Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Sunday Bonus Episode: Sadeqa Johnson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Five host award-winning author of four novels Sadeqa Johnson for a Women's Hostory Month Sunday Bonus Episode! A former book publicist, Sadeqa spent several years working with well-known authors such as JK Rowling, Bebe Moore Campbell, Amy Tan and Bishop TD Jakes before becoming a debut author in 2013 with Love in a Carry-on Bag. Her latest novel YELLOW WIFE is a work of historical fiction inspired by the real-life story of the slave trading post Lumpkin’s Jail, also known as “The Devil’s Half-Acre.” The book has met with rave reviews and is exquisitely researched and we loved the chance to talk to her about it. https://www.sadeqajohnson.net

Welcome to Friends and fiction. Five best selling authors and the stories Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey, Patty Callahan Henry and Mary Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their credit. In 2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing and to highlight independent bookstores. These friends discuss the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi, everyone and thank you so much for joining us on a Sunday for a special behind the book episode of Friends and Fiction. I'm Patty Callahan. Henry. Very Alistair Muted. Yeah, okay, I'm Mary Kay Andrews. I'm Christine Harmel, and this is friends and fiction. Behind the book. A deep dive into the world of our favorite books. Oh, you wanna introduce yourself now, Erin. Mary Alice Munro. Technical difficulties. Hey, hey, We are so excited to talk to our friends at equal Johnson, the author of the stunning novel Yellow Wife that has been hailed a must read by everyone from Parade 20 magazine about how she blended fact and fiction to make the devastating realities of slavery and the terrifying world of the devil's half acre come to life. And, of course, we'll also have to grab a writing 10 from her before we go. And before we start, we'd like to thank our partner, Mama Geraldine's. I have to say I live on the beach is a lot of, you know, And when my grandchildren come to visit, they use their reusable thermos is and they pack up Mama Geraldine's cheese straws and off they go. They like those little individual packs sometimes, too. And in the evenings when the kids are asleep, Mama Geraldine's cheese straws match up beautifully with a good glass of wine. And my daughters and I just like to sit and catch up when they visit. And remember, if they have five, use that code to get 20% off Mama Geraldine's dot com. And, of course, we're also so glad to be partnering with Page one books. They hand select books for you each month based on your preferences and their book knowledge, and because the reeds are being chosen by actual real people. Independent booksellers. You know that you are more than just an algorithm. To them, the subscription package, which can run 36 or 12 months, is a perfect gift. I just purchased two subscriptions for hard to buy for friends, and they were a huge hit. And I'm thinking about buying one for my read aholic 11 year old granddaughter. Yeah, Molly Love Molly loves fantasy. Yeah, the personal touch of an indie bookstore with a delight and surprise of an online subscription service. And it's curated just for you. First time subscribers get 10% off with the code Fab five at page one books dot com, and you all know that supporting independent booksellers is at the heart of what we do. It's so important to keep supporting these small businesses, run by hardworking book lovers and keep them up and running. And this week we're supporting one of our favorites, the Nantucket Book Partners. You can find their information and a discount code right in this video post or under announcements on our Facebook page, and you can pre order all of our 2021 novels there, too, or at least the first half of 2021. And just as a...

