Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 4 months ago

SPECIAL EVENT: The Fab Five at the Nantucket Book Festival

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Five were guests at the Nantucket Book Festival in this special live event hosted by Tim Ehrenberg of Nantucket Book Partners. Tim turned the tables on MKA, Kristin, Kristy, Patti & MAM, introducing them individually with little-known bits of trivia, asking them each questions about their new books, and engaging in a fun and surprising lightning round. The show culminated in a live reading of original short stories that each of the authors wrote just for the occasion.

Welcome to Friends and Fiction. Fivebest selling authors and the stories. Novelists, mary Kay andrews, ChristineHarmel, Christie Woodson, harvey patty Callahan, Henry and mary Alice Munroare five longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their creditIn 2020, they created friends and fiction to provide author interviewsand fascinating insider, talk about publishing and writing and to highlightindependent bookstores. These friends discuss the books, they've written thebooks they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books andyou're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi everybody.My name is Tim Ehrenberg and I'm a proud board member of the NantucketBook Foundation and marketing consultant for the Nantucket BookFestival. I'm also the marketing director for Nantucket Book Partners.Nantucket's to Island bookshops, Mitchell's Book corner and NantucketBook Works and I'm the creator of Tim talks books which allows me to do funauthor talks like this. The Nantucket Book Foundation is a nonprofit thatcelebrates the voices of contemporary writers and inspires creativity andimagination in our island students. For the 2nd year in a row, our annual bookfestival has moved to an online format. Last year we produced dozens ofrecorded conversations with writers, which we called at home with authorsthat you can find on our website Nantucket Book Festival dot org. Thisyear we've chosen to host fewer conversations that we really wanted toexplore and highlight for our audiences were happy that Friends in fiction isone of those conversations that we can share with literally hundreds ofviewers around the world. Tonight's event is made possible by thegenerosity of the friends and fiction team. The five authors who you'll meetin a minute. Their leader, Megan walker and for the tech side tonight ShawnHefner, Nantucket Book festivals. Executive director, Matty jaw Elstrom,plus viewers like you. If you appreciate the wonderful authors webring to you and to our island students each year, please donate today atNantucket Book festival dot org with the link on the screen every little bithelps to continue the spread of joy to Nantucket and beyond. After all, whatthere's no greater gift than giving someone they're a gift of theirfavorite new author or book all of us at the Nantucket Book Foundation arethrilled to host the fab five Friends and fiction tonight. So without furtherado, let's meet them. I'm going to do introductions a little differentlytonight. Instead of bios you can read online or here at any event. I askedeach of them for some unique life facts. This first author married her highschool sweetheart and didn't get her driver's license until she was 21. Sheis a proud graduate of the Moss Brothers department store school ofcharm, a former journalist, she once interviewed Dr Seuss and covered thereal life murder trials that were the basis of midnight in the garden of goodand Evil for research for her novels, this author has had herself booked intojail locked in the trunk of a cadillac, rode along on a drug bust, learned tofire a shotgun and explored a hobo camp. Please welcome mary Kay Andrews. Hey, everybody so great to be with youtonight. This next author is the daughter of a preacher who'skindergarten teacher wrote on her report card books are very important toher. Her first job was at Wendy's, she was the runner up in the Miss sunburstpageant, marched with the high school band in the Orange bowl, prayed and wasa tiger at in college. She's a breast cancer survivor and once fell off amountain while hiking alone. So she's very happy to be here tonight. Sayhello to Patty Callahan, Henry. Hi everyone, I am so thrilled to be here.She's gonna fall down now. So I'm so happy to be here. We're happy to haveyou both. This author, next author was her high school prom queen and marchedthe best and snare drum in her high school marching band while in collegeshe often played Mario kart with future NFL star Javon curse. She never won.Not once, she once went on round trip cross country bus tour with sixtiesrock icon chubby checker. She was an extra in the american idol moviesstarring kelly Clarkson where she and Billy Bush played a couple at a bar.Ladies and gentlemen, Christine Harmel. Hello, thank you for having me. Thankyou know you prayer altogether. Where are you? Right now? We are in Blufftonsouth Carolina because we had an event on Tybee Island this past weekend. Andthen another event today in Bluffton. And so we have been here writing andplotting and just generally trying to stay out of trouble. Well, it doesn't,I don't know if you're doing a good job or not. This Next author is the thirdeldest of 10 Children. She speaks...

...japanese and was once involved in themassive rewrite of the encyclopedia Britannica. She's the wife of a childpsychiatrist. She's a 22 year old member of island turtle team raisesmonarch butterflies and co breeds, cavalier, king Charles spaniels. Hereis mary Alice Munro. Hello everybody. Hello gang. Nice to see you all. HelloAnd last but not least. This author grew up in two weeks, a month inManhattan and two weeks in North Carolina. She once chatted with JeffBezos at a bar and had no idea who he was. Its author. I'm starting to soundlike julie andrews in Britain. This uh sorry, she just went down, she attendedcatholic school and can still diagram the heck out of a sentence. Her firstreal date with her husband was a Dukes of Hazzard cocktail party. Pleasewelcome Christy Willson Harvey. Hi guys, I'm so excited to see all. Thanks forhaving us tim. Thank you. This is, it might sound cliche, but I feel like Iknow we've been planning this event for a while and with other things with thebookstores. I feel like I know you all and good friends already, so thank youso much for being a part of the book festival. We feel the same. Thanks forhaving us one of the top you for years. Jim you notice that you know, we weregoing to be like, he's so cute, very positive things about the pandemic is Ifeel was the friends in fiction podcast that you guys created. Um it's such ajoy to see the joy that you're bringing all your fans and you really broughtpeople together in such a time of separation. And I just wanted to saycongratulations to everything you guys did and so quickly um with everything,it's lovely thank you. So I encourage you all to comment. Those are out therewatching because at the end we'll pick a winner that will win some friends andfiction swag. So I encourage you to do that. I'm personally such a huge fan ofall of you. So thank you for being here with an antique book festival. I'mgoing to start the program with some individual questions about your 2021books. And I'm gonna start with Mary Kay Andrews whose book, the newcomercame out May 4th mary Kay Andrews. Books always come out about thebeginning of May, which is like the first glimpse of summer and they'realways just the perfect package. In my opinion, you just know you're going togo to good story. It's a no brainer that you're going to pick it up andread it mary Kay, I wanted to know where do you keep coming up with theseideas? And do you start with plot or character first? If you know, it variesfrom book to book this year. Um, the newcomers, the idea came from my editor,jen Enderlin at ST martin's press, who called me up and said, I want you towrite a fish out of a fish out of water story. And so that's where the story ofLetty and her four year old niece Maya came from. But you know, next yearstory came from somewhere totally different. So they come from everywhere. You also um oh sorry paddy CallaghanHenry. You're up next. You discussed in your podcast devoted to your book abouthow the true story in surviving savannah was begging to be told. Forthose that don't know surviving savannah is about a shipwreck pulaskithat took place. It's like the titanic of the south and being a huge, titanicbuff, I had to get my hands on this book. So can you tell us why you feelyour story was begging to be told? Mm Yeah. When I first heard about thestory, I was a little iffy about writing it because it was a shipwreckstory and it was in 1838 and I knew would require a lot of research. Sowhen I first was looking into the story and trying to decide whether I wantedto write it, I was doing some research and I was on google and this headlinepopped up and it said endurance exploration has discovered the remainsof the steamship pulaski, 100 ft deep, 30 or so miles off the coast of NorthCarolina and boom. While they're bringing up the artifacts and thetreasure and the candlesticks and the gold and the silver, I'm bringing upthe story and I felt like it was Kismet and it wanted to be told. You also discussed the idea ofemancipating the past, which I was thought was such an interesting pointin the book. Can you tell people what that means? So I wish I could claimthat phrase, but I interviewed and it's on my podcast, but also I interviewedher for the book, The woman who helps run a museum in savannah called theOwens thomas house. And when I started asking her about 1838 and about howthey kept the slave house, you know,...

