Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 11 months ago

S1E3: Mary Kay & Mary Alice with Marie Benedict

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Mary Kay Andrews and Mary Alice Monroe interview New York Times bestselling author Marie Benedict about her new historical novel, The Mystery of Mrs. Christie, an exploration of Agatha Christie's mysterious 11-day disappearance in 1926.

Welcome to Friends and fiction, fivebest selling authors and the stories Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, ChristineHarmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey, Patty Callahan Henry and Mary Alice Munro arefive longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their credit. In2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviews andfascinating insider talk about publishing and writing and to highlightindependent bookstores. These friends discuss the books they've written, thebooks they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books andyou're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Welcome to the friends and fictionpodcast. This is the podcast arm of our friends and Fiction Live program. EveryWednesday night on Facebook Tonight were brought to you by Mama Geraldine'straditional Southern snack foods. Everyone on friends and fiction lovescheese straws on winter nights. Gourmet cookies are yummy with coffee. Whilereading a good book, you can save 20% off your order with the coupon code.Fab five F A B F I V e. So snack on y'all. Welcome to the friends and Fictionpodcast. This is the podcast arm of our friends and fiction live program everyWednesday night on Facebook. You can also catch the show live on our YouTubechannel. I'm Mary Alice Munro, and today we Welcome New York Times bestselling author Marie Benedict to discuss her newest book, The Mystery ofMrs Christie, and I'm Mary Kay Andrews. Marie Benedict is a lawyer with morethan 10 years experience as a litigator, but she found her true calling,unearthing the hidden historical stories of women like ClementineChurchill, Albert Einstein's wife and the brand and better and actress HeddyLamar. And this time Marie returns with a thrilling reconstruction off one ofthe most notorious events in literary history. Agatha Christie's mysterious11 day disappearance in 1926. You know Mary Kay. I never knew about that, andI love Agatha Christie mysteries. So like so many. I just dove right intothe book, and I didn't really know about the disappearance, either. Untilyears ago, I did a literary tour of England, and when we got to Tourky, wewere told that that was where the whole thing started to unravel. And, you know,to this day, nobody knows what really happened because Agatha never disgustedin interviews That's right. Well, let's ask the woman who dove into theresearch and might know the answer. Welcome. Marie Benedict. Thank you both.So much for having me on your show. I...

...have been avidly following theblossoming of friends and fiction, and it has been such a delight. It's beensuch a solis and a bomb for so many of us during this, you know, crazy,challenging time. So I'm just grateful for you too, in all five of you. Well,thank you. And honestly, it's been a solace for all of us. So it's been areal surprise and enjoy. And we're so glad you're here now, at long last,because we've we've met each other before many times, and we're sodelighted. So congratulations. We just say huge. Congratulations on thesuccess of the mystery of Mrs Christie. Yeah, you know the mystery. And this isChristi debuted on The New York Times best seller list, and it's beenfeatured on CBS Morning News on The Washington Post and a million otherplaces we don't have to talk about. Well, thank you. It's been a delightfulsurprise, as it always, you know, as these things always are, so I feel sofortunate. Why don't you give everyone a brief synopsis of the story? Wow,Where to begin? Let's begin on the night of December 3rd when Agathadisappeared, although, of course, the story goes away back, you know, manyyears prior to that. But for most people, the story unfolds. On December3rd, 1926 when, um, Agatha went missing, her car was found running on thecurrents or the precipice of a steep hill that led to a deep ah, spring fedlake called the Silent pool, which had been the stuff of legend. You know,medieval maidens had drowned there, all sorts of stuff. Her belongings werefound scattered around the car. The car was running when it was first found. Ofcourse it was empty. Um, people were the authorities, the press, Thetownspeople were in an uproar. They couldn't believe that this young mother,she was a ah young woman in her thirties at that time, not the AgathaChristie of legend, the wife of a world war one pilot hero. She had a youngdaughter, only seven. And, of course, she was a mystery novelist. On the rise,she had just published her sixth novel, which is one of her most famous, evennow, the murder of Roger Ackroyd. Famous, unreliable narrator story. And,of course, she was missing in circumstances that seemed torn from thepages of one of her own novels. And so it really captured the attention of themedia. It became like a media circus, which was really kind of uncommon forthat time and day after day, more and more volunteers assembled more and morepolice by the end of the thousands of people coming the fields, dredging thelakes. Following up on rumors to try and find her, they enlisted theservices of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle E. I love, you know all else fails. Let'sbring in a fiction writer to try really important mystery, Um, and then justicemysteriously and suddenly, as she disappeared on the 11th day, shemysteriously reappeared with no explanation. She was found about 200miles to the north in a hotel, and she...

