Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 2 months ago

Friends & Fiction with Sarah McCoy and Chanel Cleeton + Christina Lauren on the After Show

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Four welcome bestselling authors Sarah McCoy (MUSTIQUE ISLAND) and Chanel Cleeton (OUR LAST DAYS IN BARCELONA). The women discuss their research processes and how that was effected by Covid restrictions on travel, the challenges of writing about real historical figures in fiction, and how much of their actual family stories and histories were folded into their writing of their recent historical novels. On the After Show we welcome the writing duo of Christina Lauren to discuss their latest rom-com SOMETHING WILDER.

Welcome to friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Kristin Harmel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hello everyone, it's Wednesday night and that means we are right here with you for friends and fiction. We have an amazing evening ahead of us, so let's get started. I'm Christy Woodson Harvey, I'm Patting Callahan Henry, I'm Mary Kay Andrews, I'm Christin Harmel, and this is friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors and less stories to support independent bookstores, authors and Librarians. Tonight we'll be talking with Sarah McCoy and she now Clayton and Christina Lauren will join us for the aftershow first, but first were so grateful for your over the top respose new behind in the book partnership with our friends at table, a free APP for your phone or Tub, but with loads of incredible book clubs to join, including ours behind the book. If you haven't joined our premium club full of behind the scenes info that you can't get any place else. It's just five dollars a month to join our club, or you can purchase an annual premium all access membership for just seventy dollars for the entire year to join all the premium clubs on fable, including lave our Burton's book club. So visit fable dot co backslash friends and fiction to sign up. Today and this month we're reading my new book, the home wreckers yames. Speaking of the home wreckers, I'm telling you, give a girl a fourth week on the New York Times list and she doesn't think she has to talk on q anymore to read the script. But she's like whatever, I write the script. I'm writing the script for life here. We can ever for not to that, are you? We're not to that part yet? About that as a secret? Oh sorry. Okay, so you've heard that the four of us are on the road together. Right so we have one event left this season, which is a chance to see us all together. We were at the Jersey shore just a couple weeks ago. We've also been in Cleveland and we are heading a luncheon on July twenty one in Rahobeth Beach, Delaware. We hope you can join us on the road for this big friends and fiction live celebration. We're so excited for the opportunity to see so many of you in person. You can find the lank underpinned posts on our facebook page or on the brows about books website. And don't forget, as you know, we talked about it every week. We've talked about it since our very first show when Mary Kay was wearing her pajamas, that we continue to support independent booksellers when and where we can, and one way to do that is to visit our own friends and fiction bookshop, that board page where you can find Sarah's books, Chell's books, Christina Lauren's books and books by the four of us and our past guests at a discount. So we've been hearing from you, guys we've been on on the road, that you miss our just US chats. The beginning of the show and we miss them too, so we decided to bring them back, and so each week we are going to give you a chance to ask us anything, which we think will be really fun. So if you have a question that you'd like the four of us to answer or topic you'd like us to discuss, we're all ears. Doesn't have to be about books, it can be about anything. In fact, if you want to drop some of the comments right now for future weeks, we'll go grab them later because we want to hear from you, but first we have some really important business to attend to. Oh, I am not it's not my cue, it's not my you. One of us is having a rich Christian but one of us is having really, really, really good day. So John Searles may or may not, but definitely did after looking and Ka's new novel, the Home Wreckers, on the today show this morning and so we all tuned in to make sure it was real. But if you want to go look for it, it is on our page and Mary Kay's page and he just raved about it and we just found out that she is on the New York Times list for the for in a row.

Proud my momall Yay is falling down on the job. I don't know what to do about him. Thank you. Might want to Huh, you might want to look into that. We are so proud of you and you guys. We have about the home workers. Yet let's keep on that list for one more week. I'm by the fuck. Yeah, look, Damn it. Yeah, obviously that Hashtag works, which means the rest of us are going to have to steal it. Yeah, yeah, I think we should. We're like summer begins with PC H or yeah, well, we got see so much. We had so many great questions this week that I had a hard time choosing this mop just one, but this one seemed really appropriate. So our friend Leslie Houghton said, I think this is is a terrific segment. What is your energy source? I need and well, I'm pretty confident she was joking. I love this quares Shit, especially because it's been a really heavy a few weeks in our country, and so I thought the ladies, I would ask you a little bit of a spin on Leslie's question. What something that gives you energy or brings you joy? I think for me, when I can do it walking on the beach of tide, they getting up. I never used to be a morning person, but if I can get up and see the sunrise, I kind of gives my day a great start, and that also if I can be around my grandkids, that's that's really a happy maker. Yeah, I love that. Is something supposed to give us energy other than champagne, but no solid answer. Yeah, and I second that. Yeah, now you know, like, like Mary Kay said, I think you know, being around Noah, my son, I think always reminds me why we do all this, you know, for the people we love, and that of course includes you guys and includes everybody out there. I mean, I think you know, honestly, I'm exhausted after seven hundred at seven o'clock at night, like this is the time I'm usually winding down to get it like ready for bed, but on Wednesdays I just get this extra boost of energy because I'm here. I'm here with all of you, and it's it's amazing. It's a bit reminds me week after week why we do this. I think you know when I when I was thinking about this and today I needed it and I was like, what did I do today when I just needed like a little and g a little joy to stop moping, and almost always it's either reading something beautiful, listening to something beautiful or getting outside. And one of the things, and I'm lucky right now because I'm in South Carolina, so want to go outside, I can go find the river. But one of the things I've been trying to do is let the sky be the last thing I see before I go to bed and to see the sun before I see my phone. And I'm kind of I want those two things. If I'd change those two little things. But yeah, the the reading something beautiful, but of course being with family, all the other things we talked about. But it we have to I have to remember to be deliberate about it, because you get in a slump, won't, won't, Wong, and before you know it you're you've lost that energy and joy. So think being deliberate about it is important, but a good rule. I love that. I'm going to do that. That's a great rule. Yeah, that is well, all the things you guys said, for sure, but then you know, I was thinking about this when we were in New Jersey a few weeks ago, and I mean obviously, like it's exhausting for us to be on the road and we can't just do it all the time, but I think sometimes, you know, when we get home and we're writing and we're in our little cocoons and then to go out and like see our readers again and to see each other and have that energy of like being together and like feeling everyone else is kind of passion. You know. I find that really, really energizing. So anyway, will good answers, ladies and good question, Leslie, even if you were joking. And now let's welcome our guests for the evening, Sarah McCoy and Chine Clinton. Yeah, we're so excited. Sarah McCoy's The New York Times USA Today and international bestselling author of several novels, including the Baker's daughter, Marilla of Green Gables, and an exclusive French title that I will screw up if I try to pronounce it. I'm not not. Did Not give that to me. We yeah, but I mean, you know, you would think I write books that in France. You'd think I'd be able to pronounce it. That that was one weird problem. Oh No, sorry, I know, we'll make Sarah do when she comes after another glass of champagne. Yeah, ask me at the end. Sarah's work is yeah, well, ask Sarah exactly. Sarah's works been featured in the Huffington Post, real simple, the millions and other publications. She also hosted the NPR WSNC radio monthly program booked marked, bookmarked with Sarah McCoy and is. She is a...

