Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Sunday Bonus Episode: Friends & Fiction with Susan Boyer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Join Kristy, Patti & Mary Kay as they sit down with USA Today bestselling and Agatha Award winning author Susan M. Boyer to chat about her Liz Talbot Lowcountry Mystery series (now 10 titles strong!) and her wildly popular Lowcountry Book Club group on Facebook. https://www.susanmboyer.com

Welcome to Friends and Fiction. Five best selling authors and the stories. Novelists, mary Kay andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, harvey patty Callahan, Henry and mary Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books to their credit In 2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviews and fascinating insider. Talk about publishing and writing and to highlight independent bookstores. These friends discuss the books, they've written the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Yeah. Hi everyone and thank you for this sunday. Oh it's so funny with just the three of us. Look at us. So thanks for joining us on a sunday for a special behind the book episode of Friends in Fiction. I'm Christie Woodson harvey and I'll be your host. I'm paddy Callaghan. I'm mary Kay Andrews And this is friends in fiction today we don't get our names mixed up when it's just it's just the three of us. Right? There's no awkward because of like wait, who's next alphabetically. We really, y'all we nailed this go us. That was our best introduction and 80 episodes. Uh huh. Today we are so excited to be talking to a good friend of all of our Susan Boyer, the USa Today, bestselling author of the Liz Talbott series and founder of a group. I'm sure a lot of you know the incredibly popular facebook group, Low country Book Club and you all know that supporting independent booksellers is the beating heart of what we do. It's what we said we would do when we founded Friends and Fiction and this week we are supporting a favorite of all of ours. We all visit them every time we have a book out and that's Foxtail Book Shop in charming Woodstock Georgia. They have created a one stop shop landing page for all of our new releases including Susan's and our Wednesday night guest. This past week, Vanessa Riley. The link will be available on our facebook page but for now we're so excited to welcome our charming guest Susan Boyer. Susan Mboya, we'll ask her what the M stands for magnetic marmalade marmalade. I I don't know, no, isn't sent. Susan is the author of the USA Today, Bestselling Liz Talbott mystery series. She was blessed with a quintessential small town girlhood and has had a lifelong affair with books. She's grateful to have been gifted with an overactive imagination. She was one of those Children whose teachers were always telling her mama she needed her talents to be channeled. I wonder if her teacher stopped told her to stop...

...visiting with her neighbors. Anyway, Susan's been making things up and writing them down her whole life. Her debut novel, Low Country boil, won the 2012 or 2012 Agatha Award for Best first novel. That's really impressive. That's kind of amazing. The Daphne Dem or Award for Excellence in Mystery and Suspense and several other award nominations. The third book in this series, Low Country Bone Yard was a Killer Spring 2015 Southern Independent Booksellers Award, Okra Pick. And was shortlisted for the 2016 Pat Conroy Beach Music Mystery Prize. Low Country Book Club was the Summer 2016 Ciba Okra Pick and was shortlisted for the Southern Book Prize in mystery and Detective fiction. That is just a lot of amazing awards that Yeah, well, especially, you know, when you think about having a series that has right, we're going to talk to her about this, but it's just it's amazing to really think about, you know, that kind of longevity in the series and all those amazing awards. There are currently 10 bucks in the list. Talbot series, Liz Talbott and Nate Andrews will have a new case that we're going to be talking to Susan about soon. Susan loves beaches. She's currently at pawleys Island, Southern food and small southern towns for everyone knows everyone and everyone has crazy relatives. You'll find all of the above in her novels. She lives in north Carolina with her husband and spends every second she can on the Carolina coast. I thought you lived in south Carolina. We're gonna have to talk about this situation. Talk about this. Oh no, she moved back to north Carolina I think. All right. At any rate, we'll ask her Sean bring Susan on. Hi Susan. Hello. Hello north Carolina or south Carolina? Clear it up. Okay, so it's South Korea. It was South Carolina for 30 some odd years because you're in Greenville. I was in green ball and, and Mount pleasant for a while. But we lived in south Carolina for a long time. I've lived in south Carolina longer than north Carolina. But um, we recently moved back to rowan county because uh, to be closer to my parents. That's so great and what a great place to live. I'm gonna talk about this a little bit later. But Susan and I are both from roman county, which is, wow, so crazy. And really that's a small, small world. It is a small world. Well, Susan, we are so thrilled to have you here and thank you for joining us tonight. Oh, thank you for having me, Susan. We're so happy you're here. I think the last time I saw you was doing the book club. So it's happy that to flip the tables on you. Um we have all been guests of yours at the past in the Low Country Book Club and you have created one of the kindest, most supportive corners of...

