Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 2 months ago

Friends & Fiction with Laura Dave plus Nancy Thayer on the Aftershow

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Four welcome #1 New York Times bestselling author Laura Dave to talk all about her mega-selling phenomenon THE LAST THING HE TOLD ME, which has spent nearly a full year on the NYT bestseller list. The crew talk about research, setting, character developmnet, and Laura's involvement in the television adaptation of her book as a limited series with Hello Sunshine for AppleTV starring Jennifer Garner. On the after show, F&F fave Nancy Thayer makes a return appearance to discuss her latest Nantucket-based novel, SUMMER LOVE.

Welcome to friends and fiction. For New York Times best selling authors endless stories, novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Kristin Harmel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. To highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi, every won. It is Wednesday night and that means we are right here with you for friends and fiction and we have an amazing, amazing show ahead for you. I am Patty Callahan Henry and I am not in prison. I am in a library. For sure. I'm gonna Climate Mary Kate. I'm Mary Ca Andrews, coming to you from a golf resort in the Florida panhandle. I'm Christen Hermel, coming to you from the same place I always come to you from. That's interests you. It's in Harvey at home. I'm so happy this is the first time for you and a long time my friend. Yeah, and this is friends and fict them for New York Times best selling authors, endless stories to support independent booksellers, libraries like Urian's authors, readers. And today we are talking with Laura Day about her blockbuster a book. Way Of allread and Gun Bananas Over the last thing he told me. And then for the after show, we are so excited. Nancy player is going to join us with her newest summer love, which wants me to break out saying and some love, but I'm not gonna do it. No, not gonna do it. But they don't know. They don't allow that at the prison. No, how singing it like those little plenty cups. I'm at the library, not in prison. But before we get rolling, seriously, we pre taped our show last week with Abriana to Gianmi, and so we were not able to celebrate the astounding, the amazing Maryk Andrews hitting number five, I'm the New York Times listed. We are so very kate. Congratulations, my friend. This book is amazing. Years Proud of you. She like all of us, including Meg Walker and Sean, I think we all felt like we hit the list, but really only Mary Kaye. And you know how somes you wake up and you have this feeling and it takes you a minute to realize. Journey woke up and had just like not in my stomach and I was like, why do I happen? Not In my stomach, and reason, day she's gonna then we absolutely are. Yeah, congratulations, very thank thanks everybody who bought the book. Damn it, you, you did my bidding. Well, fantastic. All right. Well, before we we get to talk to Laura, we want it to remind you. So a few weeks ago we announced our partnership with a really cool new social platform called fable, a book club APP for Social Reading, and you all out there have responded in such an amazing way. So if you're wondering what fable is, I'll tell you. It is a social reading APP for online book clubs. Fable is a free APP for your phone or tablet with loads of incredible book clubs you can join. Their mission is to deliver the world's best social experience with exceptional stories for everyone, and we have joined voices, Yep, that word. We have joined force with fable to start a brand new premium book club. We are calling friends and fiction...

...behind the book. This is an interactive book club led by US. That's right, every single month we will have a new book and you'll get to join in. It's a really immersive experience. It's not just a regular book club. There's all kinds of immersive things on the back end that you can join up for and as you read with us on fable and you'll discover the story behind every featured book, plus fascinating insider talk with the authors. Fables unique social reading fee us will let you share your reactions and your thoughts and your favorite quotes with us and your fellow readers and gain access to special resources that you can't find anywhere else. So everybody was reading my the wedding dail which is so nice, and this week we are switching to our second selection, the home wreckers by Mary Kay Andrews, known forever more as just number five Ken the fable dot Co backslash friends and fiction to sign up today. So a lot of you have asked us about the pricing on this. So fable as an APP is free. You can join some of the free groups on fable, but if you want to be part of the friends and fiction experience, and we hope that you do. I mean this is something you know. We put some time into curating it. We it's a very interactive experience with us. If that's just five dollars a month, which you know stretched out over the years about sixty. But you could also purchase, for just ten dollars more, a seventy annual membership which allows you access to all the premium club so it's a kind of it's a really cool APP like and Sean Aston has a premium club. Levar Burton from Reading Rainbow and roots has its am a premium club. It's really cool. So for seventy you can get access to all or for just five dollars a month you can get access to ours. So we hope lots of you will subscribe and join us on there. It's another way to experience all this friends and fiction fun. I already downloaded the APP. Have you? Yes, and I guess everybody has heard that. The four of us on the road together together again. No, we have two friends and fiction. Two more friends and fiction live events left this season. This is your chance to come see us all together. We are headed to the Jersey shore this coming Friday may twenty that's just two days away for another front fun theater event. This time we'll be hosted by independent bookstore bookdown in Manasquand, New Jersey. We also have a third event on tap, a luncheon event on July twenty one in Rhobeth Beach, Delaware. We hope you can join us on the road at one of these big friends and fiction live celebrations. Were so excited to meet with so many of you and in person. And we will have this autograph tour posters for Sale in New Jersey this week. We had a little printing error that kept us from selling them in Cleveland. So we're so sorry, but our reprint has landed to get yours hot off the press on the Jersey Shore. That's awesome all right, and don't forget, as you know, we continue to encourage you to support independent booksellers when and where you can, and one way to do that is to visit our own friends and fiction bookshop dot org page, where you can find Laura's books, Nancy's books and books by the four of us and our past guests at a discounts. Okay, now it's the fun parts. Now we get to welcome our guests Laura Day. Laura is a Number One New York Times best selling all for author of the last thing he told me, and other novels, including eight hundred grapes and the first husband. Her fiction and essays have been published in The New York Times, E is, PN, red book, Glamor and Ladies Home Journal, dubbed a Rye observer of modern love by USA. Today Laura was named a fun and fearless phenom of the year. I did that without tripping over my words because of polity. Awesome. Yeah, it is, I know, by Cosmopolitan magazine and her work has been published in over thirty countries. Several of her novels have been optioned for Film and Television and Laura is adapting her novel the last thing he told me, which was a reese's book club pick for Hello,...