...board member for the literary nonprofit bookmarks in Winston Salem, North Carolina. Sarah previously taught English writing at Old Dominion University and the University of Texas and L Passo. She knows, with her husband and therefore children Gilly, pupp and to to Cap Winston Salem, North Carolina, and her new novel Mustique Island was just published early last month. Who Our next guests? Chel Clinton is the New York time times and USA Today best selling author of several novels, including things I can pronounces to key west, the most beautiful girl in Cuba then, which is such a great title, and next year in Havana, which was a reese Witherspoon Book Club pick. During her childhood in Florida, Channel grew up on stories of her family's exodus from Cuba following the events of the revolution. Her Passion for politics and history has continued. Chanelle studied in England and she earned a bachelor's degree in international relations from Richmond's, the American International University in London, and a master's degree in global politics from the London School of Economics and political science. She also received her juris doctor from the University of South Carolina Law School, School of law. Sorry, her new novel, Our last days in Barcelona, was just released on May twenty four. So, Sean, let's bring on Sarah and Chanelle. High Lady Latt, Gosh, back channel's fromm with me in the back in the Green Room, where I am just what an intro with that question, the what brings you joy? I'm like in tears and look Reagon for I'm like, Oh my Gosh, I love these women. Yes, I think, I think that has to be the first question for you guys to then. Yeah, well, I loved what you said, Patty, about being deliberate and I think that joy. You know, we choose in every moment how we're going to even if it's a terrible moment, we are choosing how we're going to face that moment, and so I think being deliberate and choosing joy is the first step to then having choice. So, and I totally agree with you. I just was texting Patty earlier today and I was outside in my garden and I said I was trawling the ground and it's cheaper than therapy, and that brings joy, is being outdoors and being totally disconnected from any kind of technology and just having that moment where it's you and the sky and the dirt and nature and you're grateful to just be alive and breathing and being in that moment is more than good enough and that brings me such joy to know that I am good enough and I'm worthy enough in this moment just by being here. And I think that's important for everyone to find that sphere and whatever world you're in, where you can kind of buffer yourself and say I'm worthy and I'm good enough just by being here, and so find that. That's the joy right there, to find that fuff. That's awesome. Well, while you're talking, and then we're going to then we'll ask you now the same question. Can you tell us a little bit about musty island? Give us like the elevator pitch while we've got you. Sure, Um mist and I've done enough of these that my elevator pitch is so terrible because it's not one. There two sentences and I'm gonna try to do like a real wait. Well, first off I had the southern independent booksellers alliance at they did a nice little feature on it and they I'm going to steal from them because I like their pitch. They said it's Fitzgerald's tenders, the night meets fantasy island, and I was like, that's the elevator pitch. It's about the island. so that's the namesake of the book. Mustic island in one thousand nine hundred and seventy two. And onto it comes a woman named Willie May and she's an ex Texas beauty queen, recently divorced, and she shows up on the island, which is privately owned and it's a celebrity island that caters to and has residents on it that are of the likes of Princess Margaret Nick Jagger, and these all are real people and real characters that show up on the island in the book. And so she comes into this and is navigating this celebrity world and this scandal and who she wants to be and renewing herself on this island in the midst of all this, and then she brings her two daughters over, hilly and Joanne, who are also trying to figure out who...

...they want to be in the world in the s when women's movement was coming of age, and they're struggling to find who they need to be, want to be, have to be and what makes them word base. So that's the quick that's awesome. That's what it's yeah, well, she now we're so excited to have you here tonight. So we start off by telling us what brings you joy and then telling us a little bit about your brand new release. Our last days in Barcelona. Absolutely thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here and to chat with everyone. Like Sarah, I was sitting through the intro and it seems like such a fun group to be a part of. Some'm so thrilled to be able to be a guest this evening. So thank you. In terms of things that bring me joy, you know, I'd probably say reading is kind of the thing throughout my lifetime that has really been kind of an escape when I've needed it, a source of comfort and solace I often find that, you know, I'll go to those favorite books that I've had over the years and kind of reread and times when I'm stressed out or upset about something. So books have really been, you know, such a source of joy for me and such a comfort throughout my life. So that's definitely something I'm always so grateful for. And then my new book, Our last days in Barcelona, is the story of Isabelle Perez. She is a Cuban American woman and she travels. Well, she's Cuban but she's living in the United States and she travels to Barcelona and s and she goes in search of her sister, Beatrice, who has sort of disappeared under suspicious circumstances. She's been doing some work with the CIA and so her sister is really concerned about her. And when she arrives in Barcelona, Isabel gets caught up in this mystery and starts to uncover some family secrets that date back to the s and her mother story and that of also a cousin in the family. So there's three protagonists and their stories are kind of woven together as we alternate between the s and the s with Cuba and Spain and the United States and we learn a bit more about this family's history, but also against the backdrop of the Spanish civil war and, you know, kind of the post revolutionary period coming out of Cuba and in the S. it's awesome, amazing. Yeah, I got I have to tell you. She now I am there's a book I love called shadow of the wind. Have you heard of it? Yes, I love that book as well. I love that book, but it takes place in Barcelona and I've listened to part of it on audio and I sometimes mix up audio and reading and in that book they always call it Barcelona like. But she comes on, I'm going to ask her, is it Barcelona or Barcelona? And that's the more authentic way to say. Probably, I know, but I shouldn't try it. Laughs. We, Brian and I went too brofalone NA. There's ago. Yeah, we were there for for two weeks on last Romblos. We stayed, we got a little like apartment and we my family came over, my parents and my my baby brother Andrew, and so we were all there in this little apartment and for the whole two weeks. So, and he is such a you know, my husband is just such a straight I love him, but he's just a straight white guy from the meeting no America and he's the whole time. LETLONA. We're in Mathelna to this day, like when I hear Buffalona. I mean that's the way you say it, but I preening around trying to be playing on to fan it. I'm gonna say Barcelona like a okay. So, ladies, you both write these gorgeous transport of novels that drop us right into the time and the land and a place that we have want to visit. And Sarah, in new steak island. That place is obviously well Mustiqu island. Where is s and Chanel, you explore Barcelona doing two very fraud time periods, the s and the S, when the country is on the brink of civil war. So the research for these novels must not have been must not have he was easy. Must not have been very easy, and so I'm so interested how you caught these places with such exquisite detail. Sarah, I know you wrote that impetus. I think I read this was a documentary. Yes, okay, so tell us about the research and about the documentary. I want to hear about that. Yeah, I actually was watching a documentary on Princess Margaret, called the rebel Princess, and I have a I have a kind of a crush on her. Can you have a curlbound, like a starry girl cracker? Total crush on her, and I think it's, you know, on friends and fictions. Ereah, I'm glad that I'm understood and embraced here like that.