...the internet. Before you tell us about the idea for the Low Country Book Club, What does the m stand for Michelle? It's my middle name. Okay. I must say that's awesome. So tell us about your idea like how what was the origin of the Low Country Book Club? How did it get started? You know, I'm a little embarrassed to say this because it was it was an accident. Um you know, I started out with a group of uh, of readers who enjoyed my books and we talked about my books and it was just my little corner to be there with them and be accessible to them. And it started growing and you know, after we got through talking about my books, I mean we were all reading a lot more books and there was just nothing else to say about the current release that I had. And so I started talking about what I was reading and then they started talking about what they were reading. And suddenly we were talking about all of your books and and other folks books and books that we all loved. And there was just this commonality of of what everybody liked to read. And so I changed the name of the group from Liz Talbott's Book Club to Low Country Book Club. And we just kept on doing what we were doing, talking about about the books that we loved. And it was very organic because people just joined um you know, they told a friend or or whatever. And One day I just woke up and there were more than 10,000 people in there and I'm like, how did this happen? So it was an accident, but a happy accident. I love it, I have so much fun with it and having all of you of course, and I think that's a little bit what happened to us, right? There's, you know, when you go, when you start to gather readers, they're just community, just builds on community and builds on community. Um, so if the facebook gods are correct, you started the group in 2000 and 18, so it is a very active for those of you out there, It is a very active book club. How do you keep things? Maybe it's a selfish question. How do you keep things so fresh and keep people coming back day after day and then balance your own writing with managing this active group. So advice and how are you doing it? We really brought you on today, we're just gonna steal your brain for a little tiny bit. You know, I have help and and you know, I couldn't possibly do it all myself. Um I I spent time in that group every day chatting with people and commenting and responding and and that kind of thing. But um and and and I post there every day but I have helped with you know graphics and things like that, like most folks do and I have helped um managing and monitoring the group because otherwise I would never...

...have time to write and you know I have to do that of course, so I have help. I mean it's I could never spread myself that then. So we're having had a twin who you kept fuck up and then they did the work. So no, I have an assistant. Her name is mary Ann and she's awesome. I don't think she ever sleeps but I do not have a clone. I wish I did. I could or twins hey he was in speaking of writing, I was just blown away that the temps Liz Talbott book in the series, Low country boughs of holly released in december. When you began that series, Liz Talbott, did you foresee it lasting this long? I really planned for it to be a series. Uh and in the beginning I wanted to write one series and and I just wanted to write a bunch of books because I love long series. I love getting invested in characters and the characters sort of becoming your friend that you want to revisit and I love reading those things that I can go back and visit the same characters over and over again and they're like old friends. And so I really, I wanted to write a series that was just one series that I wrote a bunch of books in. Now. I have a few other ideas, but I still want to write, listen Nate because I enjoy them. Could you tell us a little bit about the publishing path for the first one in the series? Oh wow, that was right. Yeah, Low country boil was the first one. That was that was interesting. It was, it was a rough path. You know, I I had been working for a ladies apparel company and it went out of business and my husband and I decided I could give the writing thing ago and so I started working on that book and it took me a long time to get it polished, you know, where I felt like I could submit it and then, you know, that was submitting it to agents. And when I first started submitting that book to agents, most of them were still paper queries. So we were typing letters and mailing them with the self addressed stamped envelope. Still, uh, that was uh Yeah, did you? I would have thought it was in like, 20 11, I mean, it wasn't that long ago. It's like, not, I mean, I would think that it would have been all email at that point. And I remember having new letterhead made and I was like, for sure if I get really nice letterhead and I spent a lot of money on it, I'll get an agent. And I did like, like, because then I wouldn't need it, you know? So I had all this letterhead, but like, I didn't need, so that was that's my tip. and going to Kinkos. Remember we would go to Kinko's and uh, yeah, I remember going to the post office. Yeah, yeah. Now you just go, sorry season. Yeah, that's okay. So, so she was finally found an agent. She was no, the first one was going out on submission and she went on sick leave and didn't come back. And so they moved...