...reminder, our own Patties surviving Savannah just came out on Tuesday. We still have not exhausted our first week ship puns. I want to remind you, if you haven't already to take this final opportunity to purchase it during its all important lunch week. Those first week sales are vital to a books trajectory. And if you order it at Nantucket Book Partners, you'll get a free friends and fiction luggage tag and a chance to win an autographed, advanced readers copy of my new novel, The Forest. Vanishing Stars. Thank you, Kristen. And just to reiterate, we all love Surviving Savannah so much so if you have not picked it up, please do yourself a favor. You will absolutely love it. And speaking of books, we Love Yellow Wife has been hailed only immersive and intricately crafted by Lisa Wing It intensely moving in a starred review from Library Journal and Powerful by Publishers Weekly, Silica is the author of four novels and winner of awards such as the National Book Club Award, the Phillis Wheatley Book Award and the USA Today Best Book award for best fiction. So suffice it to say we're really excited to have her here. So John, bring her in. Oh, yeah. Oh, my gosh. I'm so glad to be here with you. Ladies were so thrilled to have you were so excited to celebrate this just really stunning, stunning new novel. I'm going to see a sequel around the web a lot because we were both called coffee writers. But it feels so good to get to see each other kind of as close to face to face as well. We can get right. So this is about as good as against Tuesday's, Unfortunately, But I also follow you on Instagram and I get to swoon over your gorgeous pictures. You and your husband and your three Children are outdoors all the time. You are an avid hiker. You have a beautiful family and you're always in these beautiful places doing these amazing things. And I'm like, I want to be there. I want to go. But I'm really interested. Has being outside and like, staying active. Is that helped you during this really crazy time? Oh, my gosh. It has been life changing for me to be outside and my my kids are not, You know, they're smiling in the picture, but they're not happy to be out there. I actually have to drive them. While I was like, She's like a magical mother, like everyone you and like traveling like No, I'm pinching them. I'm pinching them behind the scenes, saying smiles. They're actually good to know. Mm Um, Sequa, let's get right to talking about the yellow wife. It's such a powerful story. It just came out in January and, um, wow to such a tidal wave. If you will excuse fun fun, you can turn a tidal wave of great reviews. Could you tell us about the story? Yeah, So Yellow Wife is the story of Phoebe Delores Brown. She is an enslaved girl when the story opened. She's 17, and she's the daughter of the master of the plantation, along with his favorite slave, Ruth, who is the medicine woman and the seamstress. And she has been promised freedom on her 18th birthday. Freebie is a bit is a bit sheltered. The master's sister has taken a liking to her and taught her how to read and to write and to play piano. So she's had a few advantages. Well, something happens in the story which I won't give away. But it's not what Phoebe is expecting. Instead of this happy life that she expected to live, she finds herself thrust into the bowels of slavery, where she ends up at the LaPierre jail, which is one of the most horrific places on earth. And there she...

...catches the eye of the jailer, the person who owns it. And she has to do different things to outwit him, to survive for herself and also for her family. You know, at the beginning of the novel, you quote William Wilberforce, you may choose to look the other way, but you can never again say that you didn't know that. Such an important message, you know. But you can't unknown. Oh anymore. What do you hope readers will take away from yellow life? I hope that they would take away the impossible sacrifices and decisions that women the story is based on a woman named Mary Lumpkins, and there are the women like Mary Lumpkins have been blotted from our history, you know, there it was very difficult for me to find a lot of information about her, but I was able to piece together her stories through other women. And what I hope readers will take away from Yellow Wife is these impossible decisions and situations that women like her were forced to live through during the era of slavery in this country and the strength and the endurance and the willpower that they had to change their circumstances as well as other people. There's a lot of sacrifice that happens in this story. Mhm. So I've read that on a visit. It was on a visit to the Richmond Slave Trail in 2016 that you came across the story of Mary Lumpkin. Is that right? It is. It was totally by accident. It wasn't something I was looking for. I wasn't even a historical fiction writer. All of my my first three novels are all contemporary fiction, and it's like the story found me. I was with my family. We were looking for an activity to do. It was one of my hiking trips, Christie, and so we were hiking along the James River and reading the different markers, and when we got to the marker that talked about the Lumpkins Jail and it was you know between 18 44 and 18, 65 over 200,000 enslaved people have passed through that jail, and the owner was mean and vindictive. But he was married to this black woman and they had these Children. And it was said that he was called the bully trader. But he was compassionate and kind to her and the kids. And that contradiction is really what kind of got under my skin and made me feel like I needed to write this story that is fascinating, especially, I mean, the way you just put it, that the story found you, that that's incredible. It's almost like it was meant to be. It can happen to reach out like that. That's awesome. Can you tell us a little bit about the research process and how you brought that seed of an idea to life? So when we were on the trail, it was this energy that came over me. And when we got to the end of the trail, we were at this place called the Sacred African Burial Ground, and that is where the enslaved people have been buried and there was no ceremony. They were just they waited for the bodies to pile up and they buried them. And that energy of people who didn't have a voice was there, and we could feel it. Um and so that was kind of the beginning of it. I felt that energy. I felt like they were waiting for me. I felt like they wanted me to tell their story. So I just dove into the research. I went to different plantations and I got the lay of the land. I went to the libraries. I, you know, I really just dug in and tried to find out as much as I could about Richmond at that time and about what it was like for the enslaved people who live there. How did your Children react to that? I mean, they were. Weren't they with me? Were they touched by what was going on? Or were they too young, too? When we were on the trail and we were near the sacred African burial ground, a friend who was...

