go oh man, I wouldn't have done that, but I'm really glad we did. And so having everyone be writers and giving everyone the opportunity to have input is a big piece. Hey, I have I know that it's your show and not ours, but I have a question for you guys. Can I ask a question? Yeah, yeah, that's a writer. have any of you taken an extended period of time off from writing and then when you went back to sit down to write, were you scared? Was it as I have you ever experienced that to where you took such a time period off that when it was like me, I need to sit down and ride again. Asking for a friend. I'm asking for a friend. I'm not saying I'm frightened, I'm just saying I'm...

...a little scared. I haven't written. I mean, I'll be honest, and this is this is I know of the people are watching this and it's not just the the small group of people. I just haven't written in such a long time and I need to sit down and write and I'm like, dude, I don't even remember how to write a song, like I don't even know where to start, and so I just wondered if anybody, if you guys are better. I think it's a start of the pandemic. I was so freaked out and so stressed and so many emotions. I knew I have a book. I write a book a year, so I knew I had a book do in October, but I just I couldn't make myself do it. I and I was intimidated by it. But I think all of us will tell you every time we sit down to write, I have to overcome tremendous fear and self loathing and am puff all the things. But yeah, after an extended period, I think the longer you wait the harder it gets. I know it stopped strong parting and finishing, like yeah, when you take the paint brush off the fainting say it's much back. And for true, the middle, when you're working through there, you know you got your head down kind of doing it. But that that anxiety of yet started and then going. Because right now we've had like three conference calls with the band about turning in songs and I'm like Yo, got a bunch, but I'm I'm scared. I've been scared for twenty five years my songs when they're written. Yeah, just I just turn off the camera. When they start talking about writing, I'm like no, I will think, I sn't want to know. Yes, no, it's just going to say we write every morning, and I mean so. I literally worked on my new book this morning. So this afternoon I'm like reading through my book was coming out next year for the final time and I'm reading it and I'm like I can never do this, like how did I do this? I can never do this again. I had written four hours earlier, but I was like, Oh, I'll never be able to do this. Okay, so I'm gonna never goes away. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it just means you're doing it right with your creams in. This was good. Let's just keep this between us, okay. Yeah, yeah, Ye, tell our thousands of viewers that. Yeah, exactly, Christine, Christie, you would, but we're you would have push it also. Yes, so, when we got together and decided to do this friends and fiction show, one of our main reasons for getting together is that we wanted to help. You know, is during a pandemic and we thought, you know, why can we do besides entertaining people and making them have a good time like tonight? You know, how can we help? And we knew our independent booksellers were struggling, and so we thought, if we can get together and we can help them, you know, we'll be doing something good, and you guys are really known for, you know, supporting other people who are doing good and are really dedicated to doing good yourself. So I was going to see if you could tell me just a little bit about the heartbeat, which is your amazing new youtube show, and about your Pediatric Cancer Foundation, lyrics for life. It seems like you're really helping highlight the good things and changing the world to the better with both projects. That's very kind. Thank you and and I will tell you that I feel really fortunate personally that all of the guys in the band it has always been instinct. It's never been forced. It's been something that we all feel very blessed and what we get to do for a living, and if there's a way that we can help a worthy cause by either playing a song or showing up in an event or whatever we can do to try to help that cause, we've always felt a call to do that and I'm proud of that. The the show that we created, we got so tired of everything being so toxic and there's always such a tension drawn to any celebrity when they do something wrong, when an athlete, you know, goes on a bender or you know, there's always a spotlight shown on everything that's negative as quick to happen, and so you get inundated by it and that, you know, they talk about. They say that the bad news cells that's what people want to see. What I don't really think that is what people want to see, and neither none of us do, and so we were like look there, you know, for instance, there might be, you know, three guys on an on an NFL football team that get in trouble right for doing one thing or another. They get in trouble and they shot a story on that, but they don't talk about the thousand other players that are going in their community and wherever they live and they're raising a bunch of money and they're creating foundations and they're doing things for their community and bettering their the place that they're living, and we think that's so important for everybody, for actors and actresses and musicians and athletes. There are so many people that are out doing great things. We thought, man, would be cool, let's let's talk about that, like let's go in and let's go in and chary light on that and let's let's go to the events and let's, you know, take a camera crew and show them when it's all about, telling...