...sunshine and Apple, and we cannot wait. I don't think we're not talking about that. Laura currently resides in Santa Monica, California, and the paperback version of the last thing he told me is going to be released on on can you please bring Laura? I it's so nice to see you all and I was clapping from backstage on number five, so well deserved. We agree. Well, well, from Laura. We have been talking about having you on. We've been trying to get you on. We're so excited to have you on with us. But before we get into a deep dive, I want you to tell everyone out there what your book is about and then, our favorite, what it's really about it. I like them. Well, my book is about a woman. Well, have the Mug so I can hold it. Oh, I want that mud. I mean, I know I love the Mug Because, Oh, you can have a Mug. If you'd like a money, send you a Mug. The mug is great because it goes from morning tonight and then no one knows what's inside of it, so that we're not going to ask you what's inside of it either, just so you can have your privacy. But the book is really about this woman, Hannah Hall, who finds herself living her dream life. She's newly married to a man, Owen Michaels, who she really has. She is not settled. She married him on the later side. She is around forty and she's newly married to him and he has a sixteen year old daughter who is not particularly interested in her. But despite that, they're doing quite well. She moved to their community and saw Salto a floating home community, and they're going about their lives. She's an artisan, she's a Wood Turner and she thinks they're going about their lives, I should say, until she wakes up and finds out that her husband's tech firm is involved in roiled, I say, and a financial scandal and he has disappeared, leaving in his wake just to note protect her. And that is all she has to go on. That and a sixteen year old step daughter who wants very little to do with her. And together they try to unravel the mystery as to wear Owen is and who he actually is together. And what's it really what it's really about? And I started writing it in two thousand and twelve, so I should probably have it figured out by now. I think it's really about the primal story of the way someone becomes a mother, all the different iterations of how that might happen. Oh, I love that. Oh and Laura, it's just such a well done book. We were saying before we went on the air that a few of us have listened to it on audiobook while on book or so it's just one of those. You know, when your mind is spinning in your own book, Tori, you get so many things that you're thinking about. You need something that you can really fall into and focus on, and this was, I mean, this did it for me. This kept me company for several long days on the road. I really loved it. So, Laura, there are so many themes that are important for Hannah Hall, from Motherhood, as you said, to love to art. But can you talk to us about the original seed of the idea? This is a little bit different than what you've done in the past. It's definitely, definitely is the original seed, and this maybe is comforting to anyone who's, like all of us on this call, find ourselves working on a book for a long time. The original seed was all the way back in two thousand and three. So I was reginning thinking about this book nineteen years from that. But I watched an interview with Lynda Lay, Kenneth Lay's wife,...

...who, as a reminder, since it was so long ago, was the CEO of Enron and right after that scandal broke she gave an interview on the today show which she said my husband's done nothing wrong and that immediately penetrated for me and I thought leaving a side. Whether she meant that or didn't mean that or you know, I don't I don't know her. Obviously, I started to imagine a woman who did find herself in a situation where there was a paradox going on between who she knew her husband had to be, based on her inner belief in him, and who the world was telling her he was. And I started thinking about that. And simultaneously, at that moment in time, I watched a second interview in which Reese Witherspoon actually, funny enough, quoted Gloria Steinem and the quote really is something about how important it is to for women to watch other women become the hero of their own lives. And those two things started rattling around for me, which is if I were to really do a deep dive on a woman who found herself in that situation, in that paradox, I would want her to be on a heroes journey, because I've seen that done, where she's on a victim's journey. So I start up sat with that for a long time and it wasn't until two thousand and eleven when I got married. Friends of my husband good friends of my husband gave us this beautiful Wood Turn Bowl for our wedding present and until then I knew nothing about wood turning and I started to think about everything that goes into wood turning, because I didn't know. You know, you start with this giant piece of wood, you pick a piece of lumber and you turn it into a blank and you mill it and then you end up putting it on a lathe and you turn it into this incredible work of art, and all the things that go into that, the strength, the perseverance, the faith, and I thought, okay, well, this is a woman who naturally is a hero in her own life and her daily life with her work, and so I wanted to think about that and how to infuse that character into this scenario, which is sort of how the book was born all the way back then. That's so interesting and you know, I'm wondering, especially because you sat with this book for so long, because this was something that, you know, took so long to form for you. I think that when we write through stuff that's really speaks to us, we put something into, something of ourselves into the books, and then maybe we take something away from it. Also, I'm wondering if this affected the way you live your life at all. Writing with such purpose a woman who's the hero of her own life. Did that impact the way you live? You know, I think it might have, but maybe not in the way one would hope, which is that thea was so oh hard and the first couple of years I was writing it I had in my mind I never written sort of a mystery before, and I had in my mind the last scene, which is something I'm so interested to hear. I would love to hear, and meanwhile I am downloading that your new program immediately because that just sounds amazing. The APP as I say the word right. Yeah, you know, I think writers write in different ways. In the way I always write, as I never know what's going to happen, but because it was a mystery, I thought I needed to know and I had this last scene in my mind which was constantly driving me down the wrong road, because the last scene, oh, basically directly in opposition to how I ended up ending the book. So the first several years writing and wanting her to be a hero, she was on a heroes journey, but it was the wrong heroes journey. I'm a love story I thought I was telling wasn't the main love story, which...