...for people the tour so they could seethe truth. About 1838. She used the term emancipating the past, which toher and to me meant telling the story from every angle, not just themythological legend angle, but all the angles. And emancipating it from thiskind of mythology of the south Mary Alice Munro. You tackled theCOVID-19 pandemic in your novel the summer of lost and found I want to knowhow it was writing a book with the subject of what you are experiencing asyou were experiencing it. Um it I just would really love to know your ideas onthat. Well, it was the hardest book I wrote. I'll start right there. But mostof my books are sort of set against either an endangered species or someenvironmental issue. And in the year of the pandemic, the endangered specieswas the human being. It was us. So I what was the same? Was I when Iapproach a book with animals, I always keep my eyes and ears open and my mouthshut and I'm quiet and I observe, but for the summer of lost and found I hadto pretty much observed my life and my Children's lives, my grandchildren, thelives of the nation as we're going through this epic moment in history isa year. Like no other. What was different was that I wrote the book inreal time. I couldn't plot it out. I was living in and chronicling it day byday by day. Mhm. And in the end I have to say, I figured out what it was Iwanted to say by the end and it was hard won. But I think I have to mentionhere that Kristen came up with the Christine Harmel. I know you're therelistening. She came up with the title of the book the summer of lost andfound. And it's because I think it's perfect. Thank you kristen. But it'sbecause that year of 2020 there was a whole lot lost. But there's some reallygreat moments and memories and self realization is found. So it was anexperience and I don't think I'll ever write in real time again. Well, I'mglad we got that one at least Christie Woodson harvey on the back of yourbooks. It says the major voice in southern fiction. I think that our goodfriend Ellen wrote that. Thank you Alan, I, what I was wondering is what I'm notfrom the South. I actually have never even visited the South. So I wanted toknow that's changing. Yes, please. What is what are the components of aSouthern novel? I think when I think about Southern novels, the first thing,I think I was just that really strong sense of place where the studyingalmost kind of becomes a character in the story. But I think also one of thereasons that I really like writing about the South, not only because, youknow, I grew up here and I know about it is because of the really distinctdifferences between different generations. Most of my stories aremultigenerational and I love seeing the difference in like the protocol and theideas of, you know, people in my grandmother's generation versus peoplein my generation and how, you know, the gaps that are bridged in between whatwe hold on to what we let go of. It's also a place where people really liketo hold onto their secrets. And so and I love to write about secrets. So, um Ithink that's why I like writing it so much, but there's I think there'susually a good secret in Southern fiction. The idea of leftover embryosis a huge thing in this novel Under the Southern Sky. Oh, and I have been shownthe books, I had them already and I haven't forgot it over again. Sky Leftover Embryos um uh is a bigtopic in the book and it's kind of ripped from the headlines. I feel likethis book came out and there was so much in the news about that afterwriting this book. Have you gotten any other insight about that? And has didyour opinion change on what you feel about them? You know, it's it's sobizarre because I got the idea for this book like five or six years ago, and itwas just waiting to write it and waiting to write it. And it was like,as it was coming out, all of these stories just started erupting in themedia about these kind of news, breaking things about all these embryos,and um it felt like a really good time for the book to come out. Um but youknow, I don't know that I even have an opinion, if that makes sense. And Ihope that when readers read this book, they, I didn't want to give them anopinion, I just wanted them to think about, you know, all the different waysthat this could kind of go down. I will say, I'm really interestingly someonethat I interviewed and spend a lot of time with when I was writing this bookended up adopting out their embryos, their leftover embryos to a reallyclose friend. And I was like, oh my gosh, so like you're really closefriends, Children are going to be your...

Children with your husband, like yourbrother and your your Children's true biological brothers and sisters. And soafter that I was like, gosh, I wish I'd written the story about that. That's sointeresting. Um so many different levels you can go with that. So manydifferent places you can go. Absolutely Christine Harmel. It says on the bookflap of your brand new Forest of Vanishing Stars, that this is based onan incredible true story. And can you tell us um some research about it?Because there are so many World War Two books out there, and I feel like you'vejust nailed your last to um you tell us about the research. Well, thank you forthe compliment. Yeah, research is always a huge component of it for me,because you want to make sure you get everything right and put as much detailinto it as you can so that people really feel that that world that you'rewriting about. So for this novel, um, it's based very strongly on the reallife survival stories of jewish refugees who fled into the forests ofeastern Poland and survived the war that way. Um, and so there was a lot ofreading. There was a lot of um watching survivor testimony, things like that.But what really put a beating heart on all of these details I had assembledwas getting to speak to a man named erin Bielski, who was the youngest offour brothers who formed a survivor group In the forest. That began withjust a few family members and by the end of the war had swelled to 1200people. So there were 1200 people in a single group hiding in the heart of theforest. And Aaron who was 14 when he fled into the forest is 90 for now. Um,and so speaking with him about not only what life was like there, but what thattaught him and what that showed him in terms of a way forward for the rest ofhis life. Um, I think really brought that story alive for me. I love that.So, to my historical fiction writers, Patty and Kristen, I love this quote.It says writing about the past reveals something about the present. So, I wantto get your thoughts on that and want to know what your book survivingsavannah and forest of vanishing stars reveal. About 2021. The past echoes over and over. It'salways brought forward. We don't leave it behind its with us. It's next to us.And when we bring back historical stories, we bring it forward so we canlook at it. Maybe not repeat the mistakes, but for me, for survivingsavannah, it was about How just being human and that in tragedy, we are allhuman beings. And I really kind of nailed on the theme of surviving thesurviving and whether that is in 2021, or 1838. Once we get through something,what do we do with it then as a human? Do we make meaning out of somethingthat is meaningless or do we just get through it or do we become bitter andhard? And I wanted to look at the past as a way to deal with the future. Howabout you? You know, I think the past teaches us so much because as pattysaid, we're all humans wherever we are in time, wherever we are in the world,whatever our religious background, whatever our ethnic backgrounds, youknow, what who, whatever and whoever we are, we're people and we have things incommon across all of those separations. And so I think sometimes when you readabout the past, you read about the past with the perspective of hindsight,which makes you see the past more clearly. And I think seeing the pastclearly shows you a way forward surviving the surviving as pattymentioned, which is at the core of my story to which is funny, we've talkedabout that, that kind of there were threads running through all of ournovels. Um I think that showed us a way forward in 2020 and, you know, my books,I think always have a thread that runs through them that is about finding theability to be extraordinary within yourself, finding a way to be the lightin the darkness. And I think that's a message that we can use today, tomorrow,the day after that, because it can teach us how to be better in our dailylives from now on going forward. Yeah, it's kind of that idea that we all,everyone who's ever lived is looking at the same sun. And I think your yourthemes are just deeper into that, which I just love. So my contemporary fictionwriters, mary Kay mary Alice and Christie, what does writing about thepresent, inspire or warn us about the future, mary Alice. Do you want to take thatone? Sure. I mean, honestly, to be this is a 20 year mission of mine is to havea message and to deliver it. Uh, my novels deliver environmental lessonsevery single one of them. And clearly climate change is having and willcontinue to have such a tremendous impact on our future and the planet'sfuture. So I'm not writing nonfiction.