...with us, he you know, everybody could feel this energy. So my friend, he pretended to play the African drums. And so the kids, everybody just started moving and dancing and it was like the celebratory moment. I mean, it really was something that I had not experienced before. And so they were Definitely they were definitely touched by it as well. Energy is the right word, isn't it? Yeah, for sure. It's such a powerfully searing book. When you describe the particular horrors of slavery, especially in Devil's half Acre, you can't unread it. You know, it's like you can't unsee something. You can't unread it. It really is powerful. And we had a discussion amongst the five of us, some of us, especially when you're writing about real people. Some of us have to like Patsy, wasn't it? Patty and Christie, I believe, who said they had to actually detach themselves when they write these really intense And for me, I just the opposite. I get into it and I always say, If I don't for the really intense scenes, if I don't cry, then I know I haven't done it. So I'm curious for you. Do you detach when you write some of these really appointment scenes, or do you have to feel it? Oh, I have to feel it, Um, writing for me is like method acting. I was a theater major in college. Okay, that makes sense. The two of you, Because you were too, aren't you? Really? Yeah. Yeah. Oh, wow. I have to feel it. I have to. The emotions need to go through my body. I need to I need to become the character in order for it to be authentic. Otherwise, it's not gonna come across well on the page. Yeah. Wow, it does, I'll tell you, but I'm curious to do you ever. How do you give yourself a break when you're writing those sees your scenes, your down time. Do you have any techniques that you use after I finish writing my my work Alzheimer's in the afternoon. So I write in the morning and then I'll run or a hike, or I'll do some sort of yoga, something to get the story out of my body. Because otherwise, when it's time to cook dinner, I'm like, Oh, you know, I got all the time. I got to get it out. Sadiq, will you have just answered the problem I've been having for five years? I've been gaming with, I've got a I've got to exercise and drink wine after solving problems left and right tonight. That's awesome. Sequel. First of all, I have, you know, it's the same as you. We don't set out to write historical fiction. It sets out to write us, doesn't it? You know, I was writing contemporary. Until that story said, You tell me or I'm not leaving you alone, you know? So, yeah, that's what happened to you, too. Yeah, yeah. No, I also I often feel like not only are we writing our books, but they're sort of writing us at the same time. I definitely agree with that. It's like, once the story, once the story chooses you, you know, you either say yes to it or you don't. But if you don't, it's gonna keep bugging you. It's gonna keep bothering you. You're gonna keep thinking about these characters and you know, for me, once I say yes to it, then I then become the conduit. I try and just let the story slow through me and, you know, let these characters do what they want to do. I have an outline, but it's not filled in. It's like a coloring page. And so as I go, I let the cut. I let the characters fill in the color and the flavor and the feeling of story That's beautiful. That's beautiful. And I feel like when they say that like you have to write me, you probably felt this way about her. You make a couple excuses at first. I don't write historical fiction. I can't do that. That's not what I do. And then you guys do. Yeah, that's exactly what happened to me. Like when the story followed me home. I was literally on my computer googling information about...