...was between Hannah and the step daughter. I don't so it was. It was an exercise and misery, and isn't all of writing this this really for me, almost did me in and I remember I sent the first draft to my agent, who was like after years, you know, and she was like it's just not working, like it's not what you think it is, and I put it aside and ended up writing eight hundred grapes, which I was, you know, a love letter to wine making, which Christ Chris, and I know you understand. I think you have your own true yes, you're absolute and I you know. And that was and I ended up going back to it. I ended up just trying to but it was it was a wrestling match really, until I had my son and I in two thousand and sixteen and I realize what it was really about, that primal story of a woman becoming a mother, but also it was a heroes journey that was different than the heroes journey I thought it was telling, and from that point on the writing became much, much more joyful because I let go of thinking I was writing toward a certain end and I wrote it almost how I write in my other books and I threw out sixtyzero words of the yeahs and words I had. Oh well, we're glad you did. You all just died just a little. It's so funny because when I when I was working on earlier books, someone once asked me writing advice and I always said writing is what you're willing to throw out, and I really feel like it was someone knocking on my shoulder being like you sure about that, because I to mind it really means yeah, nikes. Well, there are just so many cool things that we could talk about in this book. You mentioned Hannah's job, is a wind turner, which is something that you know, we had discussed that we were really fascinated I but also the setting of this book. They live in a floating home community and Saucalido, which is such a unique setting that also echoes the metaphors and themes of this novel. So can you talk to us about the setting for this book and how you came to that decision to set it where you did? I really like writing books that exist on the edge of the world in some way. You know, Western County, Montauk, New York. Now the floating home community of Saucalido because I think it requires something so different from its inhabitants. You know, from the community, the dependence on each other. Both it's like this another paradox. You know your neighbors really well and you don't know them at all and you get both be anonymous and not anonymous at all, and how you exist. And I love learning more about the floating home community and the way it's such an interior world, even though it's on the bay, and the way there's four hundred floating homes there. Everyone seems to know each other. They're deeply protective of each other. So I have characters here who really needed to hide from an outside force and it seemed like a really great place to hide and plain sight. So that's sort of how I can't I love that. Also, was the shop inspired by anything in real life? Know, the shop was more my reimagining of the Enron scandal and that in in modernizing it in some way. As it took me, you know, twelve years together there and moving get into the tech world, which is near. I thought, okay, if they're going to be in Sausalito, what industry would he be in? And how would that manifest itself? But what it has in common with Enron, what it has in common now with several other tech scandals, is the Hubriss at the top to think you can get away with this. Okay, now let's talk about the movie, because that's what everybody wants to know about now. Well, I know your husband's a screenwriter and I guess...

...you are too. I know you're writing the screenplay for the last thing. He told me. And Jennifer Garner. Nobody ever heard of her. Is starry like that? She's got brown hair, yes, but yeah, a couple playing on her. I just know her phony cooking show that I love on my God. Yeah, small, yeah, I saw the post with her name, Hannah Hall, on the door. Yes, awesome. When you were writing this, did you? Did you? was screenplay flashing in the back or the front of your mind? You know, it was really nowhere in my mind when I was writing this, and actually a bunch of things came together force to develop this. We're actually in production right now, which explains us so very long, long days on set. But so you know, my husband is a screenwriter, so I'm sort of familiar with screenwriting in that world. A little bit, but he writes very, very different things. You know, he wrote spot late and he worked on the West Wing, so it's sort of a very different world. But this book in so many ways is really in Ode to family and found family and love and trust, and it just felt like a natural thing for us to embark upon together. Probably wasn't the wisest moved to embark on it during quarantine and the pandemic, but you know, it has all worked out and we started shooting at the beginning of May and it's going to be a limited series on apple that comes out early next year. I can't wait. Okay, you talked about family just now. Will you talk about about Bailey, the sixteen year old stepdaughter? Several of US here, Patty and I, have both raised sixteen year olds and we have lived through that eyrolling. I hate you fuck off who when we lived through that phase? Yeah, we all just popped out. Drama. It's all what you're your child is young. That right, so, but maybe you were that kind of sixteen year old. Tell us you know. So I am very lucky to be a loving a godmother to four teenagers, three of whom live across the street from me. Oh yeah, and so I feel like I have had a window into what it means to be even a really great kid and trying to certify your independence and realie. I really have so much empathy for because she's doing it in this really heightened state, which is to say, not only does she have a new stepmother, but we're meeting her after she's left with this new stepmother. So she was kind of cranky to begin with and now all of a sudden, it has always been her and her single father and now she's alone with someone who she doesn't know or trust. So I took a lot of what I know from these kids, who I love so much, and try to imagine them in a scenario where they don't have the love of their parents, where they don't have the love of my husband and myself, and throw them into a situation with somebody knew who, wall well intentioned, is kind of a stranger, and that allowed me to really amp up the anxiety that I think so many sixteen year olds feel. Yeah, I was gripping the steering wheel of the car while we put on audio readliving and my I actually my granddaughter's almost thirteen and we're already getting a taste of that set tweens. Yeah, yeah, funny thing is when you listen to it and you hear Bailey acting like that and and you've been through it, you're like, oh, yeah, but it's young to be okay, yeah, you know what I...