That inmted time would get or that emoji. You get me girls. So I was watching this documentary and I think it's because she's princess. So that's really like prissy. I hate it's pretty, and yet she's the opposite of that. She's got all this grit and darkness and, like you know, a Mocksie tour and I like that those two things are in one person. And so I was watching that and in it it just popped up and I was doing it for pure pleasure, like just watching, because these are the things I do on a Friday, and I mean I that's that's who I am. So it popped up that she was given a piece of an island by one of her ladies in waiting and tenant as a wedding gift, and I was first off, just who gets that as a wedding gift, because, you know, I registered it like Pottery Barn target and she got violent. So so that caught my attention while I was watching. And then it said that it was the island of Misteque in the Caribbean, and my first book is called the time that Stone Puerto Rico. It's based in s Puerto Rico and my mother is Puerto Rican. So it came from a lot of family history and a lot of research that went into the islands in the Caribbean during that time. And I've never heard of mystique. And so that kind of graded on me because I'm Taype A and I like to think, wrongly, that I know a lot things that I write about. And then, you know, the universe, like it likes to do, like S, remind us that we don't know everything and it's going to teach us a lesson. So so then I was like, what is this mystique? I don't know this mystique. What is this? So I did, you know, what all of us good historical fiction authors do. I googled and up pot all the formation. That was so scandalous that of course I had to know more, and so I started digging into what all these scandals were, who they were, what these people were. Found out it was privately owned, that Pulin tennant literally walked onto the island and had the money in cash and bought it and bought the land and the industry, which was cotton, and all the homes on it, all the people that were on it. He then owned everything and I just couldn't believe that that could happen in a modern time, which was the late s or ely s. That seemed bizarre and antiquated to me. So that's where the idea came from that I started researching into it and I wanted to know more and I already had, again, that background of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean and I felt like this was one puzzle piece that was so secretive that I hadn't heard of it before, and so I was desperate to know more and I thought people need to know more about this island and what's going on here. So that is how it started. That's all. Wow, wow, and channel, I want to hear from you. How do you go about capturing these places and these time periods in such exquisite detail. Tell us a bit about your research and how you dive in. Well, thank you. So the impetus for this book really came from research I did for the previous book I'd written, the most beautiful girl in Cuba, and I was researching that book was set during the Cuban fight for independence from Spain, and so I was researching quite a bit of Cuban Spanish relations and I just came across this mention of a large contingent of Cubans who went to Spain during the Spanish civil war to fight on the Republican side, and also kind of about all the support that was going on at that time in Cuba for the Republicans fight in Spain. And I was really interested because, you know, in researching a book set in eighteen ninety eight that was, you know, such a brutal conflict when cubos trying to become independent, you know, to go from that to just, you know, less than forty years later, having, you know, Cubans traveling to Spain to fight in the civil war. I was really struck by that relationship and by the fact that there were kind of those close ties and my Cuban ancestry kind of going quite far back has Spanish ties and so I've always been a little bit interested about that relationship and so that was definitely kind of the first thing that sparked me looking into this time period and writing this book. And then also I had written when we left Cuba, which features the same family that's in our last days in Barcelona's my fictional pres family that I've created, and one of the sisters at the end of when we left Cuba, goes off to Spain. She's been working with the CIA and and that's kind of where her journey takes her, and so it just seems like a perfect moment and had lots of readers asking me if I was going to tell the other sisters stories, and so I thought, you know, picking up where when we left Cuba left off when they're in Spain really enabled me to kind...