...them. But I kept telling myself, I'm just curious. I just want to know more at a point where I had not. Yeah, I had so much information, but I had a friend who came over to the house and she says, Well, what are you working on? And I'm telling her about the story I'm like, but I'm so afraid like this, you know, I'm not qualified. I thought writing historical fiction was a specific, you know, that was for specific writers, but not me. And she said, to equal the thing that scares you most is what you're supposed to be doing next, and that that opened the door for me because otherwise I was I may have chickened out. That's a good friend. I like that line. What scares you most is what you're supposed to have. Probably supposed to be writing. Yeah. So we have something we love to ask all of our guests on the show, and I can't wait to hear yours. What were the values around Reading and writing in your household growing up. And how do you think that affected the writer you've become today? And then secondly, do you think it had anything to do with choosing this subject? When I was a kid, I was an habit reader. I was the one who went to the library every Monday. I checked out seven books. I read a book a day in seventh grade. I can't tell you anything about seventh grade math because I was sneaking my books behind my past. I would be cool. So I was a big reader. And, you know, I don't think that I really knew I was a writer until later. I remember writing papers and my dad editing my papers and having me do it over and over again. My mom was really independent ship. I went to Catholic school, so it had to be beautiful. So I had to write my spelling words over and over and over again. And I do think that that has shaped me. But I also, you know, I try and force my kids to read, but they don't love it as much as I did. So even though I make them love it, you can't make them love it. So even though my parents were supportive, there was something inside of me that was really drawn to stories. And that's what took it to the next level. Yes, you know, that's funny on, like a lot of love was. My son goes to Catholic school and he was just sitting in here and doing his penmanship homework. And I went to Catholic school, too, when I was growing up. And I just remember, like, you know, your finger being covered with, like the pencil marks when you were like, I don't know all of those things That is so true. I mean, we can't you can't force someone to be a reader, and I think sometimes when we try to do that, it makes it even worse. I mean, it's like becomes almost like the punishment where it's supposed to be enjoying for everyone. Well, quote one of my favorite things, Um, that you said during this launch is that Oprah has been on your vision board for years. Um, I love that so much. And so as I told everyone earlier before you came on here, yellow wife made the incredible launch into the world on oh magazine's most anticipated list. So I need to know Number one. What was the moment like for you when you found out that you were on that list and to what else is on that vision board and what's coming up? Wow. Yes, Oprah has been on my vision board and I updated every year. So I'll take some things off, things that have happened, things that feel good things, that I may have changed my mind, but she always goes back and she has the She has one place in the corner on the left hand side. That is the opening spot. So it's so funny that when I made the most anticipated O magazine list, it was people texting me, telling me I don't know if that happens with you guys. But like, uh, it was a text from a friend who said, Oh, my gosh and just sent it along. And so I'm sitting in my chair,...

...just kind of looking at my phone when I run downstairs because, you know, we're all home. So my husband's office is downstairs, so I run downstairs and showing them the tags. I'm jumping around. I'm doing the happy dance. It was It was definitely amazing. And I thought, Oh, my gosh, what you put out there when you put things out into the universe, you know your words, your thoughts, your actions, your intentions have power. You just have to believe in them. And so some other things. My my vision board is just right over there. It never I know. I wish I could, but some some I'm in the process of redoing it. So I have a couple of pages that are not completely pasted. But I will tell you, Ava Duvernay, um, is on my board and she's wearing a T shirt that says I am my ancestors greatest dream and very appropriate for yellow wife. And so would you take a picture of your vision board and maybe post it on friends. But if it's private, if it's private, you don't have to be like, can you? I don't want to share right. If you've got the guy from Richardson's, you know their vision, we all do it. Oh, my God, I tell you, the duke is in my brain, Okay? I'm writing a novel. I'm picturing him as I'm writing one of the character. I mean a real hero of 2021. Let's just go ahead and Oh, my God, Can you tell us anything about what you're working on now, or is it tip top secret? Yeah. No, you know, it's funny, because I always would just learn everything out, and then I don't have all these author friends who are like, I can't tell you anything. So now I'm like, Okay, maybe I shouldn't tell so much, but I will say we'll say that I am still bitten by the historical fiction bug. And so I'm writing a story that takes place between the 19 forties and the 19 fifties. I needed a little break from the 18 hundreds. That was a lot of energy there for three years, you know? And so I did jumping out. Right? So, um, it's 19 forties 19 fifties. It's a cross between Philly and what I grew up in Philadelphia. So it's a cross between a character in Philly and D C. Same, you know, themes that I love, which I love, and women strong women who have things to overcome Really big, something really big in the center of the story that I won't tell you. But I'm on the second draft. I'm kind of working my way through it, and we'll see. Uh, are we talking? Maybe you can't say this either, but are we talking about Are these You don't have to tell us who are anything but are these real people or are they fictional people in sort of a real setting, so they are fictional. But I will tell you the character, um, the Philadelphia character, I've been thinking a lot about my grandmother. Um, my grandmother has passed away, but she had my mother at 15 and she had her out of wedlock in the fifties. And what a scandal. What a scandal. And I and so I think I'm thinking about her. I'm thinking about that time period. I'm thinking about what that was like for her. And if circumstances would have been different, how would things have turned out? So that was kind of the beginning of this idea for me and writing the not the fifth novel I love that That sounds great. Well, I can't wait to read it And how amazing to kind of do that deep dive into your own family history. I think that's extraordinary. What I don't know, just kind of a way to connect all the dots and connect your present with their past. That's that's incredible, particularly when people have passed...