...mean. Like it because you've been there and you I remember as psychiatrist telling me one time that I don't know it's true or not, but that the root word for adolescence is disturbance and that and that it's like the biggest change in anybody's like that going through adolescence. And if you can remember that when they're being the eye rolling fbomb teenager, maybe you can be a little rid it out a little bit more. So when when Bailey was acting like that, I was thinking it's going to be okay, it's going to be a kind of okay. Yeah, Oh my God, I love that. I've never heard that. That's like changing, and isn't it? Remember it. Yeah, just to take that breath and like step back and be like, okay, they're supposed to be having a rough time, they're supposed to let it out on me, I mean within reason. Yes, yeah, yeah, that's so true. So, Laura, all of your novels have had women at the center of the story and the Interior lives of these women are so richly depicted, and I think that, I mean, I think that's something we all endeavor to do. Like you, just kind of dig deep and see what you can find and see what what you can put on the page that will really let readers into your character. But I wanted to talk to you about Hannah as the stepmother. So you talked about the daughter a little bit. Can you talk to us a little bit about Hannah as in her role as the stepmother? Are and, I think, partially what I'm curious about. You mentioned you have a child who was born in two thousand and sixteen. He said yes, may meet me too. So I also have a son who's says he's yeah, just turned six. So I'm curious because it's a different dynamic. Do you see yourself at all in Hannah as the mother, like, are there pieces of your mothering experience in Hannah and the book? Well, you know, I think what I really relate to with Hannah is, and this is something I hadn't really seen, I feel like often in movies when a stepmother is depicted or in television shows she's sort of antagonistic to the daughter and they're both sort of competing for the father husband's love. And what I wanted to suggest here is the one thing both of them were certain of was Owens love. They were both sure of that. So actually that triangulation is quite different. It's really someone who just doesn't have the tools. She didn't have a mother herself, and so I think what I relate to is the idea that I think we have this magical idea that someone out there has the tools and then when you're in it, you realize in different ways none of us do, and so it's really the process of acknowledgement when you get it wrong and figuring out how to show back up, and so I wanted to sort of honor that that it looks like that for everybody, Stepmother's Mother's, you know, mother figures, anybody that's really trying to have a positive influence on a child, and so in that way I really felt for Hannah. I feel like I started in the same position as her as really desperately wanting to do my best and learning that you do your best almost by accident on the days when you show up when it's the last thing you feel capable of doing. I want to write that point. Yes, I'm going to have to play that over and over again when I I'm having like that mom self doubt of being a mom of a six rolls. It's it reminds me when people ask for writing advice or mom advice, you always want to say the secret is there's a secret. All right, exactly your fast. Yeah, it's so funny. I mean that you say that, Patty, because I always think about you know, people said to me, often said to me before I had my son, you know, or when I was pregnant. I felt like people felt they could come up and say like, oh, your writing is going to be in trouble now, or this is everything's going to change or whatever. And actually, in some...

...ways I feel like it helped it, because it actually is the same secret, which is one that it's no secret or it's too in that if there is any secret, it's figuring out how to show up for it. Just show up for it like that, you're going to sit down and some days it's going to work out and some days it's not, but you sit down again, you know. So it's just it makes you more loyal to both. I think they help each other in some ways. Because so it was so interesting that you said that, because I had a book that well, it ended up being my dabut novel, but then I started and then kind of put aside and wrote a couple of other things and then my son was born and I came back to it and it was like it opened up this thing inside of me. I don't even really know how to explain it, but it gave me this entirely different perspective and it like made the Book Work Somehow because like I knew all these things that I've been there before. I don't know, it is an interesting it's interesting how you kind of change, I guess a little bit. But I'm going to ask you the question that everyone wants to any answer to. Is there going to be a sequel? Is there any chance? I think maybe I'm writing. Okay, now I'm I'm working another book now, on the off chance my editor is watching, I'm working, working diligently up for it is poking editor. She's exactly we logged on. She was working when we got here, typing as we speak. In fact, I can hear that. Yeah, I mean it was so funny. The other day I spoke to her and she's like, how's the book coming on? Like I'm literally sitting I'm literally sitting on a set trying to hold it together. But sure, but just kidding out of love, you, mercy so. But I was going to say this is the sequel. I know what it is now, like I see it, like it's sort of ungulized in my mind. So in theory, yes, there is going to be a sequel, because I really know what the story is, but in reality it's another book away. Probably. Oh, can I can I actually ask a question about that. Did knowing did knowing what the sequel is? Was that clarified by working on it as a television production? Did digging at it from a different angle help you to see the way forward? Yes, I think it did. I actually because also like that the combination of that and I did not realize it's so funny because you know, I always think about storytelling as like conversation. It's what you start, but then the reader finishes and the reaction to the end of the book, without ruining the book, has been avoided. It heavy, can you tell? I mean divisive, like some people write to me and say, like I I it's I love that ending and I get some like, I mean hate mail is strong, but like, you know, how could you do this to me? Like how could you end here? Like people have really, really strong opinions about it in a way that to me it felt like once I found it, maybe I wanted to be like I wrote the other ending. It did not work. I really think you want and it's not the end of this part of the story. But somehow, in the process of interacting with readers about the book and Canon Core, in conjunction, I should say, with working on the show, I realized that that original end of the book is really the end of the second buck. No, I see my own bomb. Okayy. So, so, you know, at that point it will have been thirty years. But you know, I knock on wood, you know, I do think I see my way to it now. Wow, that's awesome, amazing for entertain to really encouraging. Yeah, I mean, you've already given us such great tips. The thing you just said about, you know, a book as a conversation between the author and the reader. I've ever thought of it that way and I've written thirty so how about sharing another great writing tip with us. We love hearing it and we really want to peek inside your mind. I mean, I think that...