...of look at the side of Cuban Spanish relations and also to pick up in this next moment in this family's history. Unfortunately, I had been to Spain before, so that was definitely really helpful to kind of view some of my travel experience, although, you know, I think we were writing in the past. It can be challenging because I, for example, had a marina that I had gone to thinking like Oh, of course it would be in Marbaia, you know, at this time, and then luckily catched that Um, it didn't match the s time period. But you know, that's one of those things with historical fiction, you know, we have to look at so many different sometimes you're like Oh, buildings here and then you realize, you know, maybe it wasn't a Reyby something about the building page or the reader tells you yes, definitely, yes. So, yeah, just lots of research, kind of trying to immerse myself in the place and hoping that my readers have the same experience when they read the book. That's awesome, you know. Should I always have that problem with street names when I'm writing about Paris because the the streets change so frequently you have to like check a map from the exact time period you're writing about. It's crazy, Gosh. For so many feel like we could do a whole show about historical fiction research rabbit holes we fall down right so I mean it now. Depression soap, like what did they use to make soap out of during the joke was one of my other books. I felt like hours on that because I was trying to get the cent right and, you know, make sure that I had it authentic. So yes, I want had a tangerine and Merlin of Green Gables, I had them eating a tangerine and I was told that the Tangerine had not come over and been planted in Canada until the following year, like one year. This is just nuts. Some fantastic fact checking note. That's it. But I seemed like the more I do that right, like I saw down a rabbit hole, like yeah, what, what would the HAP be called? Right, and I've rabbit hole, but then I find something really cool. Yes, yes, I might never, not even ever find out the answer about the Tangerine or the building, but I end up finding something out, so I never feel like those rabbit holes or a waste of time. You know all though, sometimes you wind up knowing more than you ever possibly need to know, like I was telling you all today about Jerusalem artichokes, also known as Sun Chokes. I know far more about the history of that tubers, and now so do we shared your knowledge of sister of ladies. All right, so these books, well rich historical novels, ladies are are at their cores the just moving family stories, which is one of the things I like so much about historical fiction. You can, you know, paint this beautiful backdrop, this beautiful time period that we kind of want to fall into, but the story at the core has to draw you in and with both these books that really did so. These are moving stories centered on self exploration, second chances, forging new paths, and you know I love the sister relationships and the imperfect but ultimately loving mother daughter stories. I mean just relationships. Those family relationships are at the heart of these books. So I'm wondering, did you draw and anything in your own life for creating those relationships? Channel do you want to go first, because I know you have quite a family history that kind of connects to the books. Sure. So, starting the the first book that I kind of introduced the press family, which was my first foreign to historical fiction, was next year in Havannah, which came out in two thousand and eighteen, and that book I was really inspired by my family's history, by the stories I'd grown up on, by my relationship with my grandmother, and so I wanted to kind of honor that but also very much have it the a fictional family, you know, and be able to have that freedom to kind of explore their lives as they evolved rather than, you know, making it more closer to my family's history. So I definitely would put little visits and things in there that make that connection, but also really the press family kind of took on a life of its own and then as the books have progressed, I've really found that the family has kind of become its own. You know, they're kind of like friends in my life for or a different family that I feel connected to. So the characters really have very defined personalities, very set histories, and my readers, you know, really have firm attached them and have definite thoughts and, you know, opinions about how they want to see their lives turned out and they have their favorites and I love hearing about that with them. So with this book, you know, I dedicated it to my readers because I was really inspired by all the questions I was getting about writing more of this family. I had not intended to necessarily tell the other sisters stories and it was really that reader enthusiasm and passion that had me write our last days in Barcelona. So I wanted to kind of honor. You know, that excitement for my readers and try to do it justice by it could, of giving...

...them the story that I thought they wanted, after you know, the other books and what they seem to love about this family. So so for this book it was really kind of love letter to my readers and and the thank you to them for all the support. Yeah, I love that too. How about you, Sarah? was there anything in your own life that inspired or or that you drew on for these for these complicated relationships? You know, it's interesting because I have just on this tour, realized that I write a lot about sisters and about sisterhood and about mothers and daughters and I have no sisters. Yes, too. It's so weird, I know. Oh my gosh, Christie, this is what I figured out just with this book. I realized that me, it kind of like is our sort of therapy is that become don't have sisters, and I all, I'm the eldest and I'm a huge believer in birth order to so don't get me started on that topic either. But I'm the eldest and I have too baby brothers and I caught them and I love them and I'm very close with them and my whole family, but I'd never had sisters and so I think that in my fiction I live like curiously through the sisterhood characters because my whole life I've always wanted a sister and yet I also have so I want a sister and I want that closeness with another female and I've sought that in friendships. And yet in a friendship there's always that if you go this much, too far, yeah, come on, they could be gone. And but a sisterhood is different. You could go that far and and what I've seen of that is in my mother. My mother is the third girl. She's she's got her too, is mine. For my mom. There are four kids and my mom's family, but she's the third and the the last is a boy, and so she has two big sisters. And I grew up with my teat's watching them interact and that sisterhood and that mother dynamic with the girls, and I was always sort of wishing myself into that, that sisterhood that they had, because they would be and there I mean their Puerto Rican women, and so they would like to see them for like an hour to Si. They would be you know, in the tin. We're on the kitchen, you know, doing stuff, and I would be like the fly on the wall getting to watch this sisterhood unfold, and they would break into some of the worst fights I had ever. I mean like, oh my gosh, I thought the world was going to end. I thought this was going to be like we would never speak to each other, they wouldn't speak to each other again, and it was like an hour later they would be laughing and joking and throwing stuff in the pot to make out those come boio and it's all fine, or we're just, you know, this is sisterhood, this is this is family, and so I always I loved it. There was that unconditional acceptance and unconditional love that I it's not that I didn't fight. I couldn't find that with friends, but there's just that fear that you could lose them, and I have lost friends when we just didn't even on like silly things. And I so in my fiction right is the one place where, again, you're in that safety of I can explore these relationships, and that's why they're so complicated. In a Mystique Aden is that these sisters, hilly and Joan they have fights where it's like they say terrible things to each other, and yet that love is so deep and rooted. Sisterhood. Miss that? I don't know, but I want to know more as a as the author, and so I flush that out through my characters and that dynamic between them and that love that just doesn't won't ever go away, and that love between them and their mother then, and that's a different dynamic and they each have their own relationship with their mother and I find also that I'm drawn the threes to yeah, and I think as there's always then that one person who feels a little left out in whatever situate, you know, and I find that interesting, to that dynamic of threes. So so does is it? Is it drawing back to the original question? What was it? I on my own family, kind of and entirely not because I don't love that, but I wish I did just to feel what that feels like. You know,...

