Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 2 years ago

Sunday Bonus Episode: Holiday Cooking with Nathalie Dupree

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

James Beard Award-winning author of 15 cookbooks, Nathalie Dupree, joins the Fab Five to discuss how food and stories go hand-in-hand, her legacy as a "connector," clever entertaining hacks, and who she'd invite to her fantasy dinner party. http://www.nathalie.com/

Welcome to Friends and fiction. Five best selling authors, Endless Stories, Friends and Fiction is a podcast with five best selling novelist whose common love of reading, writing an independent bookstores found them together with jets, author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. Thes friends discuss the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Bestselling novelist Mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books. To their credit at the Start of the Pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour to talk about their books, their favorite bookstores writing, reading and publishing in this new, uncharted territory. They're still talking, and they've added fascinating discussions with other bestselling novelists, so join them live on their friends and fiction Facebook Group page every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Eastern, or listen and view later at your leisure. Welcome everybody Monday, our monthly bonus episodes, which means it's time for friends and fiction. Five best selling authors, endless stories I'm Mary Kay Andrews, and I'm hosting our guest, Nalley. Dupri. My forthcoming novel, The Newcomer, will be out from ST Martin's Press on May. I Am Christine Harmel, and my next novel, The Forest of Vanishing Stars, will be out July 6th from gallery books. I'm Christi Woodson Harvey and my next book, Under the Southern Sky, will be out April 20th. I'm Paddy Callaghan, Henry, and my new novel comes out on March 9th, and it is called Surviving Savannah and hello, I'm Mary Alice Munro and my new novel than that. The Summer of Lost and Found is out May 11th, and as I've already mentioned are, Wait, Did I forget somebody? No e Behind the scenes people that E. Depres, whose latest book book is Natalie pre favorite stories and recipes and Natalie is the James Beard Award winning author of 15 books. She's also started more than 300 television episodes, but the network Yes Learning Channel, her bestselling book, New Southern Cooking, started entire culinary movement. She's won James Beard awards for Southern memories and comfortable entertaining, as well as as as well as Natalie Depres. Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking, which is kind of the Bible now writes for The Charleston Post and career and does short videos for them as well as occasionally for other publications. Her husband, Jack Bass, is the author of nine books on the American South, and since we are talking about books and bookstores, this week's indie bookstore is boxed in books and Charleston. The owner, Polly Buxton, has said she had only one dream since she was in her late teens to create a bookstore in downtown four of them that supported the writing and reading community, a place that stimulated creativity and conversation. This week, Must in Books is offering a 10% discount on books by by our guest, Nalley, as well as by the five friends and fiction authors with the code Friends Fiction. Um, you'll find a link to the store on the website and on our Facebook page. Sean, will you bring on Natalie E. It's way I just started this...

...this week. We're going to change it up a little bit. Instead of friends and fiction. I think we're gonna call our friends and food way now, since I've been a fan of your since, I first you're cooking show on PBS. And, of course, your books are the stars of my groaning shelves. A cookbook e with me. Let me I'll grab it in a minute. Um, it's the entertaining one where you have this lavish. Um, you know, the one I mean with the lavish hair car. That one. This is a very nice book. A beautiful. In fact. When I was looking good yesterday, I thought I think I might make that chocolate chess pie O e. Figured you were talking about with big hair. Yeah. Oh, were you in that? That you look like 20? She was Well, I was in 2029. I took my first cooking class of 30. Yeah. Yeah, Brooke hair covered a lot of things. E could remember our past first cross when I was a feature writer for the agency. The Atlanta Constitution. You were the columnist then? I was lucky enough to beg invites to your legendary book parties at your home in the town. Atlanta. Now, I know you're in the middle of a big life change right now. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Well, we decided about a month ago. Uh, to go up to Raleigh. Just toe. Look at what, uh, places for people. Quote over 55 independent living. And they had a apartment available or two bedroom apartment available. And Jack has three Children in Raleigh, which he wanted me to mention on. Eso eso uh, that's what happened. Uh, they had an apartment available, so we said we were going. So we're moving, like, December 1st or third or something way shock in Charleston. Just utter shock. I mean, all of us, five of us here, You know Carol Keogh to me, Natalie. So I'm not in shock. I'll just come visit you. You could do that. And North Hills, North Hills has great restaurants right there. And, of course, Ridge Books is right there, so yeah, I just moved there. Have a couple of years ago, actually. Yeah, that's a terrific It's a terrific location. Okay. Kristen, we're going to get right to it. Um, Kristen, you have a question for Natalie, right? Yeah. Eso Natalie, it's so nice to meet you. So I wanted to talk to you a little bit about food and stories. So my 2012 novel The Sweetness of forgetting is about a family bakery that actually holds deep family secrets from the Holocaust. And part of the plot involves the idea that the family's history has been there all along, baked right into the recipes, even if the younger generation didn't know it. That idea has always meant a lot to me. This idea that there are stories and everything we cook. I know that in your cookbooks, especially Natalie Dupri's favorite stories and recipes, you often include stories with your recipes. Can you talk a little bit about that and why it's important to you and why food and stories sort of inevitably go hand in hand? Well, when, actually, when I was working at The Atlanta Journal Constitution with Mary Kay, Um, See, I said it Uh uh, the, uh, the editor, the...