...everyone has to figure out what works for them, but I do believe that what you do the first thing every day is sometimes what you are able to pay the most attention to. And so for me personally, I try to have my butt in my seat early in the day and get my writing then before I engage with the rest of my life whenever possible, and different people recommend word count. I try to do that, but I feel like I have accomplished something if I am in my chair doing my work before I turn on social media, before I turn on email, before I do the you know, eight hundred other things that are required of all of us. That has been how I have managed to, I think, be the most successful with my own work. You know, I wrote a book in Graduate School, my first novel, and and I moved back to New York from Virginia and I spilled water on my computer and I lost the whole thing. Oh No, how would I did my stomach just it's was really something. But I do in some ways look back and I have a silver lining for that because at that point. Then I had no safety blanket, so I was working. I had thirteen jobs that first year. I was writing for ESPN and tooting private school kids and doing all the things to sort of make ends me. But I taught myself that writing always came first by getting up at five am every day, writing five to ten and then working, and I think it was so it's so indelible now in my mind that even though I feel like I have a real luxury now and getting to for a living, I still do that. I still get up every day as though at any time water can land on my computer and that's going to be the only time I have to write. I've stuck with that for all the books I love. Wow, that discipline really comes in handing it, I thinks. I think. You know, I some people say like do you wait for the Muse or do you wait in the stry? I mean, I would just be living my life watching I in a garden that I was no, that's my inspiration. I want to go watch her, say how is that and move along. So, yes, that's such an advice, though, and I used to be really good about that and then I got really bad about it for like a few years and just as week I've been like okay, till it's ten am, but I'm not checking anything until ten am, because you're right, once you check it, but your day you're done, your brain is and I'm like wow, I can write so much when I don't have everything else. Yes, it's shocking. I chosen. In the car today I listened to an interview with Neil Gay men. I mean talk about wild imagination, right, and he said almost the same thing, and about the morning, except he does it in the middle of the night, or used to, but he said what he does. It sounds like you, which is he put a rule in place. He doesn't have to write, but he can't do anything else. You don't have to write from five to ten, but you can't do anything else. I like that and I just like rewound. Listen to it again. Re Why listen to again? You don't have to write, but you can't do anything else. But and at some point you're going to be bored enough to be like well, fine, I can as well. Right, Laura, how does that work? I I'm curious too, because we're in the same boat. How does that? And I do the same thing. I get up early and right. I mean seriously, everything that's coming out of your mouth today. I'm like yes, yes, me too, me too, like I you're clearly my long lost best striends here it. How does that work with having having a child the same age as a child I have? Hey, do you? I mean it, it's your child's an think like mine. There's not a huge amount of respect for mommy schedules on, whether you like it or not. Sometimes, I mean he's not being on set. It's been two weeks and...

...it's a route awakening for him because he I come home from work and he's like did you miss me? Like afually, if you're working at home, they're like that's not work, like, what do you hear in the other room? So it's very it's a challenge I have. I have moved it. Either my husband will take him in the morning when my husband can, which is often because since he's a screenwriter, it's flexible and we're lucky that we're on opposite schedules. He likes to write at night and so he gets free as the day goes on. So that's been that's a that's lucky, or I take him to school, which is thirty and I do not check email before I take him to school. I I shift the idea of it. You know, there's a soft world software called freedom, which I highly recommend, which like shuts you off from the world. You can't check anything, you know, you can't do any of your research, even if you're like, oh, but I need to know this, you have to wait till after to check that, you know. So I just shift it to work with his his school schedule. It doesn't work quite as well, but you know, you make that allowance. Yeah, same, thankful. Yeah, I think the real humans and my morning like disrupt my focus, like the Internet. Yes, it's true. True, there's our text, drength. Yeah, there really is. I find like, if I turn social media on, one even turn it on, my writing day is over. I don't know what. There's something about that energy, that performative, and yet it, all of it, is some of you know. AGAIN WE'RE BACK TO HINA garden dream. So I watch social media but, like you know, there's some about it, that inherent performance, of the Im Chet of social media, of all of it, that takes me right out, takes me right out of that vulnerable writing space. Yep, yeah, well, any books on your nightstand that we might be surprised to find there. Oh my gosh, my nightstand. I would show it to you if it wasn't so terrifying when I tell you I have like literally, and I'm not exaggerating, maybe thirty eight books piled on it. It's just for a while I didn't even have a nightstand and it was just the books. But there are. There's probably a bunch that would be surprising. I tend to read a lot of science books. Really interested in like science and psychology. Honestly, like what you just said about Christian what you just said up. Oh No, Patty said it's sorry about disturbance is with me forever. Now. You know, adolescence being disturbance. So some books that are maybe, that are surprising, that are up there just because there are on the older I still have pride and prejudice sitting there because I have books I re read again and again. heartburned by Nora Fron is there. slouching toward Bethlehem by Joan didion lives on my nightstand. I have right now I have a book called Five families, which is a book about crime, on my night's Dand that might be suppressing doesn't seem to fit in the Zeitgeist of the others. What else is on my nightstand right now? The empire of pain has been there for a while now. The Sadler family, which plays into my new book a little bit. So those are some of them. That's awesome. That's awesome. Is there anything that you've read lately that you've just loved, that I've read recently that I just loved? That is such a that is a really good question. Oh, I love the caretakers, which out. I thought that. I think it came out in end of March. Thought that was wonderful. It's a takes place in Paris. Can't really beat that. That's good. Okay, Laura, if you wouldn't mind sticking around for just a few more minutes please. We have a couple of announcements and then one more thing. Okay, grace, have you bought your coffee from Charleston Coffee...