...that's awesome. Yeah, I think that's sometimes the best source for a book, that thought of what if and then really following that thought where it goes. I love that. Yeah, sometimes you just shy away from it. My mother was the youngest of three sisters and I was the middle of three sisters and for a long time I resisted writing sister stories. Yeah, because I thought this is to this is too close to me. I can't, you know, I don't want to explore that. It just is. I don't want to open that Pandora's box. And I am I did last year somewhat with the newcomer, and but I finally figured out okay, yeah, you could, it's okay to do that. Yeah, well, I that's really interesting, because I wouldn't. I think about it now self reflecting, and I think you know, I don't write about sisters and brothers, though, and I wonder why. Well, I did kind of with Marilla and Matthew and we're lying gables. I wonder if I shy away, like you said, married hey, a little bit, because it is so close and tender. Rally come of this. What I'm working on actually has a sister and brother situation. Okay, so let's talk to channel over to you. So, in addition to your historical novel series, you've written a number of Contemporary Romance Novels. Right, yes, I have. How, I mean, I've had people ask me that question too. How do you segue from writing. I wrote straight mystery, then I segue to women's fiction. Not Gone back a little bit to mystery romance. How how did you make that switch between the two genres and how are they similar? That's a great question. You know, I think part of it just to start as being a reader. You know what, I love to read, I kind of love to write, so that that really helps me. I was always a big contemporary romance fan and then I always loved writing historical fiction. The real impetus for the change came from the inspiration that I had for writing next year in Havana. So I do tend to kind of draw from my personal life, my life experiences and all of my books, be they my contemporary romances or my historical fiction. And so, you know, I hadn't really written about my Cuban identity. I hadn't written about my relationship with my grandmother and kind of how formative that was to me, and I really started thinking about what kind of story I wanted to tell and what that would look like, and it really came across for me as kind of a multigenerational, dual timeline story where I, you know, got to kind of go back in time and look at the Cuba that my grandmother told me so much about, that I kind of grew up on my family's memories and their love for their homeland, and then also explore what it was like to be Cuban American and have, you know, these emotional ties to a place and this kind of history that's been passed down to you, but not have that seam physical, tangible connection. And so that was really what inspired me to write next year in Havana. And, you know, at the time I didn't realize it was going to take me on this journey of writing historical fiction or that I was going to write more books about this family. It was just a story that I kind of felt like I wanted to tell for myself, that I was very passionate about and that, you know, fortunately, my agent and my editor and publisher were really supportive with and from there, you know, just from the reader support and the enthusiasm for these books, I've kind of gone, you know, on this journey and you know, I think having the romance background has been really helpful. All of my books definitely have a love story. You know, I don't always guarantee a happy ending in the historical fiction, I kind of depends so different rules than you know when I'm writing Romance, but I love kind of exploring those personal relationships and I think in historical fiction, you know, we have these opportunities to to look at these really deep and difficult and transformative moments in history and look at them at you know, kind of that high level, but then also look at how it affects the personal lives of the people that are living them. And you know, you have babies being born, you have of you know, deaths in the family, marriages and and how people go about their daily life when the world around them is sort of, you know, being upended and I think growing up, you know, coming from an extile family, you know, I definitely related to that. I saw that with my family and then their stories and wanted to kind of explore that mourn and capture that for the readers. Now, do you think you'll go back to romance or are you are you solemnly on historic fiction train now. You know, like how I did that like the time like that. Notice, we know your still get romance ideas, so we'll see. You know, it's one of those things. I have more books that I want to write that. I have time, probably at the moment. I so just write all the ideas down and I'm like at some point, you know, get to revisit. So I still love to read romance and you know, it's something it's kind of what started my career. So I have a special, special kind of affinity and love for it. It's awesome. Well, it's great to be multi talented and be...

...able to do all of those things. Sarah and musty island, you write about some very real people, including Princess Margaret and Colin tennant and his wife and who you mentioned earlier. But then you know, obviously there are a lot of fictional characters and protagonists in this novel as well. So I'm interested when you got the spark for the idea for this story, how did you, like did you know right away, like I'm going to use real people, or you know, my my protagonists are going to be fictional, or did you ever think about, you know, making your protagonists real people who had been on Mystique? So how did you decide, like what was that process like for you? Good question, Christie. Say It is act. Actually, so, Willie May, her daughter, Joanne and hilly are inspired by real people and I pulled and met those real people in a I have this with me everywhere, but this is this is a memoir that Colin Tenant wrote that I got from this little tiny book shop in Somerset, England, and I ordered it and it came to three weeks to get here and I started reading it and I thought at the time I wanted to write about Mystique, and so I thought, well, met my research and maybe this will be a story from Colin an ant's perspective. Maybe that's where I'm going with this. I. But I was open to seeing where the material sort of led me and I always been looking for, and it's gonna sound really weird, like Woiuli, but like that voice I know you all know I'm talking about, like yeah, right, boy, that you're waiting. You kind of got your and ten is open for and you're thinking, tell me where story? Where's the actual story in the in this mock of material that I'm waiting through? And so I was reading and it just wasn't. It wasn't this guy. It wasn't that he wasn't calling to me, we weren't jelling, but I was reading his stuff and thinking okay, you want me to believe this. I don't really believe what you're telling me is back. Okay, we're going to go with this. And then I hit a paragraph that said that one of the residents that he wooed to come and buy some of the land on the island because use going for bankrupt and he needed people to come and buy pieces of his land so that way he could continue to be master and commander of the land and these people who were living on it. But he didn't have the money. So one of the people he wooed was a woman named Billy Ray. He was an ex beauty queen and a divorcee and he in earlier chapters of this no Maar, he explained that he had three criteria for people who were going to come on to his island and be residents. They had to be beautiful enough by his standard, they had to have enough money, again by his standard, and they had to have scandal, because they couldn't go home and whistle blow on the things that everyone was participating in on love. That he's my favorite role actually, guys, that's how we formed friends and fiction. Right, we are right now, right to come on, that's right. Yet the first two, but the third maybe so. She so she was the you know, she was a divorcee and at the time in the late S, that was your early s, that was hugely scandalous. And so he invited her to come and she had two daughters, and I so again. You see how I changed her name to Willie May and then her daughter's. I completely change their names because they are still alive and they still have families and they still live in the Caribbean and so keep them very like protected into respect them. I changed. That's where the fact you asked the question, you know, how did you kind of mix facts and fictions? So that's where the facts stopped, and then everything going forward from there, about the girls especially, is completely fiction. And then Willie May, is the real inspiration for her, is passed away. So I could kind of play with that and like figure her out a little differently than the other two, but I had to be very careful. And then all all the other real people who are in this book. It's public domain, so they've been everything that's in the book was put out in broadsheets, in the newspaper or is in lady and waiting Glenn or I end. Glenn Connor did a book. I know we're not to the book part yet, but guesting books, but she put out a book last year. I'm them more are where she told all the secrets and I listened to the...