...me to a different agent. And he had editorial context with folks that did like, uh, I don't know, urban fantasy and things like that. So not the same stuff. And you know, eventually I just, I was just, I was so ready to have this book out in the world and I knew of a small press that was just starting up and I thought this would be a good idea. I sent it to the editor, she loved it. And so the agent sort of talked to her and he worked me through the contract and all that. But then we sort of parted ways soon after that. And um and so I went with a small boutique publisher for mysteries for the first book and then just ended up being with them for a while and actually just have wrapped up the 10 books that I will do with that publisher. Uh um you know, in his theories like this one that's been What 10 years, you've built a really loyal following. And I and I've I've been in that place to I did a eight, I did a book series and I know those readers have a lot of opinions about your protagonist, Liz is choices. How much do you listen to them when you're deciding what's happening in her life next? You know, I try to keep them in mind. I try to think about what do my readers want. I mean I mean of course I have my own ideas but I try not to stray too far from what I think they want because I want them to be happy. I want them to keep coming back for more list. So I try to think you know, what do they want, what is the book that they want and especially with the most recent 1000 holly, I used to I thought about that a lot, you know what is it my readers want because I knew they wanted a christmas book with Liz and I just tried to give them what I thought they wanted and you know that's that's all I guess you can really do is try but I just try to keep them in mind. Mhm. I love that. Well um I have a short series that's just three books, but I have a christmas book coming out in october and um I started to feel this huge pressure because I wrote it because people wanted more of the series and then I started to feel like oh my gosh, what if this is in the book they want and what the book was already written and of course I knew the story I wanted to tell or I would never have I wouldn't have just written a book just to write it. Um But I actually went on facebook one day, I was like what do you want to make sure you see in christmas and Peachtree blood? Because I thought what if there's like some secondary character that I don't really think it's unimportant, but they all love or you know what if and anyway my editor laugh so hard that she was like writing by committee, like such a good idea. That's definitely what used to do. But you know when you have a series like that that people are really invested in, you do want to give them. I mean obviously it's your story and you're telling what you want to tell and advancing in the way you want to, but I think it's so funny that they're like these little things like there was a dog in the series and um we had sort of killed the dog off and people were...

...like, we want to know what this gets up to. And I was like, oh God, like biscuits dead, we better we better playing this way back biscuit funeral. Do we have a biscuit funeral in Peachtree? Well, it's made it work. I just did what little will? Little will was like, I don't think you should kill off biscuit. We discussed it and he was like, it was like, I need a biscuit really needs to, you know, still be in there. So anyway. Well, I do have a question in there somewhere though. So while your novels are technically mysteries, you leave a lot of really great family dynamics and settings into them. And in fact I said this already, but you know, you did grow up in the south, we grew up in the same county, which is so fun. So how do you think your southern upbringing influence your writing? Oh, I think it totally influenced it because just the way that I think, you know the way that that words come to my brain and just the way that I've uh the way I think it's just, it's completely southern, everything's completely southern. The the things my mother put on the table, the things she said that the things my grandmother said, you know, just, I don't know, you guys know, I mean everything that is the south, you're sort of like steeped in it, you're sort of marinated in it. And so what comes out of you is just the same. You know, it's sort of manifest itself in what you and what you write because that's just who you are. You sort of answered this, but I don't know if there's anything specific you can think of, but do your real life experiences ever make their way into your fiction? You think? Well, some of them do actually, especially the ones that are family related now, I always say I don't write about real people and I don't, but but there are glimmers of my parents, especially that sort of make their way into these books and Lizzy's parents, characters thinks that my dad does. I mean, I don't make him the character, you know, frank talbot, but I do take things that he's done and weave them into the story and I have a lot of fun with that. He'll never know. He doesn't read novels, but my mom gets a big kick out of it. So in that sense, I've used things that have happened to me. I've never met a killer that I know of. Um, but I've always enjoyed mysteries. I grew up wanting to be nancy drew. That was my very first career goal. My parents frowned on that. But anyway, I, I do use things that are sort of minor things like, um, uh, slice of life things and, and recipes and, you know, things that mom cooks and things that might have happened to church or whatever. I use those things, but the mysteries themselves. Oh, that's made up of whole cloth. None of that is anywhere close to true felt when, when you first started this series, right in the very beginning, I...