Riisters yet? Because we have, and everyone in our friends in fiction community gets twenty percent off all bagged coffees on their website with the code coffee with friends. Don't forget the fabulous book and Coffee Bundles that CCR has on offer as well books signed by US and paired with the roast and grind of your choice. We can't think of anything better than that. And don't forget to enter our monthly giveaway. We've got one winner left to announce for the month of May, our March and April. April winners are already enjoying their coffee, so you can in her to win at three month coffee of the month club subscription and ninety dollar value using the entryform shared our social media and in our newsletter. Good Book. And guess what is this week, besides Mary K Andrews hitting number five on the list and having an amazing guest in Lord Dave? And there there's another thing. It is our fifty of writers block podcast. Fifty fifty, a riders block podcast. So you know this is every Friday and it's different than the show Ron Block. Our Librarian, rock star, helped host it. A new episode drops every single Friday. On the last episode, Ron and I talked to the authors Kelly Stewart and Amy Runyon about their new books and about bringing history to life. And this coming week run and prison talk to Jane Porter and being crane about being prolific writers and friendship and community in writing perform to hear all of these powerful women talked about their process and theirs. Yeah, I've never Mega Jane for about almost twenty years now and I think Megan has just completed her when out in thirty novel dear Lord. Yeah, and she's like she's about buying. So I feel really myself that. Yeah, they're amazing. It was a podcast, so I hope you tune in to that. We know many who had participating in our very first friends if fiction being challenge. So this month for me we are encouraging you to dive into a beach read and if you're looking for a way to keep track of these books and your other reading, we would love to recommend our beautiful reading journal at Oxford Exchange. It is a gorgeous friends and fiction blue linen cover and plenty of space to record your thoughts and what you're reading. So we love seeing your posts on the page. And do you know what makes a really good beach read? Just saying it does good. Thank you, Christen. The text of the mail. The friends and official book club also is having a great last if you're not there, you're missing out. The group and they are separate from US and are run by our friends Lisa Harrison and Brenda Garner. They're nearly twelvezero strong now and hopefully you'll join me live on their page on June twenty when we will be discussing my new novel, the homers. Okay, and then next week, right here at zero P M on Wednesday night, we will welcome tea Williams with her newest seven days in June, which was a refe pet. I think I know someone else who was a flora day, and TJ Newman, who's debut falling exploded onto the scene a few months ago. So if you're ever wondering about our schedule and you know where to find it on the friends and fiction website and on the header graphic on our facebook page. We're not done with somebwere to talk about. And don't forget that Nancy Thayer is joining us in the actorshop. All right, but before we get to Nancy we want to ask Laura One more question. So, Laura, we always like to ask what were the values around reading and writing when you were growing up? It was everything in my house. So I would read every night with my dad when he'd get home from work. I loved books from the time I was so little. I remember one of the first book they they one...