I use fiction to bring alive the wild,whether it's sea turtles or dolphins or birds of prey and hopefully soon whales,I bring the up close and personal. And if I do that, my readers can experiencethemselves the passion that I feel and through my characters and they makethat connection with what is wild and that is more powerful I think thananything that fiction does. I hope that they go from my novels to nonfiction tolearn more. What is the fiction that delivers that emotions? So my mantra iswhen you care, you take care. And I hope that inspires action and this isthe future that we'll just chick lit for women's fiction be treat summerreads whatever we want to call it. It's that label that I really despise in thebook business because I loved all of your books and as you can see, I'm aman. So anyone who is listening out there who might think of your books aslighter reading or whatever label that maybe some call on it. I wanted to getyour opinion on and I wanted to get something profound that you think allof your books can really have anyone relate to no matter gender, race,sexual orientation. Any of it. What something that just could it's justlike we said about human human living. Yeah, Christie. There's a big message in umyour summer book. Well, thanks. Um no, I mean I think really when I writeunder the Southern Sky, I just I think there's so many really extraordinaryand interesting ways that people create their families and they're all theright way, you know, and I think um you know what, it's core, like that'sreally what I wanted this book to be about. It's what I wanted to write astory about. And um you know, I hope the people really come away with thatmessage. And and also just, you know, the things that we do for the peoplethat we love for, the people that are our family and, you know, the secretswe keep for them, that the parts of ourselves that we give away. Um youknow, I think that's a message that everyone can relate to. Hopefully, you know, tim I have a b under, in mybonnet, under my bonnet, in my bonnet, I don't know around your body. It's init's in a, I have a feeling in my a little term chick lit. I think it'slimiting and I think it diminishes and dismisses the work of mostly womenwriters. Um, so um, you know, the only profound message um, that I want toconvey to my readers um year after year and especially with the newcomers is Iwant you to come into my world, come on in because the one guarantee that I cangive you is that you're going to have a good time and just, you know, I don't know, Ithink all of us have heard from men who kind of sidle up to us at an event andkind of a don't tell my friends, but I read your book, I really like yourbooks that has made a party the other night and it was so funny. It was likea friend. He was like, I'm actually reading the whole Peachtree Bluffseries because I really liked Under the southern Sky. It doesn't have to be asecret. You can you get in touch with your feminine side. I think like jodiPICO was on your Friends and fiction podcast and she was talking about howwhat people really mean by that label Is that a woman wrote it? And that isjust, it boggles my mind. But so you brought up your friends and fictionpodcast. That's why we're all here together. Um such an amazing feat oflike through the pandemic for you guys to do that. It's such a great show.I've watched several of them. You are amazing host. It's hilarious. You guysare very, very funny and you just bring a lot of joy to everyone on Wednesdaynight. So I wanted to maybe go through the group and say your highlight of thelast year of that podcast or so this Um I think for me we did an interview. Ihosted Charlene Harris who is an old old friend, Charlene and I have knowneach other for over 20 years. And um I read her newest book and then I youknow, we do a lot of research before we have a guest on We want we want torespect our guests and and honor them by no understanding their work and whatthey're talking about. And I had read that Charlene was a survivor of sexualassault and that happens. She has a young character in her book who wasraped. And so I did email her ahead of time. And I said, you know Charlene,you've been you've been pretty out...

...front about this, in your in yoursocial media and then you're bios. And I said, would you talk about that umduring the show? And she she said, yeah. And so she talked about the reason shewanted to be upfront about it and be vocal about is so that would give otherwomen the courage to say it's not my fault. I didn't do anything wrong andand to give other people a voice. So that wasn't for me, a really memorablenight. There's there's there's so many memorable moments somewhere. We werelaughing so hard, tears are pouring down our face and some were crying sohard, tears are pouring down our face. And what we've been astounded by is thevulnerability of our guests, right? There is a certain intimacy to onlylooking at each other on the screen. Well, what y'all don't realize is wecan only see each other. And so there have been some really profound momentsand if you're asking me one of my most memorable, I think I'm gonna choose theone where we had our very first guest and we knew that we wanted to startinterviewing other authors after five or six shows of just the five of ustalking and our very first guest was Kristin Hannah and it was a technightmare and we were talking through the phone to the screen, nothing wasworking because that wasn't working. But when we finished, not only was sheso open and absolutely beautifully honest about her struggles and aboutwriting after that episode, I had those chill bumps that said we've gotsomething here, this is the pretty special platform. And so that's one ofmy most memorable. Yeah, that's a good feeling that we'vegot something here, feeling um Gosh, so many and they were like 20 fighting forposition. But when you say that when you said that, I thought, I do have tosay it's Nantucket and um, we I mean when Ellen came onto my launch and itwas so funny tim because um the character that she was playing in mylaunch script had passed away, so you see her through her journal entries umin this story and so we joked with Alan the whole time like, oh, make sure yousound like you're from the Great Beyond Well she was in ST john and theinternet was down, she was doing it from her phone and you could hear herbut she sounded like she was coming from a million miles away, like this isreally, really perfect. Yeah, it's amazing. You know, for me, I think oneof the things, I'm sorry, let's go ahead, you're on your immune and maryAlice, You did go ahead chris okay. So for me, youknow, I'm just at the tail end of about two weeks of book tour for the ForestVanishing Stars, which is, you know, my first opportunity in a year and a halfreally to get out on the road and see people. And I know this isn't exactly amoment from the show, but it's a moment related to the show because I have beenastounded and moved to tears by the number of people. And I know we've allnow had this experience because we've all gotten out there and gotten to talkabout our books, the number of people who come to our events who raised theirhands when we say, are you a member of Friends and fiction and the people whocome up to you afterwards and say that it meant something to them or it helpedthem through the pandemic or it gave them something to look forward to on aWednesday night or now that the pandemics over. They hope we continuedoing it because they found a place where they feel like they belong andwhen they're part of a family and every single time someone has said that tothem, I look into their eyes and I listen, I never want to forget whatthat means and how special that is that we have this community with us. We'rewe're so fortunate they're coming and thanking us. But were the words of mywife and we don't forget that for a second. It was uh that's so true. Itreally is. And in that same kind of vain. I was going to say that it's whateveryone doesn't see. The green room before the show when Sean is uh Seanfirst of all Sean humor, his little he has oh my gosh, so funny. But it'sbefore the show when the guest comes in and you have that 15 minutes to a halfhour and after we do our sound checks and we're just talking. You see,there's a change, there's a shift that happens where an author who might benervous or or die or unsure. The personalities. We all start talking andliking one another. And by the time the show actually starts and we bring theauthor back on, she's much more free and I find don't you all that sometimeswe get different, more depth, more in depth answers than I've seen ininterviews with that same author...