...away. It's almost like they want their story to be told to. So I feel that I feel the energy of both of my grandmothers, my maternal, my paternal and even my great grandmother's. I feel them kind of whispering and giving me little tidbits of the story. I do need to talk to some people who are actually still living, though, because I'm trying to get the details right about what it was like moving through the fifties, you know, in the city at that time. So, um but yeah, it's been fun. It really has been. That's awesome. Actually, one of my best friends grew up in the fifties in Philadelphia, so if you want to connect after this, I'm happy to put you into, okay? I grew up in the sixties in Philadelphia, 16. 17. Alright. Remember much of it. Okay. So radical A. I think a lot of our writer viewers would be so interested to know that you actually began your extremely successful career by self publishing, which is awesome. I mean, talk about making things happen for yourself. That's amazing. So obviously, you're incredible hard work and dedication paid off, making love in a carry on a huge success. Big enough to land your first two book deal at ST Martin's, right? Yeah. Oh, my gosh. You know so much about me. I got a tip my hand to Christie on that Christmas. You listen on your background. Yeah. Tell us a little bit about that journey for you. I think that's so extraordinary. Well, I started off, so I was a theater major in college and realized halfway through college, I better switch my major communications or I'm not going to be able to get a job. So luckily, I graduated with a degree in communications, and so my first job was in publishing. And so it was there that I was kind of learning the ins and the outs of the business. I worked on the first three Harry Potter books, um, at Scholastic Books. And then I went over to Putnam and I worked with Amy Tan and Bishop T. D. Jakes. And so I was behind the curtain, so to speak and publishing. And I was learning the ends and the out. So when I decided to quit my job because I was having my first child and I thought, I'm going to be a stay at home Mom, I'm going to be a New York Times bestseller and I'm gonna look good doing it, you know? So yeah, but it didn't work out that way all the way. I think I was still looking good while I was doing it, but I was not published. So I had an agent who took my book to market and was not able to get me a deal. And I had already at that point been carrying this book around for about 10 years. So my husband says to me, What do we need to do to get this book off the ground? And we sat. We made a list. I hired an editor and then I pretended to be the salesperson. I was like calling a book stores with a fake name, saying, You know, I got a great book By sequel Johnson, you need to have it in your store, you know. And so I was the salesperson. I was going to every outdoor book festival up and down the East Coast, and I remember Harlem Book Festival, sweating my makeup off and, like, 90 degree weather selling copies of Loving to Carry on Bag. So it has definitely been a journey. Well, paying your dues. Just talk about it. Yeah, really having an appreciation of where you've gotten too, That's that's awesome. Quickly. Do you have any advice for our viewers watching about self publishing? I would say Do it to the best of your ability. My protocol, when I was when I was publishing, loving to carry on bag, was I didn't want you to know the difference between loving to carry on bag and a book by Simon and Schuster So it's so funny that now yellow wife is with Simon and Schuster. Because that was always my benchmark When I was self publishing was like, I didn't want you to know the difference. So quieting the quality needs to be there. You need to hire an editor. Don't have your grandmother or your best friend edit...