...them where the money is going to go, talk about how they got involved in that in the first place and by doing that, hopefully, if he and I can be even slightly entertaining, we can get people to tune in and and kind of at least get a glimpse of it. You never know when it's going to hit the right chord with somebody and continue to help these different causes. That that that that we think are worthy. So, yeah, that's home. That's all. Thank you. Thank you very much. Yeah, and then we have our own yeah, her own foundation is called lyrics for life, and Christen knows, I lost my little brother to cancer. He was diagnosed at fourteen, I was sixteen and he passed away when he was eighteen. And Christian in fact, help me right a little story for this, but remember that. Yes, I could be forgotten out that. That's crazy. Yes, that's together for this and it's a hungry in Florida. Bill mckeen. William Keane put it together. Tom Petty, who's in her other four people. Anyway, she helped me sound like a real rider and and get that out. But you don't come through something like that unscathed. That's that's one of those that's one of those wounds that to this day, obviously as a as a big impact on me, and so all of us in the band have been impacted by cancer and some way, shape or form. I had this idea one day. What if we just got artist to write a lyric on anything like like, take a minute and ride up a verse of your hit Song. You know, thrown an airplane right on a BARF bag. Sin It's us. Will frame it and make it nice. I grew up sturff and I wrote change your mind on a Longboard, and when McCain's a pilot he wrote I'll be on a airplane propeller. And so we were able to get stuff from everybody from James Taylor to Paul McCartney, to get the hood you guys in Togo, girls, John Mayer, all these people, and we do these shows to raise money and we've been able to raise three million dollars for cancer charities, pediatric cancer charities and programs that support the collateral damage around that, you know, as well as the campaigns began a couple of years ago we were going to do this event for the hazelnuts. We had access to this summer camp that we grew up going to his kids and first year we had an empty cabin and somebody said, let's invite some of the kids in their families out here that are going through cancer treatments or whatever. Well, they came out and we went well, we know what this is going to be from now on. So the entire event changed to US scholarshipping kids, siblings, parents from all over the southeast come for three days out at this camp. We write songs, we do concerts, they climb ropes, course, canoeing, archery, look, I do it all, canoeing, animated course, and it's just a great version camp. I mean they just have a great time and it's our it's our opportunity to let them unplug and have a real weekend where they're just being kids. And as a sibling I remember, you know, so much attention is going, as it should, to your sibling who's going through all that, but you're going through all kinds of emotions. You kind of take a back seat sometimes, and so we want them all to come out have a good time. So we're really proud of what we've been able to do with all that. No ill, I got to say I came twenty three years ago for your music and I've stayed all these years later because because of your hearts. I mean you know and and not just the things you do, but your heart is so evident in everything you write, and so I think, I think probably a lot of hazelnuts would join me and saying that. I think that's it keeps coming through again and again and I can't think of a better way to have spent the Wednesday evening of my lunch week. This is so wonderful talking to you guys. I wish we could keep talking your ears off forever. Launch Week. Here's my copy. I'm six chapters in and as the sun of World War Two veteran who is a Jewish was Jewish man who liberated concentration camps, this is cremely powerful and so you should be awfully proud, and I it's yes, you should be awfully proud of bringing this story to light. It's nice. That's nice. Congratulations. Thank you so much. Such a nice thing to say. Well, I'm such a big Fan of yours. That's so nice to hear. Thank you to admirations. I know I love it. Good, good thing I'm hanging out outside your windows talking you as you earlier. Let me just say any of you people out there who have not yet, we ordered elements. Yeah, yeah, it. It's the most wonderful album. You'll listen to it all day...