...elsewhere. Because it's the nature ofthe relaxed atmosphere of women talking friends, and men and women talking. Butin my favorite event it goes from okay, we have to say it. I was supposed to bethe host of an event, but my daughter got married so I had to cut out, youknow when your daughter gets married, you you should show up and it was oh mygosh, Karin slaughter and no one was quite prepared for her humor. She is ahooch. We should have known when she appeared with a pirate hat on her headwith a parrot on her shoulder. That was our first clue. But the conversationwas just so funny and I only got to see it as a, as a viewer afterwards and Icould see, I think it was her comments and the expressions of patty christianand crispy was just sort of an open mouth deadpan. What, what did she justsay? What happened now? Talking about pirates and parent healthcare? It'swhat kept you on your toes. That's what it would be like, wait, is she like, isthis real? It was hilarious. It was in a few f bombs too. So it was, it wasgreat. And I was about to go to our website Friends of Fiction dot com,y'all and take a look. Yeah, I missed that one. So I will definitely be waywe're going to have Karen, we're going to have Karen on again in august way.Yeah, We don't know what costume drama will be enacted. We might have to takethis way. We turn the tables on her. We should show up way I have a piratecostume by the way again about Friends in fiction truly. It's such an amazing,amazing place for so many readers and writers. So now we're gonna move on tothe next part of the program, which is always my favorite thing to do withauthors. It's the lightning round where I ask questions and then you five canjust first thing that comes to mind um fire out your answer. So, are you guysready? Yeah, we're ready. Okay. Favorite book when you were young, Matilda. All right, Good Garden. Theborrowers Diary of Anne frank, Little House on the Prairie. I love all ofthose favorite books so far this year. You know, mind tim I bet you can guesswith the end of the End. Yeah, I think mine is The Sweeney Sisters by LianDolan. A quiet book troubled the water by Rebecca Dwight bro. If we had her onour podcast a and the women of chateau Lafayette by Stephanie dre was veryyeah, I just finished it to. Maybe it's what's on my mind. But I loved Mallabyrising Taylor Jenkins, Reid I'm great with an audio book now. So good in theend it is really good. Yeah, August 11. Yeah. Yeah. You're for the rest of yourlife you only get one book you can read over and over and over again. What isit? It's an easy answer for me. I've been reading it every year. It's theshell seekers by Rosamond culture, wow, so interesting. Yeah. Mine's a treegrows in Brooklyn Betty smith. That's good. I've heard me say that it's myfavorite guest. I think mine is I feel bad about my neck by Nora Ephron. Yesthey apply to everything. Yes and she's hilarious. I keep reading this. Howabout you? I think Rebecca. Oh such a good one. Yeah, that's a good one. Minewould be the collected works of all mythology ever written which isn't areal book. Oh thanks. Every night you read that you treated your out. Okay.Friends and Fiction are having a dinner party and it's a party of 11 becauseobviously I will be coming. Each of you can invite one person living or dead.Who are they? This is always such a hard one because it changes. But Ithink for me to be Pat Conroy, I miss him in real life and he was a greatraconteur. So yeah pet. Um I would say Joy David Hman because Ihave spent the past seven years either researching her writing about her,we're talking about her so be pretty cool to sit down with her and have amartini with an olive in it. Damn it. Damn it. I win. Well it's not a showain't over yet. Okay who's next? I...

...guess I am. I would love to be sittingat the round table at the Algonquin and sitting right beside I like then Iwould invite Dorothy Parker and she definitely puts a twist in my martini.Uh enjoy it would be best friends. Yeah, okay, so I would invite jesus if Icould because why would you not invite jesus to your dinner party? Right. LikeI don't imagine there's a lot he has to say. But no I would probably ask ErnestHemingway because um I feel like the stories would be amazing. He wouldbring the best booze probably and some fish probably having girl which wouldbe right up your alley is his favorite champagne, supposedly you know he mightspend a lot of dinner insulting us, but at least he would do it eloquently andmemorable simply and brutally pass quickly and we would marvel at thebeauty of the insults. So how about you? Um this, I mean this might not beinteresting for everyone else, but I would invite my great grandmotherbecause I never got to meet her and she was a fascinating character who I willbe writing about one day. So you will get to learn about her too. But um whojust did some really extraordinary things for the time in which she lived.And I would love to see her. I love that, wow, that's going to be a crazydinner party. Right. She would, I feel like she would be all about meetingjesus. Yes, jesus. I hope she's met jesus. I hope to favorite literary,who's doing the seating plan for that dinner tim? I'll put it together. Okay,thank you. Wait, who's doing the menu? Will there be some olive topping thatYes, we will make sure to have that in there for you. All of us are going tobe part of that part now. Favorite literary quote. Uh Well, the I we weretogether talking about that and I came up with this quote and there are somany variations of it. But the one I like the best is from Red smith wholike me is a former journalist. Well he's a dead journalist now, but he saidthat jesus, I what hopes what only helps It was a sportswriter. So maybenot. I don't know. Uh Smith said writing is easy. You just sit down at atypewriter and open a vein. Uh Yeah, that's what I do not have a favoriteliterary quote because I just pause and appreciate when something strikes me acertain way. So I'm going to tell you the last line that struck me, it was inthe book, razor blade tears which I listen to an audiobook and I spit outwhen I was drinking and around it it says it's someone describing a womandriving up behind him expired a silver BMW in the rear view mirror driven by awoman with the most severe I want to speak with the manager haircut he'dever seen. She zipped by them doing at least 30 MPH, like she had somedalmatians in the trunk that she needed to make into a coat. And I thought thatis the best description of the woman I've ever heard in my entire life. S aCosby razor blade tears will be a guest on our uh it is, I have this on mybulletin board at home. It's one of my favorite quotes. It's by poet andphilosopher named David White and it says I'm going to read it becauseotherwise I'll mess it up. What would it be like to start a conversation withmyself that my future self would thank me for, what would it be like to becomethe saintly ancestor of my future happiness idea of being ancestor of myown happiness when I'm trying to make a decision is really fascinating to me.Just picked up would have been, it would have been a better, it would havebeen better, but mine was mind actually, I, I didn't know what I was gonna sayand then I was walking on the beach day and just popped into my head and I waslike uh the world is hers for the reading uh oh that's a great one uhminus one that I actually just found while I was writing the Summer Lost andfound and it's pretty obvious why it struck home and it's by thorough and itsays you must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, findyour eternity in each moment. There is no other life. But this, that, that'sbeautiful. I love people's quotes. Okay, so you're happy place. The beach. Yeah, but from where I live, it's myfavorite love it. I think for me, um...