...features editor, suggested in me that because I liked writing Putin and stories that I write a column about food and relationships on and food is a control issue. It is like the most powerful thing there is, you know, it controls countries. You think of famines, you think of of times of abundance, you know, think of all the stories that are in the Bible about food, and you just sort of amazed about what, Like manna from heaven, You know, uh, on Thio Thio, the pharaoh that learned that there were going to be seven years of feast and seven years of famine and eso eso I've always been then that food is the most important thing to write about that it's that it's involved in all of our lives in every way, even if we don't like food. Uh, there are people that don't like to eat. Um, we still have to eat. It's the first thing that we do when we're born, and it's the last thing we get a choice about when we die. You know, you can choose whether or not to go on those tubes. And, um, and an incidence, one of our favorite. One of my favorite writers, uh, brought me a pamphlet when my mother was dying and it was really important. It was It said that we enter a euphoria when we are dying and we don't have food and and drink, and in particular, I guess it's water that does it. But when you don't have food and water, you go into a euphoria and that allows you to pass on. So with where did not know that that's right. I didn't either ended. And it was so comforting to me, um, that it meant that I could let my mother go without insisting that stay alive just to make me not feel guilty about taking her off of wow. Wow things. So, uh, what was wonderful and, well, I was very grateful for it. Wow. Gosh, food and life go together. Yeah. Yeah, right. I mean, food is more important than sex. Really? E you can't live without food. Everybody always talked about sex being the most important thing in the marriage. But I still believe that it was a after some point. Right. And the older you get, the more important a. Honey, what's for dinner? We Oh, Do you have a question for for Natalie, don't you? Yeah. I have 1000 questions for Natalie, but I picked just one. So, Natalie, you know how much I love seeing you. And you know how grateful I've been to you through the years And how your home in Charleston? I can't...

...imagine anybody else living in that house. I can't believe you're leaving. It feels kind of shocking. But I first met you in Charleston with Mary Allison Marjory Wentworth, our poet laureate. Um, she was the poet laureate of South Carolina at the time years ago, and since then you've given parties for my book releases, and I've been to so many others that you've done for other authors. So even beyond cooking, you've been a force in the literary world giving Suarez introducing us all to each other, making sure we're connected. And I know you did this even back in Atlanta. So I want you to talk about that legacy you've left. I think it's part of your hostess heart, not just for cooking, but for gathering people. I think it's your legacy in many ways. Well, I do love. I just love having people over. And I didn't know that there was such a thing as a connector. I mean, there are all sorts of new words for social interactions, And so someone told me that I was the connector and I was sort of startled. But then I realized that they were right, that that was the thing that I loved doing most Waas waas connecting people introducing people, uh, two people they married or or 11 girlfriend of mine. Um, who lives in in Florida? Uh, when she was a member, we were both members and are both members of the International Association of Culinary Professionals. And for four of her books, we were sitting at the same table and I introduced her to a publisher that published her wolf. I'm sure she's very grateful. Not she Well, we laugh about it, you know? Yes. Uh, they weren't published my books, but they were very interested in Hurst because, you know, she believes in diet food. I mean, I'll be food. Oh, that's in the same category as the people you were saying that don't really like Thio people. There are people. There are people who eat their their people eating. They don't care about how the food tastes. They just want they know they need nutrition and it's fuel. So they're interested in Yeah, the difference between loving thio eat and e a minute. But you know what I meant E you've got a question. I dio Well, first of all, everyone out there. We've mentioned this in the introduction. This'd is the Bible mastering the art of Southern cooking. It really is. And it is what's for Southern cooking what Julia Child did for French cooking. And if you're Southern Cook, it's a must have and to make the great Christmas gift for the person you know who loves to cook in the Southern food and doesn't have the book. But speaking of being the Julia Child, I have been in your kitchen, as Patty said, and it's always so much fun to get there a little early. You know when when there's a soiree, you go. It's a Charleston single house and you walk up the side porch and there's Jack with the bar coolers and you come in and you kind of stand in the front and you kind of get a little for you. And there's paintings everywhere. I love you have great art, and so you kind of check out who's in the front. And then there's the dining room with the moment Natalie...