...claimed amnesia. And as you mentionedMary Kay, the resolution of this mystery has never transpired. Theauthorities never came up with a firm resolution, and she never, ever spokeof it again and I felt like it was an invitation for fiction. You know, whatis there about this amazingly prolific Golden Age mystery writer? I mean, shehad 86 66 novels and 14 short story collections. Plus several plays, Ithink. Was it the mouse trap for a long time? Was the longest runningcontinuously running play on the West End in England. What touched you, Marie?What made you decide? I've got to figure out the mystery of Mrs Christie.Uh, you know, for me, it was really twofold. I think. You know, when I grewup, I was an Agatha Christie fan, right? I grew up starting her in middle school.I had this wonderful and growing up who was an English poet, an Englishprofessor of poet and a rebellious. None. And she loved to give me books.That was kind of her job. I was a voracious reader, still am. And Istarted on Agatha at a young age, so I always had her her legacy, her books onmy list. You know, I keep this crazy long list of historical women that Iwant to write about. You know, I'm kind of on a mission to excavate these womenfrom the past and bring toe light their stories and their legacies. And so youknow what happens is I'll start one book, and I kind of dip into anotherresearch and think, Should I do that one next? And when I dipped into theresearch on Agatha Christie, it turns out she was so much more than the sortof iconic Agatha Christie that we think about. You know, we think about thesilver haired, coughed matron and her tweets and her t pending theseincredible stories. But we don't think about what she might have been like isa young woman what gave rise, Thio. What was her upbringing that gave riseto this, This legacy, this talent? And then, of course, as I was in theresearch, I learned about the disappearance and I thought, Oh, my God,how could this How could this unsolved mystery be at the core of the queen ofthe mystery of mysteries? Life? And I had this sense that kind of pickingapart that mystery, solving it in my own way. Of course, fiction might giveus some answers as to what what actually happened and how that helpedbuild her into the iconic act of the Christine. Now, was there something inthe Clementine Churchill book that you wrote that you picked up picked up athreat of Agatha because the time lines cross each other, right? Definitely theresearch that I did on the Lady Clementine book really helped. I mean,you know, when I when I wrote that story, which was about WinstonChurchill's wife, I had to, like, become completely immersed in history,world history from an English perspective from pre World War One allthe way through and past World War Two. So I mean, if there was ever anyeducation or research that was helpful...

...for writing a book, it was that becauseI learned so much about the historical context of Agatha's life and, you know,she was really proud of World War One. She was really existing in this. Thisis a war. That was it was actually Victorian, But it was like this e mforester kind of idyllic Devon, seaside country, life very relaxed. That wasthat was about to disappear between the world wars and part of her always kindof longed for that life that was that was gone. But, um, there was somethingabout it that was just both that period. And then the period between World WarOne and World War Two that I had become so immersed in my last book that I wasable to kind of import into this one. It was very, very helpful. In fact,actually, I was supposed to write the Agatha Christie book instead of theLady Clementine book. And you know how these things go A publishing houses?Well, yeah, that's that's what happens. But it was It was helpful. Well, I haveto say the book was a really page turner. It was. And I think part of itwas the way you constructed the novel. You have the 1912 one chapter you hadsubsequent chapters. So 1912, you had the point of view of a young Agathamaturing Agatha. She meets Archie and moves forward, and the next chapter is1926 and it starts with the day that Agatha Christie disappears. And that'sall from the point of view of her husband, Archie, and you reallydefinitely juxtaposed both of those times until you bring Agatha. In thepast to the present. It was really brilliant, and I'm sure prettydifficult to pull off. Eso is a challenge. You talk to us about that.How you constructed that timeline and how did you come up with the idea forit? Well, it's funny. You should ask that because in a way I'm kind of gladthat I didn't you know how things get moved around in the publishing world.And I was supposed to write Agatha earlier. In many ways, I'm glad that Ididn't because the idea for this structure kind of just stated over time.You know how when you start thinking about a book and then as it kind of youruminate over it, it really evolves. And that's really what happened withthis story, and part of that was really influenced by my re reading as part ofthe research that I was doing for it. The murder of Roger Ackroyd. For peoplewho haven't read it recently, it's a classic. It's really the quintessentialunreliable narrator story, and so it explores the theme of one of thenarrators of the story. The story tellers is not credible, that there'ssomething that they're saying or doing, which is not trustworthy. And so, youknow, part of my re reading of these books was really part of my researchinto Agatha herself. You know, I was reading her autobiography, I was doingother sorts of research. But, you know, it's writers. We kind of all do alittle bit of autobiography and our books, whether we do it consciously orsubconsciously. And so it's kind of looking for bits and pieces of Agathaand her novels. And when I read that...