...and you'll have a little rock in your step. It's wonderful out elements. It's the same. Thank you very much. Thank you. We have taken way too much of your time, but could we impose before you go and and everybody else out there, stick around even after they leave, because we're going to be here talking about the book of last names for a few minutes. We're going to Kattie's gonna give us a writing tip. There's more to go, but if you guys could play us a song, I think you would make my week. Let's do it. Are Happy. I figured out. took a long time. Oh now then, let's turn about Bab because I'm trying. There's been times I'm so comfy can't walk. It is I see. Always be with you. Word. Can't say it. I can't do I thought I set it all called the shut him dripping fall one. There's been time. So curt on my room. She can't hurt and one always be with you. Worth can say. I can't do enough to prove how people maybe rake ups, pour down words sound. lets say what it is. If I always be with you, words, can't see baby, I can't do. Not to scally. I figured out. Took oh now there's turn about baby, because I'm trying. There's been some I'm just can't hurt. It is I see you, if I always be with you, words can say? I can't do enough to prove so fee what to think? Say What it is. I so I was so free. Thank you so much, kind and dry, for being with us when honor and a pleasure. Oh my God, it was so great. Writer. I'll tell you this. That's long. I wrote about an hour and a half. Wow, days, here you are, genius. Oh my gosh, that's amazing. So much. Thanks for having us. We really appreciate that's thank you. Thank your upcoming books. Thank you so much, and you guys do you great to see you. Thank you. By and hey, we're still sticking around the Christian Lee will show me right back. Weren't they amazing? You guys. I was amazing. I'm that was just Oh, it's so, so fun. Oh my Gosh, really that? That's like my anthem song. I played that all the time and so now it's kind of driving again. It's I'm playing it again the team. I could not believe it, but I was telling my parents were here and I was telling them that that Ken and drew were coming on and my mom and I both could...

...seeing the entire that entire song that you know. A lot of times I remember the refrain, which you might not remember, like the whole, like all the verses and stuff. It's like don't time, you know that you wrote a really great song. When I mean, obviously I've heard it since one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven, but not, you know, I'm not getting ready in my bedroom playing at every morning like I used to be so. Well, when he when he said no, when they we're talking about switching genres, that they serve the song. I was like we talked about that all the time, serving to serving the story, thinking about John Ra but serving the story, and he was talking about I just that hit like an error, like yes, it was amazing. It's just that the host is close to you out of the meeting. I was like thanks, thanks, let make sure that makes your pub week complete. Just, Oh my gosh, it's that not so much fun. I mean thank you for inviting them. So Fun. No, I have serious street crid yeah, exactly. Yes, yes, exactly. Well, would you all mind if I took a couple minutes to tell you a little bit about the book of last names with them police. We have been waiting. Well, no, actually in it. Kind of think we've been enjoying the music and no one was really thinking about the book of lasts. A right ruin your nice by telling you about my book. The book of last names came out yesterday. It is in book stores now and I really would encourage you to look at writers block our bookstore the week. That ten percent discount is nice. Plus the chance to win one of twenty of these sister Hazel CDs is is pretty cool too. And also, you know, you can use that ten percent on any of our books, including Mary Alice's recent reussue of the Book Club. But so, the book of last names is the story of a female gorger in World War Two who stumbles into the French resistance mostly by accident and winds up helping save the lives of hundreds of children. So she and her mother are fleeing the Nazis when they wind up in a small French mountain town where a priest who's working for the local resistance network finds out about her false papers that she has forged for herself, and her mother approaches her and recruits her into a forgery network. So soon she meets Remy, who is an accomplished forger with a little bit of an ego, who grudgingly takes her on as an assistant to help forge identities for escaping Jewish children who obviously need their identities changed if they're going to get out to Switzerland or elsewhere. So she becomes passionate, though, not just about preserving the identities of the ones who might be too young to remember, but but also about just keeping their memories alive, making sure they have a way forward in the future. So she and remy decide to encode their names in a seventeen thirty two religious text which they've been again referring to as the book of lost names, hence the title. So toward the end of the war, the book goes missing. After the resistance cell is blown remy goes missing too, and the book has been taken by the Nazis, and so she thinks she's never going to see it again. So sixty years later, AVA is a librarian working in Florida and she happens to glimpse the book in an article in The New York Times about Nazi luded books and the search to return them to their rightful owners. So is the story unfolds in the past. We also see AVA and the present trying to summon the courage to go to Berlin, to travel to Berlin to uncover the last secret and maybe even the last message from Remy that is hidden in the book of lost names. And so I'm not going to take too much of the time. You can see me in five million zooms this week and next week on you know, all over you. I'm inescapable. If you turn on your computer, I will probably be there. It'll probably be glitchy, I'll probably vanished, but I will be there one PM. You are and I are doing one together and I think Patty and I are doing one on Sunday. So I think so. If you guys, if you want to look at my author page on Facebook, I'm going to be again inescapable. I'm just shouting it from the rooftops each time I have something. So go there when to find those out. But I wanted to just show you something really quickly before we move on tonight, and that's the real life book of lost names. So the actual coding in the novel, at the center of the novel is fictional. But when I was working on this novel and I also had there's are now official, which is something that forgers would have used. This is a real copy from June twenty eight, one thousand nine hundred and forty four. I also had a Nazi issued travel document, which is kind of cool. This is something forgers would have forged. I don't know if you can really do you cool. Need of these things in my hands to really like feel the story, you know, to be able to tell the story. And this book of last names, it is a real seventeen thirty two religious text. It almost exactly. The spines match the covers. Amazing. It's like the cover designer was in my head and she had never seen this. But every time I mentioned this book in the novel I was working from the real pages and doing the codes on the real pages.