...puts food on the table. The men Oh, don't they really? And it's gone. Hurry up, get something. It's God. Those men hoard the place, and it's it's really a lot of fun and in the back room is where often Natalie would sit with the bookseller and the books would be signed. And it was always so special. And then right next to that is your kitchen. And everyone would think that someone who is the dry end of cooking the major chef would have this huge kitchen. I think Julia Child again, right? Your kitchen is much more like Julia Child. It's very French. There's and I wouldn't say petite. It's what would you describe more than hers? Waas. But But her has always looked small in the photographs, but he had it. He didn't get a table, but how she did all right, You didn't have that. But when you think that you created not only you know how all those recipes but a masterpiece like this in a small kitchen. I just found that. So every time I looked at it, I was inspired that there was hope for someone like me, you know, because you knew the true art off cooking. You didn't need the fancy machines and all that. You knew how to get it done. So, two questions. What do you think of the essentials in the kitchen. What is absolutely must have. And also, if I looked in your fridge, what would be the one thing I would always find? Well, you know, you'd always find butter. Excellent. I mean, always and heavy cream because you can always make a meal on eggs. So the basics, you know, the basics. And then I live in the south of pecans or pecans. If you want to call them that way and then in freezer, I always have frozen peaches. Um uh, that one that black and get him. But otherwise frozen peaches and I always have self rising flour for for a cobbler, because always with something up. Yeah, you can always make a cobbler. And what's bad about a peach cobbler? I mean, someone from Seattle once told me that they couldn't put put peach cobbler on there menu because people would know that if the peaches were frozen Mhm. You know e Yeah, a forever. It's frozen shrimp, right? Exactly. That's what I was gonna say. We're willing to eat shrimp from China. Shrimp? Yeah, that God knows where what it ate when that's right underneath the so tree in the silkworms. Drop ur were willing to eat that, but we're not going to eat a pizza frozen fresh. Give me a break. So it's your favorite tool. Which of all the instruments or tools or even appliance? What's your favorite? Well, I can't imagine not having a whisk. The whisk was the first really the first step out of myself. Uh, whisk the thing that I bought when I was interested in cooking but hadn't taken any cooking classes. And I bought the wrong kind of whisk e bought around risk. That kind of you go like that. It's weird, you know, people do with it rather than a rotary whisk, and I couldn't understand why I couldn't risk Recipe said Whisk e wouldn't I just...