...and I realized that that had beenreleased a year prior in the year prior to her disappearance, I couldn't shakethe idea that this facet, this idea of of the unreliable narrator, thatthere's a mask we all wear and that we hide behind and that bits and pieces ofthe truth are going to be disseminated in different and a variety of ways thatthat is definitely part and parcel of what happened. And once I kind ofexamine the mastery of that story and the way she constructed her characters,I really started toe believe, as we all do in our fictional world, that, um,she couldn't have been a victim in her own vanishing. There had to have beensome component of it, especially because it looked so much like one ofher novels that that she had a hand in. And so I started to explore the idea ofwhat that would look like eventually, because I am interested in all my booksthat kind of excavated these women's origin stories. I didn't wanna losethat. And so that became, for the first two thirds of the book, the alternatingchapter of Agatha's Life. And in that, in that sense, the book reads like alot of my other books. But I wanted to draw the readers into that really timedrama of her disappearance, that mounting pressure, mounting anxiety. Um,and I could Onley do that from the perspective of her husband. And thatgave me the other sort of opportunity to explore another facet of theunreliable narrator, which is that there are omissions in the truthtelling, you know, an unreliable narrator can actively mislead, or anunreliable narrator can, you know, lie through omission. And so I got toexplore without telling too much. I got to explore both of those sort oftechniques in these alternating chapters until the two stories coalesceand we get to see Agatha in Modern Day or her modern day 1926 and bring it alltogether. But Murray, how did you manage it? You must have had stickynotes all over the place. You should see you guys always seemed like theclean part of my office, which is right here. I still have those sticky notes.I'm trying to figure out how you kept all the details together. You know, Iwrote them separately. I wrote Agatha Storyline, and then I wrote his storyline. And sometimes as I was writing her story line, I would dip over toethe last third when it all comes together. But the research was reallyquite different for each section. You know, for the 11 days of thedisappearance it had turned into such a media circus. There was this wealth ofnewspaper articles, firsthand accounts. And, of course, Archie was his ownworst enemy. He was providing me with all sorts of marvelous missteps andmisdeeds. Toe populate those 11 days. I mean, he was a piece of work. It's kindof a cad o e trying to be polite. You're so sweet. I mean, he, you know,he basically started dumping her when...

...her mother died. It was just The wholething was just a whole whole way around. Nice guy around. I I like to think, youknow, sometimes I was in his head space for, you know, for a good third of thebook. And I had to find something that I could kind of relate to or havesympathy or compassion for. And I started to really think because he hadtransformed so much from before the war, after the war, that maybe he had somekind of PTSD, you know, he did. He was one of the very first pilots in theRoyal Flying Corps, which was one of the first air Forces ever formed. And,of course, that the planes were rudimentary. So many men perished. Icouldn't help but think that maybe there was something in there and Iclung to that. He continued down his path of misdeeds. E tried thio. Youknow, Marie, your previous historical novels fiction novels have focused onwomen who, despite their own achievements, somewhat lived in theshadows of the famous men in their lives. But that is not the case withAgatha. In fact, by I think for me by the end of the mystery and Mrs Christie,I really didn't care that much about Archie. I mean, I had sympathy for thefact that he I think I drew the same conclusion you did that he maybe wasshell shocked. But now, just writing about a woman like Agatha, does thatindicate an evolution in the lives of the women that you write about? Or isthat an evolution of your own interests? Who? I love that question. Probablyboth. And neither is that a great answer. I'm sorry, but actually, insome ways, the fact that Agatha has is so famous and has this very well knownlegacy almost deterred me from writing about her. You know, I feel verybeholden to the women that I write about, and very often the story thatI'm telling about them is really their second and probably only chance toehave their legacy known. And so I kind of shied away from Agatha for a whilebecause of that, you know, I was more felt more like I should put myattention towards some women who were lesser known but her story and theissues that she she was dealing with, I felt like we're so modern, you know,that issue of an unreliable narrator is one that I think permeates modern lifevery profoundly, you know, especially when we talk about social media, we arecurating our lives for an external view point So much, you know, whether it'sthe way we look, the warehouses look, the way we're operating our lives. Andthis idea of crafting a mask and hiding or not even really being in touch withour authentic Selves was really appealing to me. And I hope thatreaders kind of come away with the sense that in many ways we are reallyon all unreliable narrators of our own lives and to kind of think about howimportant it is really Thio to strip away that exterior and lead them orauthentic aspect. I mean, that's really what Agatha had to do in the end, iskind of peel away. Um, the mask she...