So this is the real book that it's based on. So that is enough for me about that. But I knew Christian. Yeah, I envisioned it so much bigger, like one of those big I need to use words better. I guess in my mind I'm thinking of a big biblical thing in the church, religious text, but this it was actually just a really common this was the weekly guide to the masses. So it was just something that you might have found in seventeen thirty two in a church Pew. So it was, you know, like now you might find a missing in a church view. It was that. It was that kind of thing. So yeah, really cool to kind of have it and hold with my hands. Basic, man, next time I'll work around my specificity of size. Dude, I really liked about this bug. That, I think, is I mean it's kind of beside the point. It's such a beautiful, beautifully told story and this is certainly a major subplot, but one of the things that really struck me about this story is, as children, how little we really know about our parents sometimes. Yeah, that's a good point, I mean because you know, you have this protagonist that had this whole incredible life that she never really shared with her child and I just thought that was such a fascinating element of the story. That, again, is like a really tiny subplot, but so we're something that you just said that made me think of it and it was so resonant. I think you the whole book was. It was incredible love to you to say, well, thank you. Okay. Well, so now you all know about the book. You know where to buy it, writer's law. We're going to put it. will put it on the friends and fiction facebook group page. Use The code friends fiction for your ten percent off. And actually, Christy, I'm jumping ahead a little bit, I know, and Patty's going to give us a writing tip. But just so I don't have to be repeating myself too many times, Christy, did you want to tell us, just remind us again about that code and and the other books people I have worse. Yes, so if you join our friends and fiction facebook group page, you'll which is www dot facebookcom. backslash groups, backslash friends and fiction, which you're probably on it, but just in case you're not, you'll find the link under announcements to writers Plot Book Store, who was offering ten percent off of our new releases with the cupon code friends fiction between tonight and Saturday. And since we adore sister Hazel and we adore all of you, are giving away twenty copies of their recent EPS earth, wind, water and fire to twenty lucky winners chosen from among those of you who use that cubine code. This week. Among those books you'll find by feels like folly. Mary Alice's on Ocean Boulevard, the recent rerelease of Mary Alice's the bookshop, the book club. Right, Yep, sorry, the book club, Patty's becoming Mrs Lewis, Mary Kay's hello summer, and Christian's new novel, the Book of Lost Names, which just came out yesterday. Thank you, Christy. That's perfect. I do hope you guys will check out writers block. You know, I have to apologize to those of you out out there watchings. I know we usually take your questions and I think we kind of pivoted tonight and thought it would be a little bit more fun to hear from from sister Hazel and I loved hearing them play a song. But Patty has a writing tip for us and then we'll be telling you a little bit about what else she can look forward to this summer. So, Patty, can you give us your writing tip? I can. I'm gonna make this short and sweet. I feel like just listening to sister Hazel was a writing to everything it was. It was and and my favorite was, like I said that the serving the story instead of wearing what it is. What Johenre is it? What you know? What is the story? And serving it. But just just super quick tip tonight comes from one of my favorite books on writing, which is called, coincidentally, on writing by seeing, and it is the tippy has and I abide by it, and it's to write with the door closed and rewrite with the door open. And I love it because the editor on my shoulder is not very nice. My real life editor is amazing, but the editor on my shoulder is just you're that you're not doing it right, it's not right. You're that this is never going to be anything, just like sister Hazel was just talking about. All this generated fear and that tips helped me more than almost anything with that editor voice, in that I can pretend I'm writing it only for myself. I can write with the door shut and pretend no one will ever see it, and I've had to do that more for some books than others. But and then I rewrite with the door open. What is my reader going to think? What are you out there going to think? What am I writer friends going to think? So that's my tip and it's from Stephen King and I stole it, which I think, but it is to write with the door closed and rewrite with the door open. I think that is a great tip. Yeah, that's realized. Thinking of writing. So all of us have a a lot of books out and and if backlist and...