...of the first books they got me penelope, penelope gets wheels, which I have been looking for forever. It's out of print. I cannot be this on a podcast and a reader found it and sent it to me. So here's hoping real things for you. Yes, love that books so much. It wasn't bad book. It was a different book, but I said that same thing and yes, no, I'm very sheet. She wants a bike and she gets roller skates. I just loved it. But so I that was everything in my house, storytelling, reading, so that there were I really have always learned to understand the world in that way. I just loved it always. That's awesome. We'd love to ask that because knowing how authors come to the thing that they do, I don't think we've talked to anybody. If somebody can remember someone we've talked to who hasn't said that books were like a lifeblood to them and they were a kid. Whether their parents gave them to them are not. They were. They that in libraries seem to be such a theme. So I'd love to hear that. Laura, thank you so much for spending time with us, for talking about motherhood and process and being the hero of your own light, which is going to echo in my head for a little while. And I think there was so much hope in you telling us. You know, here you are with this this phenomenal blockbuster about to be a show, and you're saying you couldn't find your way through it and had to put it down and start another one. And thank you for sharing all of that with us. Its been such a pleasure talking to you. Oh, it's been such a pleasure talking to you and I'm gonna have to tune in next week. I've met TJ actually at a store, coincidentally. We were both signing books and she's she's the loveliest. So everyone say, you guys are going to love her. That looks really great. That's awesome. Thanks, Glora. Thank you. Thank you, Laura, for having you. This was a highlight of my day than Oh, you're being on the set of your TV show. We don't believe it, but that's how you don't believe I'm heading back into the other room to watch another episode of nailed it. I'm I promise you. This is the highlight. Okay, awesome, thanks, Laura I. Okay, now everyone makes shortest taper after show with Nancy Fair. And don't forget that you can find all of our back episodes and Youtube, because we live there every single week, just like on facebook and if you subscribe, but you won't miss a thing. Plus, be sure to come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome Tia and teach it. That was I could talk to her friends her. Yeah, I think we need to have a watch party when. Yeah, we sure do. I'm meant to say that before she got off. Like we all need to like gather and then I can't wait to see how much of it lines up with yeah, but since we since we all love the book. But now we want to welcome Nancy payer. Nancy is the New York Times best selling author of over thirteen novels, just like our Mka, including summer house, beachcomber's island girls, the guest cottage. She's an azing she is and she's a friend to all of us. Her novels often center around the mysteries and Romance of families and relationships, and her work has been translated into countless languages. Sometimes we even see our names or friends and authors. Easter eggs and her books. Nancy's novels have also been condensed or eggscert excerpted. See now there's a word. Patti. Fun is good. Did you see? I didn't give it to myself. You really want to put that on somebody else? God given? No, not just somebody else. You me several literary reviews and magazines, including Red Book and good housekeeping. In two thousand and fifty seen she was awarded...

...the Romantic Times career achievement award for mainstream fiction. Nancy has a be a and M A and English literature from the University of Missouri Kansas City. She has lived on Nantucket island year around for thirty three years. Poor Nancy with her husband, daughter is the novelist Samantha Wild John. Let's bring her on. Can you hear me? Yes, great, see you. Are you on Nantucket right now? Of course, yes, we're so envious. Yeah, welcome Nancy. We're so happy to have you here to talk about summer love. Can you sing summer loving for us? We're not going to make you do that. I'm not gonna thank you that we're going to make Christen do that. We're so happy to have you. Before we get taking a deeper diet, we want you to tell everybody what summer love is about. Then there's a added thing to it. We want you to tell us what it's really about. Can you hear us? Oh, I can hear you. Yes, okay, can you tell us what it's about, and then what it's really about. Yeah, UM, summer love is about for people who come to Nantucka to one thousand nine hundred and ninety five. They've graduated from college and they all have these dreams of what they're going to be and then they come back in two thousand and twenty and have a reunion and we see how their lives worked out and they bring some of them bring their children. So it really is about people coming to Nantucket to work when they're no longer teenagers, because I always thought, because I was a teenager I've had teenagers, that you can make a lot of mistakes when you're a teenager, but I assume by the time you're twenty or twenty one you're an adult and that you don't make those mistakes. And the more I thought about it, the more I realized that's not true. I made some mistakes. My children makes mistakes. I'm fortunate because my life turned out the way I wanted it to be. I'm a writer, but I look at my two children, who are forty five. So it was this is what is behind the book. And when they were young I had a feeling Josh would always do computer work, and he has. But I thought my daughter would be a lawyer because she was so good at arguing. I kid you be lawyers, but at her graduation she told us she was going to Yale divinity school and wow, yeah, we've and then she also went to Papalu and she's a certified yoga teacher and she lives on a farm and she has five children and now she has three dwarf coats. So all of this and what happens to their friends, or what has been happening to their friends, made me think of of Hell. I wanted to show how it is when you're in your twenties and you think you've got it down, you think the hormones have sort of...

...relaxed and you know what you're going to do. You've made it through college and then and then what happens. So that was the background and that's what happens in summer love. The other thing is that mantucket is a place that people love to come to. When they come here, they want to be here. It's not like they're going to the hospital or or into a rehab or or or to work. As what anybody in an apart? Not An apartment, a skyscraper in New York. That seems to me not but I would like to do I know a lot of people like to do that, but I think with Covid we've learned a lot of people like to be in their homes. Yeah, okay, Nancy. Now summer love is a reunion story. Who Doesn't love a reunion story? Now, everybody loves the reunion story, and your last book was a family reunion. This one is about old friends and their kids and all the different ways facing who they are and what they wanted in two different generations. was there you talked about your daughter turning your expectations upside down when she decided to go to divinity school. Okay, but would you tell us if you have any idea, what was the seed for this story, for Summer Love? was there one thing, one thought, one one action that made you think this is what all right. Well, first of all, M Ka, hooray for you. I'm so excited, I'm so proud of you. Like you, it's wonderful that number five on the best seller list and I don't I have the book, but I haven't started reading it yet. I want to sort of get into a period of time when I can not be interrupted and all the rest of you. You all know I love your books and we leave you and I love your organization. I think it has changed the world for riders and it makes us all much more integrated and and communicative and sharing things. So Hooray for that. You. Thank you the same for summer. Love was probably it probably took place at the beginning of last summer or the summer before that, because even with Covid we had our our children and their grandchildren come visit our we rent a house for our daughter and her husband and we call them the thousands of children because there's always a baby crying. And but then we all get together. We have meals here and Josh comes with his partner David. They've been together for twenty years and he knows everything about technology, UM and and my daughter, sand's best friend king the year before last with her husband and her son who was fifteen, and I met Sarah when my daughter and Sarah were five years old. Oh Wow, yeah, and so now they're forty five and I've seen how their lives have changed. And I just steal...