...thought she was supposed to be wearingt kind of have one that was a little bit more riel and more true to her, andthat's what really struck true for me while reading the book That to me themystery of Mrs Christie is as much a story about the evolution of the woman,Agatha Christie as it is an unfolding of her disappearance. And that's what Ialways catch. E. I mean, it was a dual storyline, actually, because you beginwith Agatha and as you said, is this typical woman of her era, where hergoal was to be the perfect wife and her mother and her mother really enforcethis. And she had a close relationship with her mother. You know, your goal isdo a wife and mother and I love the expression to tend your husband. I mean,what a word tend. It opens up a whole lot of a what does that really? And Ican Honestly, First of all, really, Marie, I'm old enough to remember mymother telling me the same thing. I don't know anyone else, but no, butit's still a very conventional thought that don't shine your light too bright.I don't know if you if anyone in your generation Oh, I do think we get thatmessage to a certain extent, you know, I wouldn't say that it's goes to theextent as it as it occurred during Agatha's day. Um and that is that, youknow, ambition was actually a dirty word during her time period. I mean,women were not meant toe have ambitions other than to foster husband and home.Um, but I do think that, you know, today women get the message that yeah,ambition is great. But everything else has to be perfect. Still, right? And soin that way, it's not so dissimilar from the message that Agatha wasgetting from her mother, which is Oh, isn't it nice that he lets you right?Isn't that sweet? But of course, his dinner still on the table and the houseis still immaculate and the child is still tended. Thio. You know, it'sstill that message that is a pretty modern messages. You can have it all,but there's only one person who's making it all happened, right? It's notnecessarily, I mean, I'm not saying this is true for everybody, but I seeit. I see that issue at the forefront of a lot of conversations, and I thinkthe pandemic in many ways really brought that home for people. Thedivision of labor in a household became, I became an epidemic unto itself. Youknow how people were going to navigate, that, how careers were going to bebolstered or not. And a lot of women's careers kind of faded away or had to beopted out of because they couldn't do it all. So you know that way. I thinkit's a very modern issue. It is. It's very, very timely. And I didn't realizeit to me. I love stories of the sort of Phoenix rising from the ashes, whichand you were really clear about that. Was that something you knew at thebeginning of the book that this was her evolution? You were going to show thatthis is a woman who could actually devise her own disappearance? No, Iactually I wasn't I thought it was...

...possible. I thought it was onepotential outcome. You know, there are many, many theories about what? What ifwhat possibly occurred? There've been movies made of it. There's other bookson the topic, Um, but to my sort of sense, I don't think anyone was reallyexploring it from the perspective that I am which is her evolution as a woman,which is that deep dive into her her origin story and to really explore thecrosshairs that she found herself in in the days and months and weeks leadingup to her disappearance. Other sort of explorations have have taken those 11days and turned her into a detective and done all sorts of things with it,which is great. I think that's fantastic. That's just not kind of mymission, Um, but once I got kind of into the research and into her headspace, and especially into her books, I just couldn't see it any other way. Ifelt like I knew the young Agatha. Of course, I always feel this way a twist.My fictional Agatha and I felt like I couldn't imagine her letting someoneelse do that to her, and I don't think it was done. For the reasons that havebeen speculated that it was for the organization of her of her ownpopularity if it wasn't specifically to malign her husband, I think she was ina situation. I mean, this is my personal opinion. I think she was in asituation like I said in the crosshairs and the Onley way she could get to theother side with her relationship with her daughter intact with her reputationintact was to depict this disappearance in a particular way. I think what shedid not account for was the media circus. That was something that wasalmost unprecedented for that time. I mean, there were stories, multipledaily stories about her all across England, all across Europe, all acrossAustralia, all across America. I mean, she had even if she did put this alltogether, there's no way she could have anticipated the kind of notoriety thatthat was going to gain her. And I think that changed her on the other side. Andyet she was still able to kind of claim that authentic ring that she was thatshe was going for. I love that in the novel you talk about, they evenconsulted Dorothy L. Sayers. You know who was one of these other iconicmystery writers of the golden era of mystery? And you know, I am not usuallya deface er of books. I sort of hold books to be holy relics. But I'll tellyou, when I got to that line where you talked about the unreliable narratoryou wrote and I underlined that we're all unreliable narrators of our ownlives. Crafting stories about ourselves that omit unsavory truths and highlightare invented identities. It really struck a chord with me, and I sort ofsaw the through line from Agatha and the murder of Roger Ackroyd all the waythrough to you know, there's been this...