...audiobook that she narrates. It's fantastic. Now I want to go read back any right, right, okay. So we have so many questions coming in from the audience that I think we might take a couple audience questions, even though we're sort of cruising on our time. So, Mary Kay, we pull an audience. Yeah, there's so many good ones. Let's see. Sarah Michelle Marcus says, did you know that the house of the Real Willie may on the steak is a resort called firefly? Oh, she's nodding, she knows. I did. I didn't know and I was booked to stay there a week and I was going to arrive on April first, two thousand and twenty ours. You're so kind to me. So that didn't happen, but since then it didn't actually make it through the pandemic. It has been closed down now. So fireflight is and was a real place. It really was the Real Billy Ray's house. That she really did build and then became a resort and now it's closed down. So yeah, it's real bummer sad. Do we have time for another one? Yeah, well, Christian, you would have one for us, or a cat if you have one. Go frind, I don't know, God, go ahead. Okay. So Sharon Person Chanelle is wondering if your books have to be read in order or can they stand alone? Can we read them out of order? So I have written them all the standalonees. As a reader, I know you know it's hard sometimes to give up. With the series, I want readers to be able to kind of jump in at any time. So it's connected family members, but each of the books kind of stands on their own and you can choose to meet the family in the s at the last train to key west, or you can meet them in s with, you know, when we left Cuba are or our last days in Barcelona. So I try to give those different entry points, especially if you have like a favorite, you know, historical time here that you like to read in, so you can kind of pick up whenever you want and then go back if you'd like. And reason of the other books. I love it. Well, if y'all will stop by the page. There are loads and loads of great questions and compliments. Who about how much they love your books. They want to know what you're writing next. They want they want to talk about how much they learned, if from reading your book. So step by the page. But what I want is a writing tip, because it's one of my favorite things every single week. So would you share writing tip with our viewers? Know now. Can You get first? I was mine. Probably you'll have picked up, you know by now with all the different things I've said, that I'm a really big reader and that's really kind of my first love and entry and two books, and so I think reading for me is just the best source of inspiration if I'm stuck with something in a scene, you know, picking up a favorite book, reading something, you know that's kind of new to me, just something to kind of get the creative juices flowing. I feel like books are such inspiration for me. So I definitely recommend just reading as much as you can, you know, in your genre and other genres. I learned so much, you know, from other authors. We talked about romance earlier. I think romance does dialog, you know, to such an exquisite level that I always want to read romance. I feel like it's kind of a master class and dialog. So I think really learning from other writers and and kind of, you know, feeding into that love of books is one of the best things we can do as authors. I always I used to say reading, writing, reading, writing, reading, writing. Now I'm trying to give better tips than that. But yes, it's the reading. So how about you, Miss Sarah so um? You know, there is the old rule of thumb, right what you know, and I'm here to say that I think that that needs a veigel. Like no, I think, yeah, sorry, of these books, right sorry. Yeah, no, I think. I think my writing tip, and I know this is controversial and it could probably give me like black balls from, I don't know, the authors, real authors. I don't think I've been invited into that yet. So you can hang out with me, big Black Brom, but I think right, what you don't know. So I didn't know. This island. I think if you write what you don't know and you go into it wanting to know more and researching it and digging into it and like like sisterhood, like it. Don't know it. So I want to know more and I think that that journey of discovery for you as a writer translates into the page for the reader and then they are then discovering along with...

...you do and it's much more vibrant and exciting and authentic then when I've tried to write what I know. I sound very luxury and teacherish, like this is what I know, I know this and you need to learn what I know because I know this. So it's much you're saying right what you don't know, go and explore and have fun and discover and get lost a little bit. I think that's my tip. Love it. That's those great tips for both of you. So if you would mind sticking around for just a second, we have more to talk about. But first a few reminders from us. Okay, just a quickly minder of our writers block podcast. We will always pop post links under announcements each time a new one drops. A new episode launches each Friday. On the last episode Ron and Christy talk to joy callaway about the grand design and this week Rod and Christy will talk to Carter Bays about his new novel, the mutual friend. So we know many of you have been participating in our very first friends and fiction reading challenge organized by our friend and Nisa Armstrong. This month, for June, we're encouraging you to read a book from the book clubs and if you're looking for a way to keep track of these books and your other reading, we would love to recommend our beautiful reading journal from Oxford Exchange. And the friends and fiction official book club is having a blast and if you're not there you're missing out. The group, which is completely separate facebook page and is run by our friends Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardner, is now twelvezero strong. We celebrated last week with them. So Brendon Lisa, otherwise known as PEB and J choose a book every month for them to talk about. They will have spoilers. Everybody can chime in. The author comes on, they have happy hours with our writers block podcast host from block and they keep everyone in the loop about suggested reads and upcoming releases. Their book of the month that they chose to have a chat with on June twenty is Mary K Andrews, the home wreckers, so you need to pop overs and join them. I also was just going to say little Typo the new podcast episode with Carter Bays is actually with Ron and are managing director Meg who is by Oh yeah, that was totally I don't know where that came from. Anyway, I wish I had gotten to talk to Carter Bays because I am a big fan. So, anyway, I'm super excited to listen to that. I cannot wait. Well, how hard the days? I mean, I don't think people know his name, but he was the writer for how I met your mother and now the new hilary deaf one, how I met your father. Yeah, so that we really fascinating. I am very cool. So make sure to join us for a next episode of Friends of fiction next Wednesday, right here at seven PM. Or we will welcome for Hendrix. Sarah, can I always say her name? I'm Sarah Packnin right, yes, yes, Ali Brady, Angelina and Mary Alice Monroe. If you were every wondering your better schedule, it is always on the friends of fiction website and on the header graphic on our facebook page. So now, Sarah and Chanelle, one last question. We always like to ask what were the values around reading and writing you were growing up? So, Sarah, lets start with you, whoa Um, that's deep. Actually, my mom is a career elementary school teacher, forty year in the business. So the values of reading and writing, I mean that was like up there with Jesus. So like that's not the first. Yeah, so looks from Jesus. Yes, and I was Compuyo. Those were all like on a level. Know what about you? You know, I didn't really necessarily come from a family of big readers, but just ever since I was little, you know, I love to read and I remember my parents were really great about taking me the library. You know, I was a kid that would go up to the check out desk with, you know, the huge stack of books and library would be like, are you going to read all of those? Definitely next week? All right. Yeah, so I think it just was always, you know, such a passion for me. I love the fact that books, when have to transport you anywhere and, like I said before, such a great escape and and source of solace and difficult times. And writing just kind of evolved from that. You know, I think that once you read a ton, then you start to think, oh, what if I told you know, my own story, or what if I tried this? And and really I found that it was something that I loved and really was just a wonderful creative outlets to have.