...shamelessly from my checks. That's awesome, very great. Well, Nancy, we know you live in Antucon, that you absolutely love it, and you touched on this a little bit about, you know, just being a place where people want to be, which is so true. But what is it about mentucket that is so special to you, like, what is the magic of Nantucket and why did you choose to set this book there? I came here about thirty nine years ago to meet a friend. I've never been to nantucket and I met a man named Charlie Walters, who I had that man where the stories. Yeah, he had a record store, but he also had a television show and he used to write for rolling stall own and I was nervous about meeting this cool guy, but he's really, really nice and when he interviewed me. I might have told you all this before, but we have it on tape, so remember this was thirty nine years ago, and he said on tape microphone, do you consider yourself a woman's rider? And if anybody else had asked that I would have answered differently. But when he said that I said with you ask. Well, I am a woman, you know. And and then we sat up talking all night, just talking and verifying my friend. We got married two years later. One of the magic things about this island is that it's isolated. There's a community here, but they are all kinds of people here. There are natives whose parents founded the town. There are now there are so many. I don't know why there's so many billionaires in the world, but there's suddenly a lot of billionaires who are just buying everything here. There are the people who come to work for the billionaires. And still the town itself is very small. I know Mary Kay has been here. She was here last year, I think it was, so she yes, it's just a small town. It has a change. It has several wharfs that you can walk out on and you can look out in the distance since the the lighthouse and the ocean for the sound and the whole the whole sense of being free away from your normal life in a place of such beauty, on the beach, taking a deep breath, and I do believe that the ocean, that the waves, that the ocean gives us energy and inspiration, and I've even read that scientists say that there are ions. Yeah, I don't know what they are, but they help us feel better and they come from the ocean, I think. I think the beauty of the town and the small town feeling or what make it magic. But things are always changing, which is what I wanted to show in summer. Love. It starts off in a hot in a hotel that is the the eminent of too hotels before it, because our cultures go through...

...changes, has called the Nantucket Palace, which which is just not nantucket. We don't have any buildings over three stories high. We just don't, and so you wouldn't really have a palace. And then it got sold to somebody who called it rockers, which was when, I suppose in the S, when you were supposed to be cool and had and a safety pin in your eyebrow. I totally get that. that. Yeah, and it stars like when both trucks I guess it's going to become rockers and nothing is left except the basement, which has four bedrooms and one bathroom. My husband had his his record store, and they really were records and every summer he had people come apply for a job and the first question he would ask was to have so I started off with my four people having housing, but they they're staying in this basement of a place that is both through being demolished and restored. The Great Metaphor. Yeah, I love that. So so, Nancy. I love how this book explores the potential of the dreams we had as our younger selves and you kind of dive deep into how these characters re examine those dreams and secrets, especially Ariel the writer. So can you talk to us about this, the theme of dreams and secrets in this novel and kind of how how they've evolved over time? In other words, did you decide ahead of time that that was going to be sort of something at the center of this, or did those themes arise as you as you wrote, as you worked? I think I pretty much knew what was going to happen with three of the characters, because Nick, who ends up buying the hotel, he's such a strong personality. He starts out strong, he has ambition. He wants to do big things and what I've noticed here on them, talking with my daughter and her husband, been Josh and his husband, and all the people I've seen grow up. A lot of us get to have our dreams come true. A lot of us, if we want to be a doctor or an architect, we get to do that. So I wanted to write about people who brings will do true. That this first in my thinking. She, who is from the middle, was different and she's what I think a lot of us do, which is that the beautiful matter think she's as good as they are and she makes somebody. She falls involved with an older...

...man. That happened all the time. Then I'm talking summer everybody. That's the other thing, and summer everybody falls in love and then they fall. So I think the one person who whose dream eventually came true is Ariel, and she's a lot like I was in that when she was young, she knew she wanted to be a writer. She married a professor. I'm married a professor when I was twenty, so he was thirty six, I was twenty. He had two xwives. I thought this was really cool because I was twenty hilarious. It is. It was. It was very funny and and we had two children. And I think when I had two children I got serious about writing. I thought, Oh, now I know, but I want to write about I want to write about how hard it is to be a family, how hard it is their child to get sick. Oh hard it is if they aren't another and a child off the kindergarten and preschool. Anybody going to talk to them? I have always felt that sense of of wanting people to be happy, to have their dreams come true. That is that's not at all. That answers what it's what you're writing is about. Yeah, Nancy, thank you so much for joining us. What an absolute joy to have you on and to watch your success and to see like reading one of your books set in Nantucket is like being there. You. You're awesome and I know we share a literary agent, so later we can talk about how much we love our megally strange secrets. Yes, another one of her clients. I think it was Susan wigs who said, Oh yeah, she never talks about her other clients. She's like a Mormon husband. We don't think about the other wives, but she does talk so wonderfully about you, Nancy. So thank you for joining us and thanks Dan. Say Thank you and you. cond night everyone, and we will see next week with tea Williams and TJ Noonan and try reginning. Thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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