Mary Alice has one of her books from. What year was it? Mary Ell's, do you know? I was trying to remember. It was my it was early. It was probably late s. So it's called the book club and this week is a rerelease of the book club published a few years ago. It's been re edited, updated. There's probably there's a note in there from you, right, and is has a brand new, really cool cover, however. Yeah, it's really cute cover. So I just wanted to let y'all know about that too. What me and you know, considering it from the late S, I think it would pair perfectly with that new sister Hazel item. You might it's sister Hazel CD. You might win if you order a book. So immerse yourself in the late s with the book club and your New Sister Hazel Music a few night and if you want US throw the book a lost dames into your basket. While you're picking up there's Mr Hazel and Mary allous. Perfect perfect. So, Mary Kay, do you want to tell us a little bit about what to expect next week? Yes, friend, all of us, I think, our friends with the Amazing Fiona Davis, whose latest the Lions at Fifth Avenue, comes out in just two weeks. I know Kristen loved it because she's already read it and she blurred it, and I know Patti's been loving it as well. And Fiona writes great historic fiction and usually she's kind a really unusual approach to her books. I think all of them have been centered around historic buildings in New York City. Is that? Is that curriculm? Yeah, anyway. So Fiona will be here with us next week and we can't wait to have her. And this one is centered around the New York Public Library. So and just Tians, who knows the name of the Lions? Who? I do? It's you for prudence, and I think no, yes, yes, prudence, fortitude, ornitude, I don't she'll be here to tell us next week. Look at no, I have done a couple of events in the past week with Fiona, since we both have books that deal with libraries. And I'm just going to say this. Somebody has to ask her next week about the dead body. It's not in the book. There's she has a great dead body story, so we'll call it all right, calling it yeah, how all right? Mary Ellis after Fiona next week. You kind of want to run US through the rest of the summer, which is yes, it's sad, great summer girls. After Fiona will have Allen Hildebrand on August bit and I know a lot of our viewers I've been asking for her, and then Karen Slaughter on August twelve and our beloved Christine and MC Morris comes on August nineteen and then the just us episode, followed by Eta Room on September two, and that is our summer. We are also hard at work on our fall schedule and I'm like bursting at the seems to tell people, but we can't yet. But it's going to be amazing. So we're so excited and there is going to be a fall schedule. So you guys are going to be able to you know and not be able to be forced to listen to us for the next month. But we promise will make it good. So thank you so much. What a wonderful way to spend our Wednesday evening. We were so honored to welcome Kenn and drew from sister Hazel, and we hope that you all out there had as much fun with them as we did. I know I'm going to be singing all for you all night. And also Strange Cup of tea, which drew mentioned, which is just a song. I love that. I once it gets in your head, it is there. It's a great song. It's not not a bad problem to have. So thank you, as always, everyone out there, for sharing your time with us, for supporting our books and for supporting local booksellers, which is so important right now. Every book you buy from a local bookseller is a good deed for the literary community. Plus, bonus, you get the book. So one more reminder that to say thanks to all of you. We've got those twenty CDs there, twenty that we're going to just ship with your purchase from writers block, as long as you use that friends fiction code. It is up right now on our friends and fiction page. I'll put it up again along with all the links to sister Hazel, and that's about it. Anything else, ladies, anything for many of you. Hurrah for you. Don't forget to buy the book of blocks. Name you and also the Book Club. Say something. Happy Book Birthday. I want to remind people that if you have read a book, not just our book, but any book that you have loved, it's so meaningful to the authors, to their to their success. If you'll leave a review, an online review. If you have something nasty to say, keep that to yourself. And if you and if you, for example, if you want a terrible rug pad that you hated, maybe don't give the rug pad review to your favorite author. That happened to me this week. So now on Amazon it's...

...like this does not stick to my rug at all, which we all hate when our books don't do that stick. Yeah, so amazing. Mama said, if you can't say something Nice, don't say anything. It's right, all right, ladies, thank you so much, and it to all of you out there. Thank you so much. Thanks for spending some time with us. We are friends and fiction and that's a wrap. Good night, good night. Stay safe out there. You've been listening to the friends and fiction podcast. Be Sure to subscribe to the friends and fiction podcast wherever you listen and if you're enjoying it, leave a review. You can find the friends and fiction authors at www and fictioncom, as well as on the facebook group page friends and fiction. Come back soon. Okay, there are still lots of books, writing tips, interviews, publishing news and bookstores to chat about. Goodbye,.

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