...sitting on a sandy beach on the gulf ofMexico, watching one of those technical or gulf sunset with a glorious glass ofchardonnay in my hand and maybe my husband at my side, maybe I love you,maybe cork my own wine bottle. So I need him. Okay for me it's eithersnuggled up putting my little five year old to sleep or paris paris alwaysparis paris Megan, olive, paris eating olives. There was a bar there, I likethat serves little marinade at all. The, the idea that makes me so happy isbeing surrounded by people I love at the end of a really productive full dayand sitting around a table like we're doing right now and just laughing sohard and whatever happened that day, the people you love around you, it'sjust kind of melting away. That's nice, nice moment. Tell us something yourfriends here might not know about you. I hate olives like a lot I do and likeyou can't sneak them into something. I will know if there is a trace of olive out, fascinating Christie, absolutelyfascinating. I play, I play or have played pretty weird instruments likethe french horn and the japanese, Okamoto. Oh, I can sing every word tobilly Joel's italian restaurant. I everyone good vibrations. There you go,wow, hmm. Well mine is that um I like to write in the sunlight and so Ifollowed the sun around my house with my laptop like a cat, so I'll turn tothe window seat that offered here. But I need I really I'm a leo I really haveto have sunlight for my maximum happiness of in writing. I did not knowthat. Okay, so your pseudonym and I changedto make it a little bit more literary because usually this is like your stagename, but it's your first pet. And the street you grew up on. All right, Mine and we already talkedabout this one time town. So mine is fluffy Marion. Good. So good. That sucha stripper name, not totally stripped is not a stripper name.That's what he meant. So mine would be terrible if I gave you my real answer,which is my first thought was dr spots. He was a Dalmatian. It grew up on with74th circle. So dr spot 74th circle doesn't really do anything. My secondpet and the first street I lived on and then I would be caught until CountryClub would totally read that book. Cut. Oh my God that's a rapper name. You putlittle cottontail, whatever that is. You have a rapper name. God what thenext minus rascal dogwood. I love that one. Country singer singer. It's acountry singer. Yeah actually mind. Sounds pretty good. My next I mineactually I could use its lily and kettle birth lily, kettle like mystery. Really lovely. Now a lotof minus Moussi, serpentine lucy. Yes and you are getting your Children'sauthor actually. It's a good Children. It'sgonna suck. It sounds like a saturday morning cartoon show. Oh serpentine. Ohmy gosh. What? Right up there in the big chair. What's your next book aboutgreatly writing it or if one is coming out in the winter. What is, what is itabout? Christine? Don't go around the circleup there. Sure. My next one is christmas and Pete Street love. It'sthe fourth book in my Pizzeria Bluff series. Um, and super briefly, it isabout some of my beloved Peachtree Golf characters get stuck in Peachtree Bluffduring the storm of the century and it is up to the ones who have alreadyevacuated to rescue them and rebuild the town just in time for christmas patty. Okay. Um, my next book is calledonce upon a wardrobe and it is set in...

...1950 England and is uh, adventurebetween a little boy and his sister as they try to discover the origins ofNarnia and mine is called the santa suit. Andit's about a young woman who buys up falling down old farmhouse and shediscovers on the top of a closet. Um, a beautifully made santa suit with a notewith a plaintiff note from a child asking Santa to bring her daddy homefrom the war. And that will be out September 28. My next one, I'm only about 1/5 of theway into writing it. It will be out next July it's not a title yet, but itis a return to World War II France. It's about two mothers to daughters. Anallied bomb that falls where it shouldn't a family ripped apart. Andthen a storyline in 1960 New York. Mhm. Well, mine actually is coming outin june and it's a middle grade book. It's following The Islanders, which ismy first middle grade book came out last june and it's called The IslandersTreasure Hunters. And it's really a sweet story. These three kids returnedto this island where there is no elect, no cars, no stores, just nature. Andfor these kids, no wifi. And in this first one the Children became friends.They got to know each other. But the little boy was really concerned aboutwhat was happening to his dad was injured in Afghanistan and he had losthis leg. So that was the story of book one and book two is a continuation ofthat. They're going to return to diabetes, which is a real island. Andsearch for this apparently black beards pirate treasure is truly supposed to beburied somewhere on Dewey's. And of course kids are going to look for thattreasure. But it's also the father son relationship. Uh PTSD father withtrying to be a dad, play with his son while learning to live with a new leg.And so the treasure is also, you know the double Anton dra of a father sonrelationship. Well, I can't read, wait to read all five of them. Thank you.Okay, so now the part of the program that I'm most excited about, we askedyou to come up with original Nantucket stories that you guys have decided tocall fairy tales and they're all linked because they start very on the way toNantucket Island um for a magical day, so I can't wait to hear these. Um and Ithink we're going to start with mary Ellen. Yes. And it's only, it's gonnabe short three minutes and I'm starting out because I wrote the only nonfiction of the fairy tales because sometimes the truth is funnier andstranger than fiction. So it's my visit to Nantucket. My first visit toNantucket began with one phrase no Voyager ever wants to hear. We lostyour luggage. I was on book tour thrilled to be attending the NantucketBook Festival luncheon. We knew this tour schedule was tight, but no oneplanned on the thunderstorm. I endured a miserable 24 hours of canceledflights, hired cars, a long drive from Portland Rhode island to high anus,massachusetts and no sleep. But somehow I made it to the ferry in time. Iwalked onto the island, grinning, feeling the salt scented breeze andcaught my first glimpse of the fabled gray shingles and colorful flowers. Ispite acquaint shop on Old South Worf and in the window, the most beautifulnavy knit suit. It screamed Nantucket. Remember I was wearing the same clothesfor 24 hours. So I made a beeline for peter Englund and carry Englandexclaimed. The suit fit like it was made for me. I laughed and thought,yeah, and it's clean. He was also the most expensive suit I've ever purchasedand it was worth every penny. I felt confident and excited when I walkedinto the beautiful Nantucket Yacht club for a luncheon with Nantucket Bookfestival. A dark haired, lovely woman with a gracious smile, walked up andintroduced herself as nancy fair. Of course I knew this iconic author ofNantucket. I'd read all her books, loved her writing style, so it didn'tsurprise me that we became fast friends. The luncheon was a great success. NancyMichael talked for hours still. Afterwards we got word from theairlines that my luggage was still missing. Nancy took me under her wing.Let's go shopping! She said, Oh, the streets of Nantucket, a shopper'sparadise. We laughed as we walked along...