That's awesome, so great. Well, ladies, thank you so much for being with US tonight and for just being so open and honest and sharing about your new books in your lives, and I know we all feel like we've just it was such a treat to have you here and we've all gotten to know you better. So we can't wait for everyone to read your beautiful new novels, and thank you for being here, thank you for having us. Yes, there's the best. You really are, ladies. All right, everyone. Now, don't forget. You can find all of our back episodes on Youtube. We're live there every week, just like we are on facebook, and if you subscribe you won't miss a thing. Plus you'll have access to special short clips. So be sure to come back next week, same time, same place, and make sure right now stay for the after show with Christina Lauren. Welcome to the after show. What a great night, and more to come. We're too awesome, and more so, one of the questions we didn't get to that was asked in the chat once. They want to know what you're drinking because it looks Oh yeah, well, I will say it's really just a good glass. You know, it's a pink like a stuff. It's one of those a style colored glasses. I don't know if y'all see those, as seen on today, just like Mary Kay Andrews, but I'm actually drinking guava Kombucha and it's quite delicious, but I'm not having towns, but it still looks good. Yeah, it was so fun to hear and what it and then and they kind of sympatico the way they, you know, had to do the research about these islands. Yeah, yeah, I kept wanting to ask them, could you just say buy my book? Damn it, in Spanish. Boat done so. I'm gotta think I mean Cuban and Puerto Rican. They must really did that. They have active skills for sure. Yet that well, guys. Should we welcome on Christina Lauren? Oh Yeah, all right, let's welcome Christina hobs and Lauren billings. Mka, that's you. I was waiting for them to come on camera. Oh my God. First, okay, I'm ruin here. They just released me from the home is the combined pen name of best friends and longtime writing partners and best friends. That was twice that was not my fault. That was twice. Christina hobs and Lauren go, the number one international best selling duo, writes both young adult and adult fiction and they're published in over thirty languages. They've been inducted into the library reads hall of fame, they've been nominated for several good reads choice awards and they've been named Amazon and audible romance of the year and a lambda literary award finalist. My Gosh, she's, like so many things, amazing. I know there's out there so great. They have also been featured in the Washington Post, entertainment weekly and many other outlets. Lauren, who everyone kills calls low, that's what I call her. Lohd and neuroscience and used to work in research. She is wearing a lab coat and goggles before she made writing her full time job. Christina, who low calls PQ nicknames from them by the end of the night. Okay, she used to work in a junior high counseling office, but now she can be found at her desk writing or watching and I don't know what bets stands for. Bets. That's a Korean pop even. I know that you know, Daddy, because how can you caught in your LN trap? I don't even. They've been on the today show and now she called. That's all things today. So their new novel, Christine, who we can read them in the chat, Increastina says, Patty, not open that door. Oh just sea was broken, getting strong. I am never saying Halla. I get I said it when when I try to be relevant, it doesn't talk about this. Their new novel, something wilder, hit stores on May Seventeen. All Right, welcome Christina and Lauren. If they still want to go sitting backstage cracking up at you guys, I'm like, don't ask us about bets. The seal is broken. Will Start.

I will google it when we're done, because obviously I didn't need to crack anything. But Daddy, I could be your Google, like. Tell me what you want to know and I will. All of you will be ts for hours. Okayn't know what she says. I'm so glad you guys are here. Well, for we are so excited about the new book. So before we could of dive in, can you guys tell us a little bit about something wilder? Yes, okay, so first of all, I know we have the names, but I'm Lauren. She's Christina. We write togethers go up. There's obviously so something wilder. This is a story that's kind of an homage to the adventure movies of our youth. So if you're a fan of Romancing the stone or Indiana Jones, is sort of right up your alley. This is a story of Leo Grady and Lily Wilder, and that is an homage to Joan wilder fromament. So don't wilder. Yes, and they are former flames that have been separated due to circumstance over the last ten years, and you'll obviously find out what that circumstance is. And they're thrown back together when Leo's Group of Guy Friends books and expedition with Lily's adventure company, and her company takes tourists out into the Red Rock Canyon Lands of Utah on these fake treasure hunts. So when everything goes sort of horribly wrong, they realize they might be a real treasure out there and Leo and Lily have to decide if they trust each other enough to go after it. HMM, yeah, yeah, you had me at John Wid us. Yes, okay, now you too, low and Pq for Prom Queen really good. Prom Queen? No, no, no, so I you just have very curly haired Loys to tease me about it. I'm giving my hair break from her nails are always perfect in her makeup. So I always call her prom queen, but it's a loving term. It's not a justice right. Okay, so you two, low and peak, you have been writing partners for over ten years. But tell me, tell all of us how the two of you met and what kind of reaction do you get when you have to break the news that you are in fact not one person but about dynamic writing duo? Anybody who has met US will not be surprised that we we met writing fan fiction, because we have fandom in our soul. We are the biggest fan girls that ever lived. So we were met writing fan fiction. Low was putting on a panel at San Diego Comiccon in two thousand and nine and I had a story online at the time, so she invited me to come and we just met and just hit it off and decided to write something together. Very naively, we've wrote. We were like a Oneshot, like thick thing together, and that was so fun to we were like, let's write a book. Do you want to read a book together, like that was the next obvious step. And No, no, it's not. No, no, there Andrews, when when Pq came up and said, do you want to write a book, that would have been the end of whatever this story is. I mean, we didn't know better. We were so sort of just like innocently excited to collaborate, and I mean I'm glad that we were sort of dummies in that way, because I think had we known like the obstacles that would meet us in publishing, we would have been like, no way. But but that's not the the FAMDOM is like. When you're writing thick you're doing it just for the sure, the sheer love of something. You just are both crazy about the same thing, and so everybody reads everybody story, severybody, and it's Beta's, you know everything, everybody's works. So it just was like such a natural thing to do. And yes, people are surprised every single day that there are two of us. Every day I will sell low a tweet. It's like I am today years old when I realized Christina Lauren is to I love but fighting. You know, you want your books to feel like they've written, been written by one person. So it's such a compliment when people don't know. Yeah, or it shows how like much the world is changing and how open things are that more and more people will say, Oh, I thought that they were just like non binary and they went by they and they were just so excited with that and I love that so much. I just feel bad pointing though you like we are actually a plural day yes' clural. So, Christina, I know you. You live in Utah, right. Yeah, okay. So can you talk about how you decided to set something Wilder in Utah? Have you said a book there before? It? Was this a first for you? So our book autoboiography takes I do that. I've read that, of course.