...your book, hire, hire an editor and save up some money. Because if you want to do it at a high quality, um, it's not cheap. Good point. That's great. And it's really, really great advice. Okay, so we have some little fun questions that we wanted to ask you. Um, really quickly. How did you celebrate after finding out that you got your first book deal? Oh, good. I probably went and had a couple of glasses of wine. I mean, I was in New York City, so I probably was hanging out at a cute cafe, eating well and drinking. Well, I owe those days will be back again. I So you mentioned that you've always been a reader, But have you always known you wanted to be a writer? Okay. I didn't I didn't always know. No, I didn't always know, it was just something that I did, but I didn't know it was gonna be my profession. Ah, okay. My fire question for you. And I'm going to ask you this because somebody asked me this on Wednesday when we did my launch. And I just think it's such a great question. If there was any character in your novels that you could hang out with for the day or have dinner with, who would it be? Wow, Goodness gracious. Well, I'm I'm all about the child that I'm with right now, So it have to be a character from yellow wife, and I would definitely love to get I would love to get to know Phoebe, Phoebe Delores Brown, for sure. And if I can pick a second character, I thought her mother was amazing. So to hang out with roots the medicine woman and learn about herbs and roots and all those things that cure people, she would definitely be a close second. I want to go to that also, I would definitely want to hang out with them. So if you can make you can invite us, you can invite us to that. All right, My turn, So this is usually twisted the other way around. But what piece of advice would you wish your younger self gave you? Now you're old yourself. It's not that bad. It's not that bad. I remember being young thinking that the world is coming to an end and I would tell myself, you know, it really is not that bad. Stay in a place of gratitude and all good things will happen. I think you should embroider that. You say to him, Yeah. I'm not thinking of my app. Just speaking of your friend Oprah, She, um because, you know, because I mean, she's in a lot of your vision board like it's like a step away. She's really magazine. But I love her meditations with deep puncture Oprah, and they're like, one of my favorite things that she says is that the only prayer you ever said in your life was Thank you. That would be enough. I just think that is the most amazing, which is basically what you just said. So gorgeous. Yes. And the other thing that I do that that our friend Christy I'll share with you that our friend over told me you're welcome. You know I love you girls. Sure, Oprah, but the other thing she told me or told us, but I'll say she told me was that, um, make a list of gratitude every day. She says, Put three things down that you're grateful for every day I've made it. 10 because I'm thinking, if Oprah does three and her life is that Jim enormously great and big. I surely need to do 10 so I could catch up before, uh, I love that strategy. That's really good. We should all do that. You guys, everybody out there watching and grateful for him everything especially now, like it really does shift your focus onto what is going right and off of what isn't so great. Sequa, what inspires you? Mm. What inspires me? You know, I want to be great for my Children. I want them...