...the hydrangea and flower laden streets.One more charming than the other from t shirts to oh, criteria the shopsinvited us to browse nancy guided me to her favorite stores, many of them longterm family businesses. One our first stop was zero main where I was thrilledthat enclosed like in books, we have the same taste. Next went to Murray'sto Hungary for the famous Nantucket red casual clothes. Nancy told me if a manis wearing faded red trousers, we know that he's been coming to the island fora long time. I longingly appeared in the windows of the whaling museum as wepassed and promised myself to visit. Later. We were on a mission. A cashmereshawl shoes, even a hat. Nancy took me to book works, a companions door toMitchell's filled with Children's toys and clever gifts. He was a thrill tosee my books in their window. As a guest of the festival. We ended ourshopping trip at Nancy's house where we sat on her comfy sofa, drink martiniswith yummy olives and talked to her handsome husband charlie aboutconversation of the seas conservation of the seas and the creatures who livein them. My luggage arrived two days later in time to board the ferry home.I had to buy a second suitcase for all my new clothes. Thinking that perhapslosing my luggage while in Nantucket turned out to be a stroke of good luck.I found a window seat and as the big engine started and we headed out to seaon the ferry, I felt akin to the whalers I learned about at the whalemuseum. Farewells on the docks were sad, emotional times. A whaling voyage couldlast from 2 to 4 years. I looked out at the sea and as the very headed towardsDiana's, I hoped it would not take me that long before I returned to thecharming island. Like no other. No. Alright, okay. My story is all total fiction andI call it the tail that wags the dog. Take a flop down on the seat in thegray ladies cabin. She put Simba's kennel at her feet and dug in her toebag, that god awful, neon pink tote bag with the cheery hashtag Ryan and Rory'sBig Day logo brought out her sunglasses and adjusted them over her bloodshoteyes. She leaned her head back, already regretting this idiotic plan of hersister in law, Billy to return to Nantucket to watch her ex husband marrya 22 year old toddler coffee, she muttered, Must have coffee. On a returnfrom the snack bar. She was startled to see a stranger sitting in thepreviously vacant seat next to hers, cradling Simba in his arms the siegethe shih szu lulled on the man's shoulder, licking his chin and ears.Excuse me? She lifted her glasses so he could see the outrage in her eyes. Whatare you doing with my dog? He was whining and barking. The stranger said,I just, thanks, I'll take him now. Talia's said Isil E, Okay, wow, you'rewelcome. The man chuckled and handled over the wriggling dog who promptlyfell asleep in her lap. Talia pretended to nap for the first half of the trip,but she was vividly aware of the man beside her. He was undeniablyattractive, maybe mid forties. His hair was sun bleached and he had intriguingcrow's feet raiding out, radiating out from gray green eyes. He was dressed infaded khaki shorts and his long legs stuck out into the aisle. So you'reheaded to Ryan and Rory's wedding too, huh? He asked, pointing to the tote bagmaybe. What about you? Oh yeah. Kind of a command performance. He stuck out hishand and she felt it would be rude to turn away. I'm paying Italia. How doyou know the happy couple? He asked you first. He smiled. It was a nice smile,genuine. I'm the bride's former stepfather. Get out. Tell you saidafraid. So your turn? I was married to Ryan until a year ago. Ouchi said so.Ryan's what? So worries what half his age? The exact age of our daughter,Talia said. And they invited you to the wedding? Interesting. Actually, Ryan'ssister, Billie invited me. She has a sick sense of humor and she absolutelyloathes your stepdaughter, ex stepdaughter. And that makes two of us.I'm afraid. If you dislike Rory, why go to her wedding? He shrugged. Her newstepfather is my brother Patrick. I haven't seen him in a while. Tanyaraised one eyebrow. Your mother, your brother married your ex. Isn't thatcozy? Lori likes cozy and now she won't have to throw out all those monogrammedtowels. We got his wedding gifts. No hard feelings. Right. Anyway, they bookme a room at the white elephants. So here I am now. Talia raised anothereyebrow. As it happens, I'm staying at...