Yes, takes place in Provo, Utah, and then in a holidays takes place in Park City, Utah, and I don't think it was ever just like this like conscious thing, like let's set some books in California, where a lowe lives, let's set some books in Utah. Just sort of happens. We we really love writing books where you feel like you can see everything around you and that you feel like you're in a movie, and that happens when you're usually really familiar with something. So if you've ever seen the opening scene of Indiana Jones in the last crusade, when Young Indiana, who's River Phoenix, is out and it's just this beautiful vista of like red rocks, they're like boy scouts going in and they catch like somebody robbing it, you know, tum or something, we wanted it to sort of feel like that. This just beautiful, gorgeous like it almost felt alien. is so different from everything we really used to so that's why we said it there. I live in you to and I don't spend a lot of time in that area. Like my idea of camping would have like a chandelier. I like that, and room service to yeah, and I'm sting cooler, obviously. Yes, why CHAP WITHOUT ONE? Yeah, that was without saying due so, given that, was there any special research that went into writing this book? Yeah, so we found this canyoneering guide and he was actually a scout for movie sets. So he would take fancy people out into the Canyon lands and make them think they were going to die and then like miraculously save them. But he was really knowledgeable, obviously, about the area. He knew our story has a sort of a sub plot about butch cassidy's treasure and how some people believe and truly that the this money that he hid in various places is still out there before he fled to Argentina. And so this guy, Philip, knew a lot about all of those legends. You knew the area really well, and so he created this map for us this like bake treasure hunt, and it was way longer than we ended up keeping in the book, just because, I mean you guys all know, like you, you have stick fitional fictional license with some things, and it was just like you know, we they would have been out there for fourteen days and it was just too long for the story. But but yeah, so he wrote us like a list of things they'd have in their backpacks and what kinds of meals they would have out there, and he, you know, plotted the core and it was really helpful. That's nice. It's awesome. And did he have a champagne cooler, though the most did. This is a very rustic man and we like it. gave us so much information, I mean like pages and pages and pages, and we could only use a fraction of it. So, like our author's note at the beginning is basically like we did all this research and we ignored a lot of it and if you follow our path you will die. Do not do what we say. Wanted to be like wild or people like went in like did the dictual. Yeah, right, exactly. He did say he took some very rich people and he like name dropped a little bit. He took very, very like important people out to do these things. That was exciting. Yeah, cool, the IT. It makes me think, like who would go do what Indiana Jones did if it's kind of self evident that if we tried so to Indiana Jones journey, we, I. would most likely, I mean none of Um would do it. No, need us to say if there are snags involved, exactly, come out die. Yeah, okay, back to something wilder and not Indiana Jones, departure from what you usually write. There's still a lot of romance like your other novels, but there's a lot more action and adventure. Did you want to write? Like did you say this is going to be an adventure novel? And if you did, like why now? Why now is the time that you said this is this is what we want to do. I don't know that we necessarily set out like we want this to be super different, but what we did want is for it to be fun. So he sat down to write in the beginning of two thousand and twenty one lows in California. So most of California was still in like a really serious blockdown and we just could not imagine writing something that took place in a coffee shop or an office or something. So we just wanted to be outside and we wanted to have an adventure, even if it just was one of our characters. But so, of course it did end up being bigger, it did end up being fun. There's like car chases and and all you know, people almost die and that kind of thing. But I read this review once it was like I keep seeing that this book is so different. But it's different in the way that like autobiography is different than love, and other words, it's different than Joshian diesel, is different than, you know, at a holidays. It's so I sort of love that that our readers...

...have let us do all of these different things. Well, when you decided we want this to have more adventure, I'm just curious because of the dynamic between you two, like can you even go back and say, oh, that was her idea, that was her idea, that was her idea, because I know when we try to go back, wait, whose idea was that? But yeah, like, can you even say who? Yes? No, I mean the overall idea for this book was Christine, as we had an initially thought of doing it as like a screenplay, and early idea of it was that Leo was the cowboy that was sort of down and out and lily was the city girl that had had to leave him to go take care of her little sister after a tragedy, and we started writing that version in the book and like I was writing Lily's point of view as the city girl and I was like, I am home with two kids doing virtual school, my husband is working upstairs. I like cannot work for twenty minutes before somebody needs something and I don't want to write about a woman who's put her life on hold for to take care of family. So we generally love that. You could be honest about that. That is so great. So yeah, I mean I think we just kept writing the chapter and rewriting and I didn't know I wasn't working. I realize that's why and so when we gender swapped it, it was just like everything kind of unscrolled from there. So I think once we got into it, the ideas are all shared and it happens just this magic when we're in the room together, this collaboration of just like talking through stuff and figuring out how to plot these things. But the initial concept of this one, yeah, I like we knew it was Christina, but most of the time it's very collaborative. You know, that's amazing. And then you were really Christina to say that was my idea. But sure, but it's not working for you, let's gender swap it. Yeah, but Oh, yeah, I mean we just wanted to do something fun. I mean, seriously, we just wanted somebody number one. This was the funnest thing we have ever written. It's like at the end of it we were just like polly cow. That feels almost like we cheated because it was so fun and we've read a lot of books, gathered and had a lot of fun and made each other laugh and surprised each other and stuff, so for this to be so fun and so different was just, you know, it was like, because it treat human, there's something you know, and so yeah, we just wanted it to be fun. We wanted people at the end to close the book. I just be like, whoa expecting that? The way you felt when you watched romancing the stone? Yeah, like, if anybody has seen the lost city that? Yep, Yep, yeah, I love that movie. I Love Every Indiana Jones. Oh Yeah, and this is we say, this is like Indiana Jones, but with more kissing, our kissing it. I actually think that's like the quote to end on. No, ladies, we are oh very care I'm sorry, I was just I'm sorry, I muted because my dogs were barking. That could be like flap copy right, Indiana Junes, but which work was marcus? Yeah, while speaking of girls, we're basically you girls. We are fan girls. We should write fan fiction of Therbo. No, she did not, did she? She said. I think she thought she was muted. I didn't. I say show we are big fan girls, are both of you, and we are so excited about this book. We cannot wait for everyone to read it. So thank you so much for joining us, and everyone out there, thank you so much for being a part of our friends and fiction family. And don't forget that's something wilder. Our last days in Barcelona and musty islet, as well as books by the four of us, are available on our book Shoptorg page. We cannot wait to see you next week, right here to same time, same place. See then. Good night. Can Let you thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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