...huge spate of thrillers, mysteriesfeaturing unreliable female characters. I think specifically about the girl Thewoman on the girl on the train Girl on the train Yeah, world on the train Thewoman in the window All this huge batch of recent bestselling thrillers Andthey sort of turn the page back Thio, the unreliable narrator And what youcan do with one as a fictional device. Yeah, No, I think you're right. And I'mso happy that that line that you highlighted that is really the core ofthe book for me, you know, And it it can be read on so many levels. You know,whether you're talking specifically about the device itself, whether you'retalking about Archie and the way he turns, you know, a blind eye to thetruth. Whether you're talking about Agatha, the created Agatha, thatwithout saying too much, the created Agatha or You're talking About Agathaas she had been forcing herself toe live before, she claimed her ownidentity. And I think whether no matter what sort of lens you put on thatFraser on that concept, I think it's one that has a lot of really importantbearing for us today. And I think that bears out. You're right with. There area lot of thrillers that take that concept. You know, it kind of takesthat especially, I think, was it girl on the train? That idea of gaslighting,which of course, is really unreliable narrator stuff and takes it to the nextlevel, you know, till you don't know what to believe about yourself untilyou're so turned around and what the truth is about who you are and whatyou've done. And there's a little bit of that in here. There's a little bitof Agatha starting to believe what Archie tells her and starting toeinternalize that as part of her own identity, and I think for us toseparate that out, and as we analyze ourselves and analyze our decisions andour actions is so important. You know, it's funny when in writing these books,because I'm always picking women who have, you know, an important legacy andare dealing with timely issues. I that does that little distance of historysometimes gives women enough space toe to extrapolate that issue and bring itinto their own lives. Um, I see it a lot with women because I read a lotabout women in science. I've, you know, do a talk, and all these women willcome up to me afterwards and say, You know, I never really realized that thatthat was marginalization or that was But to see it thrown in bold relief inthe pages of the past really is instructive without being instructive.And, you know, I hope in some ways that people enjoy the read. They see AgathaChristie in a totally new way. I mean, I think she's a total hero. I know Idid. Oh, good. Because you know, she's so your friend is not that old woman inthe tree that you talked about, Not she's not, and it took her. She It wasa lot of work for her to get to that side. You know that that creation ofherself, the sacrifices she made to create the legend, the icon wereenormous. You know, it's interesting.

This is Justin aside, but I actuallywrote a novella that comes out February 11th with Cate Quinn about Agatha onthe other side. There was a cross section of our to research case writingabout Bletchley Park, and she came across Agatha in the 19 forties. It's along story which I won't get into, but you get. I got to dig deep into whatAgatha was like on the other side of the disappearance. And again, I don'tthink at all the that image that she that we all have of her is anythingclose toe. What she was really like, E. I mean, and I think that really on theinterior, because I think even her family she changed after this event.Very reserved. Careful, you know, I think having been exposed to kind ofthe infamy that she was, too, that that close scrutiny of the journalists lenswas a lot for her. I don't think that she ever anticipated that, So it'sreally been so interesting to see her the arc of her life. Well, one quickquestion since you brought up the you're working on a novella. What itnovel are are we looking forward to? Oh, well, in June, I have a new book comingout. It's called The Personal Library in. It's such it's such atransformative writing experience for me going into this story, it's the taleof, you know, JPMorgan the famous financier and industrialist. From thelate 18 hundreds early 19 hundreds towards the latter years of his life,he became really prolific collector, in particular rare manuscript in books,and he created a new institution in New York City called the Morgan Library. Itwas his private library to house his magnificent collection, and he hired awoman to run it. Her name was Belle to cost a green, and during the course ofher life, she became really one of the most powerful people in the art world.She was certainly, I would say, the most successful woman career woman ofher time, and she ran that institution for four decades. Um, but the Onley wayshe was able tohave that success and have that role is by hiding heridentity. She was actually African American. She was fair enough to passthis white. But she had been raised in a legacy of equality. Her father wasthief. First African American graduate of Harvard. He was the dean of HowardLaw School, and he fought alongside Booker T. Washington and FrederickDouglass for the Civil Rights Act of 18 75 which, if it hadn't been overturned,would have had equality right after the reconstruction period. We wouldn't everhave had segregation in the Jim Crow laws, but that failed. And so Beldacost a green, had to sacrifice her identity in order to live as asuccessful woman in the world. So it explores this unbelievable life. I mean,the people, I mean, John D. Rockefeller taught her how to drive. I mean, that'sjust like one little tiny nugget. Her life was unbelievable, but such areally, I think important. Look at this time in our in our country's history. Iwrote it with the wonderful author...