...the White Elephant too. You stillhaven't told me why you're actually going to this wedding loan at theawkward. I certainly hope so, she said. Pain nodded sympathetically. On animpulse, he reached out and patted her hand. It gets better, you know, to you,looked out the window. They were coming into the harbor, the fog had cleared,and the sky was a brilliant blue seagulls swooped low over the water.The ferry dock was within sight, and Nantucket in all its summer glory wasunfurled before her. Suddenly the gray merc that had settled over her souldissolved, and for the first time since the divorce, she felt her spiritslighten. She turned and gave her companion her most dazzling smile. Youknow? I think it just has. She hesitated, her heart pounding, but thenplunged ahead. You wouldn't want to have a drink tonight, would you? At thehotel? I was just gonna ask you the same thing. He said. Dinner too. Unlessyou already have plans. Simba stirred. He sat up, looked around and yawnedmadly. Wave, wagging his fluffy white tail. Dinner would be lovely to yousaid. Yeah, okay, so mine is kind of a continuation, but from a differentcharacters. You point July 777 was supposed to be Lula's lucky day. It washer birthday, for Heaven's sake only from her delayed flight to her popsflip flop to almost missing this ferry. It hadn't been lucky, not at all. Shedragged her pink tote bag. One strap had broken in the airport across thefloor of the Nantucket ferry and willed herself to take a deep breath, savorthe breeze and appreciate the silver lining. She was getting an all expensespaid trip out of this sham of a wedding. She scanned the boat, looking for aseat when her eyes stopped on a pink tote that bore the same hideousinsignia as hers. Hashtag right and Rory's Big day. She looked up to seetwo people and a dog. She knew well. Talia pain Simba! What in the world areyou doing here, then? Oh, God tell you you weren't going to object orsomething, are you? Her former stepmother laughed so hard, lulu wasafraid she had stopped breathing when she stood up and hugged her. Tell youlooked well. She looked great, especially for someone who's ex husbandwas marrying a 22 year old. Oh honey, no offense, But I'm so happy. Yourfather is £190 of someone else's problem now. Even my formerstepdaughters pain. Said, hugging lula now too. And just think, he said withfaux wistfulness, we were all at the parents cocktail where they met theunlikely trio laughed. Tell you gasped. Oh, lula! Happy birthday honey lularolled her eyes. Yeah, thanks. I guess my gift is my best friend, becoming mynew stepmother. Well, honey, all I can say is it probably won't last long pain.Tried to hide his laugh behind his hand. I'm sorry, he said. I think we have tolaugh to keep from crying. Right, lula smart, yep, I'll be the maid of honor,laughing all the way down the aisle. The ferry was nearing the wharf andlula was already dreading dragging her busted tote. Are you guys staying atthe way? I want it? No, the white elephant, Talia said, lula could havesworn she and pain shared a knowing smile. Well, good for Talia of all oflula stepmothers. Talia had been her favorite. If only her father had feltthe same way. Only a few minutes later, she was getting off the shuttle andpassing her rolling suitcase and wedding tote to a bellman. I'll comeback to check in, she said. I'm going to go walk around. She pointed at hertote. If that disappeared into the sea, it wouldn't be the worst thing lula,despite her terrible mood, found herself charmed by Nantucket, envelopedin her sea breezes and sun glinting off the water. She ambled down to theNantucket marina, noticing the yachts and sailboats, center consoles andfishing boats. A guy who looked to be about her age was tying a rope to acleat so quickly and expertly she couldn't look away, his hair fallingover his forehead, just so when he stood up in his polo with the boatbasin logo, she realized she was staring. He was the perfect mix ofNantucket, preppy and surfer cool that made her practically swoon. He looksfamiliar like she had seen him somewhere or maybe even read him in abook. He still hadn't noticed her. Excuse me, she said. He looked up andsmiled with a row of teeth so straight and white they almost blinded her. Hewas beautiful. She had a rule against dating men prettier than she was, butit was her birthday and her father was marrying her friend. Help you? He asked.Well, it's just that it's my first trip to the island and I was looking forsomewhere to get a drink. He looked down at his watch. I'm off work now.How about I show you around the island? She shot him her winningest smile, Theone that got her term paper extensions. Oh, wow. That is so nice of you. Ican't think of anything better than a tour from a real local. Maybe we cangrab a drink at the chicken box. The chicken box. Trust me, you'll love it.I'm linked by the way he said, blessing. Well, yes, yes, he was. His arm brushedhers as they made their way down the dock. And just like that her entire dayturned around july 7th was lucky once again, it's great. Alright, we're onthe same ferry. Mine is called a whale...

...of a story with museum curator. EverlyWinthrop from surviving savannah. Sea spray flew over the side of theNantucket, high speed ferry rails and Everly went through up, wobbled in herraffia raft wedges, juggled her ships of the sea, overstuffed tote bag andslid just before she hit the deck, one leg heading east and one west. A manreached out and grabbed her elbow, guided her to the railing, passed awoman with a little white yapping dog and an obnoxious hot paint tote bag.Thank you, she said, embarrassed. I am ill prepared at best, ill prepared, heasked. These shoes. These white pants. The bag. No. Dramamine! She groaned.Nausea, rose with the swell of the sea. Stare at the horizon. Everyone told herthat's the cure. They were wrong, seasick, he asked. She glanced at himnow. A man with kind eyes behind rimless glasses, a grade baseball caplow on his forehead. He wore a blue rain slicker and a grin of amusement.I'm not good at sea travel. Just see history. She's dead. She stopped. Shedid not need to tell this stranger about her job and her goals inNantucket. Your job is see history? He asked, boring. She stared at thehorizon. The water furrowed with white caps, the sea pinky and dark, mostlyshipwrecks. How could shipwrecks be boring? He asked. Oh, they are not atall. I just meant that you don't want to hear about my job. Sure. I do have abit of interest in shipwrecks myself. Well, she paused, but he seems so eagerand interested and he kept her from falling hard onto the deck. But he wasprobably the kind of guy who only knew about the titanic. I need to borrow afew pieces from the Whaling museum for my Maritime Museum in Savannah. Butthey're ignoring me. She shook her head with frustration. I have no idea whatis wrong with them. Rude if you ask me with shipwreck? He asked. You'veprobably never heard of it. The essex, the essex, you say a whaling ship, shesaid it was the inspiration behind Moby Dick. It took three months, threeentire months to find any survivors. And there she went, as she tended to dowhen talking about history, on and on and on about a shipwreck and a whaleand survivors and the tragedy of it all. The poor man's eyes glazed overNantucket came into view linen white clouds spread over gray shingled houseshuddled together facing the sea, Siegel's sky dancing. They were bothsilent as the ferry eased into the wharf and came to a stop. Horn,offering a loud howl of arrival as he took his lead. She was embarrassed ofher nonstop shipwreck chatter. It was lovely meeting you, he said, and pausedfor her name Everly, she said. I hope you get what you came for on thislittle gray lady on the sea. He walked away before she could ask his name. Thewhaling museum sat like a brick jewel in the middle of town. Everly walkedthrough the front door with an air of assurance. She could not fail. Sheheaded straight for the overlooked gallery where the essex exhibit lived,with its oil paintings, ship models and etchings. A huge poster dominated theleft wall advertising a book about the Disaster in the Heart of the sea, thetragedy of the whale ship essex by Nathaniel Philbrick. A man stood infront of the ship model and Everly eased her way around him, grabbing hercamera from her bag. He turned the man from the ferry, his blue rain slickerdraped over his arm, his baseball cap gone and his smile the same. Hello?Everly? She paused. What was he doing here? I'm not Philbrick in the heart ofthe sea, she said, red rising to her hairline. I hear you'd like to borrowsome of these artifacts for museum display. Oh, you heard that somewhere,did you? She asked. He laughed and together they turned to stare at thelone piece of twine that survived the essex disaster. An emblem of Nantuckethistory. Okay, okay. Mine stars. Anne who was the 12 year old daughter in thesweetness of forgetting my 2012 book, which, so now she's in her earlytwenties and that book took place...