...have a couple questions about it. I want to know about the nameless Talbot. We were joking about your middle name, but which goes along with the question, did you know you were going to be living with her for all of these books? So why did you name or Liz Talbott? And then um did you know that this would keep going and going? Was what did you mean for it to be a series? Yeah, I didn't mean for it to be a series. Um, Liz Talbott, I chose that name because I always liked the name, Liz, I don't know why I just liked the name and let's Talbot is sort of my avatar, you know, I sort of live vicariously through her, it's like playing a video game, I make her do the things that I think I should. I let her do fun things I'd like to do. I'd love to live, you have a beachfront house, so she has one because I think that would be fun. So I sort of made her my like perfect version of me and this alternate universe who's younger and thinner and and all that um better, better hair, better skin, better, you know? But um yeah, but Talbot's that last name I took right off the clothing store because I love it that time. I was I was curious that that's awesome. I bought so many clothes there and so I just loved it and I, so, and I stole it. That was just like the church on Sullivan's island. I stole the name, Stella Morris off the church for my, um, you know, so yeah, I swiped things. Um, there's a great book called, um, oh, I'm gonna blank on the real title. But it's something about that. The best artists steal that. You take things and then you make them your own. So it's not really stealing. So you know, exactly. You took it and there's nothing new in the world. So that's how you started. But where do you suggest or recommend your readers start a new reader who's coming to the series. Where do you think they should start? Always at the beginning with low country boil. Um, just because the characters lives unfold throughout the series. Now, the mysteries the books are, are self contained mysteries. There's a self contained mystery in every book. So you're not going to be lost as far as clues and and and the mystery and that kind of thing. But listen Nate their story unfolds, you know, and and everyone else and that sort of the townspeople, you know, her family, her friends, all of that, their lives unfold over the course of the series. And so I think readers would be missing out if they started in the middle. Although some tell me they have and they were fine. Um I think they'll be happier if they start at the beginning. Okay. Do you have more from ledge? I do plan to write more Liz. Um And it's interesting because I I started the next list book and then part way through I decided that this uh particular book needed a different...

...detective and I've had this other detective sort of in my mind for a while. And so I started playing with something new and and and so I'm working on something new. So exciting. Oh, that's what's next for you. Okay, so there will be more Liz but there's also a new detective coming up and then I have a women's fiction novel in my head that I've been playing with for years and I keep saying I'm going to write but I don't know, I keep gravitating back to the mysteries and so I think it's like the new mystery and then lives and then the women's fiction book which is loosely based on like 87 things that happened to me in one year. And yeah, get them to like different characters because no one will believe all these things happen to one person. Hey Susan. One of the questions most popular questions we are always asked wherever we go, where do you get your inspiration? You know I get from from everywhere. It could just be the tiniest thing that somebody says and it pops into my head and especially with the mysteries. I just, I have this overactive imagination and I started thinking what if, you know, like, like normal people see things in a certain way. You know, they, and they'll drive by a couple stopped by the side of the road. Uh, and I think I hope they have a cell phone. I hope Triple A is on the way or whatever and I think he's going to kill her and drag her off in the woods. It's going to be on the news tomorrow. They're never gonna find your body because that's just the way my head works. So americans head works. Yeah. This, this I think is a part of a southern upbringing. It's everything is a catastrophe. Oh, it's not just a tire, it's not just a flat tire. No, I love that. Well, your overactive imagination has served us all very well. So thank you for that. Um, and Susan, we have a lot of writers on this page and since you obviously have had an incredibly successful career and many, many more great ideas to come, Do you have a killer writing tip that you'd be willing to share with us? Well, I'm certain I don't have anything that you all haven't already thought of, but I will share this because uh, and something patty just said, maybe think of it when you, you take things that that happened and you or you take it and you make it your own. Um, I do this shamelessly all the time, things that people say, and I used to have trouble remembering them, you know, because things were just popping in my head and I wanted to write it down. But I'm like doing something where I can't like, you know, write it down or whatever. And so what I started doing is keeping notes, like the notes app in my iphone. Um and and it's on my desktop and so like I have one for snippets of conversation that I over here for for words that I just like that somebody uses that, I think, oh, I like that word, I want to...