Victoria Christopher Murray. Ah,successful she is to her books are gonna be lifetime movies that come outin April. She's just a force unto herself, and it was just a reallyimportant experience in my life as a person to write this book. What andwhat a timely time for it to come out, don't you think? Absolutely. What isthe Martin Luther King quote? The arc of history bends slowly towards justice.I think I may be messed it up. I love that quote. I don't know that one. Well,I might have made up part of it. You know, it's interesting for us is wewere writing this, Um, we were in our deep editorial phase during theexplosion of the black lives, matter, movement and the parallels between whathappened in the post reconstruction era and our own time. We're so playing forus, and it was so important. It was so painful, I think, for both of us to bewriting about issues of race while we were watching this unfold. And forVictoria, who's an African American woman to share her experiences withrace both, you know, generational and individual. It really informed the bookand it really changed me. I mean to be able to look at that time period, andreally, what's happened since through Victoria's eyes is a gift that I couldhave never imagined. Okay, we have I have just one more question for you,Marie. And as a mystery reader and writer, I just want to know, you know,Agatha created two of the most memorable fictional sloughs incontemporary fiction. Are you team her cule or team Jane Marple? That's sohard because I love them both. I mean, I feel like they were my friendsgrowing up, and they still are today. And because when I read books now, Iher book re read her books. Now I'm looking for Agatha and Agatha is partMiss Marple and part Hercule Poirot. She embodies both. So I think to pickone or the other would be to say like, I like that part of Agatha and not thatpart. But probably the books that I prefer are probably the Hercule Poirot.I mean, because I mean, I love the Miss Marples, but my two ultimate favoritesare probably two of everybody's favorites, which her death on the Nile.And, um, they weren't experiment on the Orient Express and those air HerculePoirot is, But he is annoying. And, you know I know why she killed him. offThat makes. That's why we like that We from them in the end and in some waysthe more reticent but the quiet, sharp observer that was very much Agathalater in her life. Yeah, the Joie de vive and in everybody's business wasAgatha in her younger years. Well, we're going to have to let peopledecide and let us know how you team Hercule Poirot. Gianmarco, I'mdefinitely Hercule Poirot and I'm Jane Marple. I There you are. You know, Igrew up in ST Petersburg, Florida, and...

...so the idea of a vicarage and all thequaint Andi train schedules all of that was fascinating to me. So and it was sooutside of my world. So, um, when I met Jane Marple, I met I met somebody thatI had no expectation toe learn about. And I think part of what people loveabout her books is that puzzle. But it's also the character in the world'sthat come with it. You know, it's it's an invitation. Agatha Christie'ssynonymous not just but with with mystery, but with those those perfectlyordered worlds that she created. I know she's a fabulous and we thank you somuch for joining us and talking about the mystery of Mrs Christie, you reallygive us a view of this wonderful renowned off of that I don't think mostof us have ever seen before. So we hope you'll return again and thank you forjoining Mary Kay and I. And today we discussed the mystery of Mrs Christiewith author Marie Benedict, and we hope you'll join us for our podcast, wherewe offer weekly friends and fiction live Facebook shows and also additionalfascinating interviews about the world of books. Happy reading, everybody!Thank you. Thank you for tuning in. Join us everyweek on Facebook or YouTube, where our live show airs every Wednesday night at7 p.m. Eastern time. And please subscribe to our podcast and follow usthat Instagram We're so glad you're here. Good night.

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