...partially on Cape Cod. And um now hermother has opened another bakery on Nantucket. So the wind whipped Annie'shair as the ferry steamed across Nantucket sound toward the wharf, sheclosed her eyes and breathed in the ferry, pulled slowly into Nantucket andAnne followed the crowd off the boat. As she hurried up broad Street, shefound herself slowing to a stop and lingering in front of the tantalizingwindows of Nantucket Book works. Her favorite place on the island, one ofthe home stores of authors such as Nathaniel, Philbrick, nancy fair andAnne's personal favorite, Elin Hilderbrand. While Annie's classmatesin paris where she was getting her master's in creative Writing, toiledaway on novels that compared to the 20th century masters, Anne had justcompleted her first book set on Cape Cod. She dreamed of being to the Capewhat Ellen was to Nantucket, but that was silly. That's what her classmatesand professors told her anyhow, they rolled their eyes at her and said thatif you weren't striving to win a Pulitzer or a national book award, itwasn't worth writing at all. She rounded the corner onto Center Streetand the familiar sign of the North Star bakery, the third branch of hermother's bakery originally founded on Cape Cod came into view and he went inanne her mom hope, rushed around the counter from the back and pulled Annieinto a tight hug, honey, before you get settled, her mom said, pulling away, Ineed you to make a delivery. Seriously, you're putting me to work already. Itshouldn't take long. It's a cake, it's all ready to go. She grabbed a whitebox on the counter tied with blue ribbon. It's going to Nantucket. BookWorks. Ask for tim tim, Ehrenberg, anne squeaked as in tim talks books, buthe's like famous. Well he's like waiting, her mother replied, tappingher watch, See you when you get back, sweetie perplexed. And he headed out ofthe bakery and down the street to the bookstore. Inside. It smelled likefresh ink, crisp pages and endless stories. Annie made her way to thecounter where her heart thudded when she saw tim He was like a rock star toher cake, she managed to say, holding up the box, Tim laughed. You must beHope's daughter, ANne. He began to walk, leading her to a door in the back ofthe store. He pushed it open and gesture for her to go in. She's waitingfor you, ANne was about to ask who, but there was no need for as she enteredthe room she saw her. It was Elin Hilderbrand sitting right there signingautographs. Anne, Ellen said, rising from her chair. I've been expecting you,me and he asked, and then promptly she dropped the cake splashing sound as itfell, and anne knew immediately it had been ruined. She looked up in horror.I'm so sorry, she said. I dropped your cake, but Ellen didn't look madactually. You dropped your cake, she said. And when Ellen gave her a puzzledlook, Ellen crossed from behind your signing table, bent to the box andopened it. She gestured inside. And when Annie dared look, her jaw dropped.Yes, the cake and olive oil cake. Her favorite had been reduced to a pile offrosted bush, but the words written across the top were still visible.Congratulations on your book, love, Mom. The cake said, Your mom told me aboutyou and the way your classmates and professors have been treating your work.Ellen said, look, I see a bright career ahead of you, Annie. And I never wantedyou to let other people's opinions shape the way you see yourself. Sothank you. Anne managed well, don't just stand there. Ellen said, grab afork. She pulled two out of her pocket, handed one over and winked. Okay, Annie,tell me about this book of yours slowly, hesitantly. Annie began. Her heartlifting is Ellen ate cake and nodded along, asking questions here and there.Maybe one day Annie would be the one in this back room, signing books, making ayoung writer feel inspired. Maybe one day tim would be posting about Anne'sbooks but day today, this was enough. Today. This was everything today. Shecould see a future stretching before her. Beautiful and bright as aNantucket afternoon. Yeah, we're amazing. I think you said you'republishing houses were on this call. So do we have some book deals? Because Iwas like, I really want YMCA to write a book about italian about remember whatthat was fun. So much fun. Thank you for taking the time to do that. I feellike since we still weren't able to get you guys to Nantucket um this was a wayto, to have that within this virtual event, so thank you for writing those.It was a fun challenge. It was fun. Yeah, it was really fun. So Kristen Iwanted to hand it over to you and a couple of words about Friends andfiction. Um you know, I know a lot of you here tonight are with us already onFriends and fiction, but those of you who aren't we really hope you'll joinus, it's a community for book lovers and if you love stories and you'reinterested in the writing world and you...

...find us there, you will have come tothe right place, as we say in our, in our opening. Um you know, we have agreat schedule coming up tomorrow night, we are hosting Vanessa Riley, we haveChristina, baker klein the week after and our fall schedule over the nextmonth or so, month or two includes Karin Slaughter, Emily, Henry, TaylorJenkins Reid and lots and lots of other amazing special guests. It's a greatplace to be. You can interact with other book lovers um and we really dostrive to put on the best live show we can every Wednesday night at seven andto send you podcasts as well um that can entertain you in the meantime. Sowe hope you'll join us, Friends and fiction. You can find us on facebook umand we are also on Youtube and wherever you can find your podcasts. Thank you.So, one other thing we wanted to tell you about is that mary Kay andrews andChristie Woodson harvey and I all have books coming out in september andoctober. You heard us talk about them earlier in the show and we partneredwith Nantucket Book Partners and with Tim for what we are calling a winterWonderland subscription. You can get all three books when you subscribe tothis package. And not only will you receive signed first editions of eachbook, right when they come out, but also a friends in fiction, mob mug mugmug. It's a long night friends like this, but it's got a handle. And it's afriends of fiction, but also some really exclusive content that we'vemade only for TIM and the Book Partners. And this package, it includes a videowe all took together to talk about the secrets behind this book and you get aQR code to watch it. You get a book club kit made just for thissubscription box and we're really excited about it. So if you go to theNantucket Book Partner's website, you will find it right there. And I want tothank all three of you so much because in this day and age to help anindependent bookstore like that, we appreciate it because you, it's allabout finding the things that people can't find anywhere else. And this istruly something that that you can't get anywhere else. And we really appreciateyou coming to us with this idea and I'm doing it. We can't, we can't thank youenough for, you know, supporting the independent booksellers has been a partof our mission from the very beginning. So every week we partner with adifferent independent bookstore and and ask our viewers to um, order booksthrough them and they do which is always great news and I want toannounce our giveaway winner. So it's good time. So our winner is JanetCatlett, I think I'm saying that right from nobles full indiana. Socongratulations Janet and you get your bag right out to you. Yeah, I want tothank our audience tonight who support makes the Nantucket book festivalsprogramming possible, whether online or in person, you can follow us on socialmedia at Nantucket Book Festival. And Nantucket Book Festival is happy to behosting a few in person events on Nantucket in august in september. Andso we're really looking forward to welcome mean back live audiences to our10th anniversary Nantucket Book Festival, june 16th through the 19th,2000 and 22. If you like tonight's event and want to support our nontextbook festival endeavors, please consider a donation. Like I said, anyamount helps us to continue our efforts to spread the joy of reading toNantucket and beyond visit Nantucket Book festival dot org. For moreinformation. Ladies, thank you so much for joining me tonight. I had so muchfun. I hope all your viewers had fun. Sorry, went a little over, but I thinkit was worth it and I just like I said, such a big fan of all of you and thankyou for being here at the Nantucket Book Festival. Thank you. It waswonderful. It was so fun. Thank you. Happy reading everyone. Bye. Thank youfor tuning in, Join us every week on Facebook or YouTube where our live showairs every Wednesday night at seven p.m. eastern time. And please subscribeto our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here. Mm yeah.

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