...couldn't understand it. That's why I like demystifying cooking, because it's not fair that you're supposed to know with my it's just not there. And there's a lot of stuff that's not there. Going back to what Christie talked about. Uh, a lot of Southern women didn't know how to cook. They had Thio or they weren't allowed in the kitchen because a tyrant was there that wouldn't let them in on DSO they had thio. They had Thio learn on their own business, and or they could watch one of your cooking shows or they wanna microfiche. Oh, yeah, a tacit Ah, take a class at the old richest department store where Natalee taught a live cooking class for many years. Right, Natalie, Right. Nearly 10 years. Yeah. People went through that school. Yes. I think I had 10,000 students. I finally counted them. Well, one time you counted them. And and, uh so they all learned to make biscuits and pie crusts. And I think that gives me the most pleasure because they learned. And if it wasn't a whisk, it would be a rolling pin, I guess. Yeah, Yeah, yeah. Rolling pins really important as well. Now you've got You've got a question, E Oh, I love that story. I'm sorry about my light, but I'm in it now. I can't Really I'm never sitting here like late afternoon, so e have a rainbow on me. It's lovely, but I love that when you just said because I remember being in college and my grandmother would always helped you makes this amazing caramel cake. And I was trying to make one for my husband for his birthday. Well, he wasn't my husband, and he's my husband now. And it was the first birthday we were dating and he loved caramel cake and I could not get it right. And I finally got in the car and drove from Chapel Hill to Salisbury and sat in her kitchen so that she could make the icing work. And she just doesn't like it's nothing, and it just pops right out E 10 times, and it's no, that is not even related to my question. My question is, you are such a noted hostess, and I have heard that you have some crazy good hacks, like filling coolers with soapy water to hide pots and pans during a party. So can you share some of your special hacks with us so that when life gets back to normal and we can have parties again, that we can entertain like Natalie? Well, that is the most important thing that I have anyone t to tell anybody Thanksgiving, which is that before you get started, before you start washing the pots and pans, you need to bring in a cooler of hot, soapy water. Yeah, and, uh, you know some particularly one on wheels if you could get one, or but anyway, you can put it in the bathtub if you need to. Uh, it doesn't matter or out on the or out on the patio. And then you take all the last minute pots and pans. So the turkey pan after you've made the gravy and the the mass potato pan on the person like my friend dear friend Beverly, who will probably watch this. But she always brought Beverly Molander uh, Mary Kay and she would always bring her mashed potatoes because he didn't like mine. E Well,...

...actually, she brought a turkey to which was when I long said, everybody Wild turkeys. Uh, eso we I always get to small turkeys like 12 to £13 and I cook one the night before and I cut it up and and put it in plastic bags and sorted according to white and dark. And I served that on, and I make my mashed potatoes the night before and I reheat them in the microwave. You're on top of the stove, but it's easier in the microwave. Mhm. And so then Beverley wants is in that day and with the turkey that she made that morning on and and so I put it on the on the sideboard to say This is Beverly's turkey Onda We can cut up, up We hack it up later and people my pre cooked turkey and they just think it's great because they're looking at her turkey, which is moist and terrific. But they're eating mine, which over a hole in the calm and and the same thing with mashed potatoes. I love e. I make them all e your family isn't sitting waiting for you to serve and cut and cut and cut. You haven't all ready to go trust your night there. You know food into control issue there already hungry because you're feeding them some outlandish is time in the day where I always insist on eating at noon and I say we're eating show up Attn Oon You know, have a drink or whatever you want, but we are sitting down when the first child cries or your grandfather gets mean a good price right there. Yeah, people get hungry hungry on Thanksgiving, but But anyway, Beverly comes in and she mashes her potatoes in the kitchen in the middle of a minute. I'm left with the dirty pot and I look, I worked like a slave for three days. And there is that pot on S O. I learned just to put it in the cooler. E think I would send it home with her. Natalie. Well, you can wash it or she a thio. I've never I've never inviting Beverly Moland into my house, e like that idea, you know, in the crockpot on then I might add some chicken stock or some cream or whatever. So they keep right out. Yeah, that's a good one for, you know, when you have a ton of we're not having a ton of people for anything this year, but it's a nice thing to do. Oh, my gosh. That's why I'm writing all this down. You got a lot of things is genius. Well, I like I like the idea of the O. E. Um, Did I put that in a cookbook? I don't think I did, but you know, I'm irish. So mashed potatoes. I would have mashed potatoes three days, you know, three meals a day. I love you of the turkey therapy. When I was writing my cookbooks. Somebody told me...