...to I want them to be proud of me. I want them to look up to me. I want them to say that's my mom, you know, Um, so I'm inspired by them. I just took a group on the Richmond slave trail with a hiking group. So we combined book clubs and hiking group and I brought my youngest daughter with me. I literally had to drag her. Um, but she came and at the end of it, she said, Mom, I feel like everybody treated me a little bit special because I was your daughter. She was like, You did so well. I'm so proud of you and that that I will feel that for a good two weeks I will feel her pride in me for a good time. Feel it. It's incredible. It really is. And what I mean, just to see, like I felt proud of you like to see you with all of those women on that trail and just how, like, overcome they were. And you brought all of those people together to learn about that piece of history. And it was It was incredible just to see. I wish, you know, I could have been there. I mean, it was just It was amazing to see. It really was. Thank you. Thank you so much for these amazing answers. But stick around for another minute. If you wouldn't mind. We are going to do a couple of quick announcements whether we have one more question for you before we go, but we wanted to remind all of our viewers out there about just a few things. Well, supporting indie booksellers is one way to keep the communities up and running, and that is indie booksellers really supporting them as part of our mission. And this week, Nantucket Book Partners need your support. And, hey, in exchange, you get 10% off. Sadiq was gorgeous novel, the Yellow Wife or any of our upcoming novels. And don't forget Patties. Surviving Savannah is out now, and this is the last day to support her during that all important first week, and you'll get 10% off at Nantucket Book Partners, plus a free luggage tag for your own future voyages if you order there. And once again, we're grateful to our partners and Mama Geraldine's delicious cheese straws and cookies. We all love them and Page one books whose books subscriptions are like a stitch fix for book lovers, you can find boasting some discount codes in this post or on our friends and fiction Facebook page. All right, Sadiq qua Europe one more time or you go. You've given us life tips, soul tips, meditation tips, vision board tips, gratitude, tips. But what we really want is a writing tip. Can you give us a writing tip? Okay. I wanted all those other tips to just I would say the biggest writing tip I can offer you if you are an aspiring writer, is keep your butt in the chair. It is so difficult sometimes to write with so many distractions, my writing teacher would always say, 10 minutes before bed. If you write 10 minutes before bed, you make it a practice. You start practicing that muscle. Next thing you know, it's 30 minutes before bed and then 30 minutes turns into an hour, and before you know it, you have 50 pages in front of you. So be intentional about your writing set boundaries around your writing time. You know, make an appointment with yourself the same way you would a doctor's appointment. You know, be intentional about your writing. And the more you put to it, the magic will start to come. Mm beauty, love that. That's so true, isn't it? But we can't manufacture that magic. It's you know, we show up every day, and every now and then it comes out every now and again, we have had another author give a writing. Temperatures could kind of go hand in hand with what you just said. And it was the calendar. And you had two x off the calendar You every five minutes a day. That is such a little bit. Right? But usually you're like you said...

...tonight. Five minutes goes through 10 minutes, goes to a half hour. Just Yeah, Yeah, it off. Yeah, I always feel that when I'm kind of at the end of my writing, like when I'm like, Okay, I'm done. And then I don't know if this happens to you guys, but then that's when everything starts spilling out at the moment. I'm like, Yeah, this is This is enough. I'm done. That's like all this. You know all the stories by pouring out of me when it's time to bring your kids up from school. And you're like, just so you leave yourself trail notes. You believe yourself like don't forget this. Don't forget this. Don't forget this because I'm Yeah. Today, I when I was running today, actually, on my way back, of course, that's the other thing is when I'm running you know you're getting the energy and the story out of your head, but you're also cleansing so that new information can come, and all of a sudden the words just starts coming. So I got my voice memo, and then I just start talking to myself. And that was Yeah, just at work. The voice memos in So today was only like, the second or third time I did it. So tomorrow, when I sit down to write, I'll go back and listen to it, and then I'll transcribe it. But at least I caught the great thought as I was having it. Oh, all right. Thank you. Yeah, well, you have been the most wonderful guest. We have loved having you having a yellow wife. Everybody out there who's watching. Please do not miss this extraordinary and very important book. We're so proud to have been a part of your very, very long virtual book to our thank you to do Thank you guys so much for having me. And thank you for doing what you're doing. You guys have filled a space that we need it as writers. So thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Well, So to all of you out there, I just want to remind you once again, it is our darling Patties Launch week. It is the last day of for launch week. If by some chance you have not yet about surviving Savannah after bid a bus to Longfellow, Augusta Longfellow would be sweating on 18 couch, but without it. Oh, my word. Um, but please do pick it up. It's the last day of her all important launch week. And as you might have heard to say that first week, propulsion is very important to, um the fate in the future of a book. And plus you're gonna love it. So that's the most important thing. We will see you this Wednesday night at 7 p.m. With Jennifer Robson and aerial Aha. And we'll get a special sneak peek of what's next for our Patty. So we'll see you then. Good night. Everybody can have everybody thank you for tuning in. Join us every week on Facebook or YouTube, where our live show airs every Wednesday night at 7 p.m. Eastern time. And please subscribe to our podcast and follow us on Instagram. We're so glad you're here. Yeah,.

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