...about the concept of the beauty, the beauty dish, which is the one that you put out and take pictures of. So you have the beauty and then you have Natalie's turkey. I think I'm gonna do that. From now on. I like that. I get the big 24 pounder just cause I can, you know, just as Bigas. It'll be. But the two turkeys is really smart. Well, the 24 pounder is huge to cut up. You have a lot of leftovers that you don't want, and, um but it looks like Norman Rockwell. It's harder to cook. It takes up the whole oven, you know, give room for the but the other things that you have to heat up at the same time. So I just do the small turkey. And then if I do a small turkey that day, I just have forward in the oven. Yeah, Now I get to ask a question, and I love asking people. Natalie, you're having a fantasy dinner party. Who is the guest of honor? Who else is invited and what are you cooking? Oh, dear. Well, I've had so many guests of honor. Uh, you know, um, I've had Craig Claiborne. And And he pinched my friend Elliott at the table at the dinner table. Ankle. He pinched Elliott. Uh, yeah. You email Elia and asked me about that, right? You know, he's cute. You know, on Craig was a lot older than we were. Eso famous people can be bad. See people, whoever you want at their dinner party, you could have. And what are you going to cook for him? Okay. Just please say me because I'm coming. Whether you invite me e have all of you a a love you famous people. Uh huh. I know who I wouldn't have. Uh huh. Well, yeah, uh, I wouldn't have Pat Conroy again. E I loved Pat Conroy in many, many ways, but But he But he was just not necessarily a good, uh, dinner guest. Who would you have fantasy Dead or alive? Anybody? Oh, that's such a mean thing. Uh, well, I think Princess Di would be nice. E I'd like to just us men with her. No, e. I'd like to trash talk with her and e old jug ears. Exactly. Uh, I'd like to have Sandra Conroy. She's Yeah. Yeah, she's a lovely dinner guest. Um, I what would you cook? I would like to have. Maybe I would have an all female dinner. Okay. And I would have Hillary Clinton. Good. Sandra Conroy, all of you. You, uh, di purpose die. Um, fabulous. Couple of Michelle Obama? Definitely. Yes. Oh, how cool. If you...

...would promise that you wouldn't wear anything Sleeveless. Can you tell people that you don't wanna look at their arms? Well, arms have gotten I can't even weighed my arms. Can't even good bye to the grandchildren without being embarrassed. You know, they resonate. Oh, Natalie, I would have Michelle Obama if she would wear something. Farms. What's on your money for this fantasy party? Well, you know, I would serve a peach cobbler, probably. Or peaches if I could, um, or or a pecan pastry of some sort. Um, but I do like my chocolate snowball. That's in my Yeah, my favorite. That's my favorite. That's in the Yeah. Yeah, chocolate snowball. Because you can just make it and freeze it and then decorated that morning and it is done. So we're only having dessert at this at this fantasy e. Well, I'd have to have shrimp. There's nothing. There's nothing like South Carolina shrimp. I don't know. I was a little worried because, um, the people that I know that worked on shrimpers in in North Carolina were, uh, Robert Coram, who's a writer and the killer who is a writer. And and I know that, uh, Mary Kay knows them. And they all said that they would went out on the boats for a long time, like weeks and weeks. So then you would get shrimp. That was not well. I can put your mind to rest because I watched them at, like, 4. 30 in the morning and then goes you and they go out. And then in the afternoon they go, you pay and they come back a better, a better. It's one of our most favorite things to do is to watch them leave in the dark in the morning and then watch them come back. Uh, ships, don't they? Yes, they're beautiful. And a ball. The ships, I think that they're beautiful with there are with their nets that so about my shrimp. You can feel OK about e don't know how the other in North Carolina. Okay, Because South Carolina, most of our boats were small boats. And we get we get this shrimp and fish that's caught that day. Yeah, I know it z diminishing. However, so we have treasure what we have. We're spoiled living in the south, near the coast. Now, you know, usually we ask our guests for a writing tip, but I thought I would ask you for a cooking tip. Do you have one failsafe recipe or tip that can save the home Cooks life? Never tell anybody. What's your serving? Ah. Oh, I like that. So you don't want to hear if somebody is a vegan or you gonna ask them what? What? The food allergies are anything but it If it doesn't work out, right, That's right. You're covered. S you can.

You know, in this day and age, you can get carry out. So I'm covering up because this the way that I'm sitting now makes my s o e so well, didn't you notice it? Of course I e c those that are closer to my age. That higher necklace I'm wearing a turtleneck that I mean I came prepared strategy way probably over my face. So, e, I'm sitting in a deeper chair because e If you don't tell anyone what you're serving, then you can always substitute right. That's so smart, that is 00 I'm gonna have you over for my special crab cake. And then the cupcake turns out to be, you know? Yeah. Or you You just don't have to be embarrassed. You could do something else, right? Because you always have eggs in your refrigerator and cream. You could always make me an almost right, or he's to play. Yeah, meringue e A weapon? Of course. Okay. You're muted. Meringue is my favorite. I make those every Christmas Eve. It's my specially e. I actually named Snowball. Ever since Natalie. You served it to me with a 10 of soul years ago. I have it every Christmas. Oh, okay. It's not hard. That's the best part. It's a fairly okay e got to rein you guys in because we're gonna run out of time. Kristen had a couple of questions from readers, and she was gonna ask, Right? Kristen? Yeah. So are fewer questions this week actually come from Brenda Gardner and Lisa Harrison. There are there the two people who run the Friends and Fiction Official Book Club, which is the book club attached to friends and fiction. They have about 3000 members, and they're just doing a great job. So last week they actually hosted an awesome friends giving, complete with recipes for their book club members. So we knew they would be perfect to ask you questions. So Brenda Gardner says, Natalie, your legacy has been preserved with your papers housed at USC for future study. Has that been an odd experience to part with your things that way? Yes, it was a strange thing. Um, Cliff grab Art, uh, was a good friend of Pat Conroy's approach them about my mind, and they thought that I was part of, um, part of Pat's literary crowd because I was his his teacher. So they agreed to buy my papers, which was thrilling. Um, it. But it's strange because I had all these notebooks. I've written down every meal that I've had eaten out in a restaurant since about 19 my 75 Wow. So I had all these records of all these meals since everyone I ate with and what they ate my goodness, which turns out, actually, now it's going to be really important because people stop eating in restaurants because of Kobe. Um, and I saved every menu that I could Sometimes I had to steal them. Eso I have all these menus. Wow. And s o I...

...had to part with them. And that has been hard because anybody could go to the University of South Carolina and read anything they want to, Because I do write other things, Uh, when I'm sitting in a restaurant. And, uh, you know, one of the stories in this book is about the scene that I had in the restaurant. Um and so you can You could read a lot of interesting thing there, so you get to know me, right? That's so interesting. Incredible. It really is. So are the other woman who runs the book club. Lisa Harrison has a question I would love to know the answer to. Also, she says my work schedule is crazy, and some nights I do not have a lot of time to cook. What is your go to dish that takes 30 minutes or less to prepare? Everyone should sit down tonight and write 10 meals that they could make without thinking pasta. You know, with potato with the parsley chopped on it and, uh, your pizza and whatever else 10, um, recipes that you could make without thinking. And you write, um, on a piece of paper and you put them inside your cabinet. And then when you come home and you're too tired and too hungry to cook and you're sort of doing what we call the pantry waltz where you're going back and four and back and looking for something, Uh, you just look at those now I do sausage and apples. Oh, whatever vegetable I have. So, you know, you just cook your sausages and I always keep sausages in the freezer, preferably make sausage, preferably like Italian sausage, and I keep it in the freezer, and then I just pull them out and we always have apples. And so I just look sausage, genetic als. And then what? I've ever a vegetable I have on hand. I just throw in. Wow, what a great tip. That's totally making that tonight. Yeah, that sounds like awful. You have any leftover? You could make a soup from him. Yeah, and if you And if you don't want to make a soup, you can make a piche. Oh, my gosh. Brilliant application. Yeah, that's great idea. You got the eggs and the butter. You guys, we're out of time. So, Natalie, thank you so much for thank you. I have loved it. I have I'm so excited to be included in this glass eso included. So I'm 2010% off of my books. Yeah, books. And we hope if you're in the Charleston area or even if you're not, you can call or go online and order. They're offering a 10% discount on Natalie's books as well as I'll sign them because production books is within half a block of my house. Like you. Uh, I'll walk there and I'll sign the walks. Personal picture you ordered before you know who doesn't have a Christmas book? Christmas Cookbook. And I ordered some writing them right from book to book.

This is the one that Kathy of Mary Kay m mentioned Natalie Depres, favorite stories and recipes, and I should Yes, that's a great That's a great gift. And for the one who wants to learn to be a great Southern cook. There we go. You want your you can have Michelle Obama arms now, everybody, you can get back to your Christmas scream or you're wrapping. Or just maybe sitting by your fire with a nice adult bub beverage and a good book, maybe even a great cook book. Good night, everybody. You've been listening to the friends and Fiction podcast. Be sure to subscribe to the friends and fiction podcast wherever you listen, and if you're enjoying it, leave a review. You can find the friends and fiction authors at w w, w dot friends and fiction dot com A swell As on the Facebook group page, friends and fiction come back soon. Okay? There are still lots of books, writing tips, interviews, publishing views and bookstores to chat about goodbye.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (236)