...use that word, you know? Um or if a story idea pops in my head, I put it all in notes and then they show up on my desktop when I open my computer and then I remember, oh, I wanted to do something with this or wanted to do something with that. And I don't lose as much as I used to lose just by using notes, which I have my phone with me nearly all the time. So it's fairly easy to just either type it or dictate it and then I can go back and retrieve it and I'm losing less. We oh we just lost Christie for a second. I'm sure she'll pop back on. So one of my favorite books on writing is Bird by Bird by an LaMotte. It is such a great book. And in there, she's always talking about always have a note pad and a pencil with you because you never know. And of course when she wrote that she didn't know that we always have this, right? And so I was driving today and um I pulled over and put some did audio in some notes because I thought of something, so I didn't even need a notebook. So I love that tip because we always think we're definitely going to remember that. And then I think I remember and I never do but I didn't realize that you could have I mean this is really dumb and I'm literally seeing it right here. I had no idea that the notes from your phone could just go straight to your desktop like that. So that's so you are wrong. Susan. That is definitely something that that really helps me. I don't know about everybody else but we really ask for writing tip for us. We don't it's selfish way along with writing tips. We're always looking to add to our to be read piles and I think one of our favorite things about doing friends in fiction is that we have found books we wouldn't have found otherwise. We've read books we wouldn't have read otherwise. So what are you reading and Loving lately? Okay so I just finished the one you're with by Lauren Kay didn't which I really loved, I loved her she I love that book. She just does Family so well and that's actually the first book of course that I've read but she just relationships so well and I'm thinking now I want to go back and read everything that she's written so I'm looking forward to that. Um I just also finished um what's the book everybody's talking about? The last thing he told me and you know and I should know better because in the beginning it tells you there's a heartbreaking ending and and it is a great book but there's a heartbreaking ending. I knew that going in and then I was disappointed that there was a heartbreaking ending because I like books in Happy. So it was a great book but everyone's reading it apparently. But I've told them that when I was...

...reading Ellen Hildebrand's 28 Summers you know, you know, you're going into it, it's gonna be a heartbreaking ending. So I got there were like two chapters left and I just had to put it away for a little while because I was like I'm not emotionally prepared, I know what's coming, like I can't handle it right now, so I'm just gonna have to wait and I waited like four days or the last two chapters was okay, you've got this, you can do it go mary Kay you talk a lot about about happy endings versus heartbreaking endings and you think about that when you're writing, don't you? Yeah, that's what I'm aiming toward um like Susan Yeah, sometimes you know sometimes um it isn't the happy ending readers anticipate but I um that's a gift I want to give them that sort of my unspoken promise with my readers. I'm a big fan of a happy ending to and sometimes, like, every now and then, you know, I'll get a review that said, like, this ending was so predictable and I want to be like, I would love to have read this review if it wasn't like, if that thing didn't happen, I would love to have read the review then, because that would have been a really horrible, horrible mean book. Why did biscuit have to die? It's a dog killer. It wasn't like the dog got run over on page or anything, it just it just it happened earlier, but not anyone, well, I don't think it has been resurrected. Oh my gosh, okay, so he's gonna be okay the dog, it's gonna be okay. There's there is, you know, it lives now, people are going to be like, where is the scene where the dramatic rushed to the vet seen? None of that happens. It's just biscuit wasn't in the book and now he is and that's it. There's no dramatic storyline, He isn't christmas Peachtree bluff, so you know that he's there, I get that to the readers will ask, Liz, has a dog, Red a golden retriever, and and readers will ask about the dog, and what I have found is that I cannot leave Red alone too long or or readers will say, you know, you know, I feel bad for Red, he's been alone too long, so I have to be very careful to make sure that Liz has plenty of time and her scheduled to get back home and take care of it and if she hasn't because she's in charleston for a stakeout or whatever, then I have to make sure that her sister is going by to take care of the dog. Oh my gosh! She's like solving a murder. But it needs to get home. Someone has to, someone has to take care of the dog is amazing. Well okay so now it's time for our lightning round, lightning round. But Susan, you don't really have to answer these...

...quickly, you can make them as faster, slow as you would like. They're just a little bit shorter questions. So mine is, who would you invite to your fantasy dinner party? Oh wow! Um Oh that's hard, hard, hard fantasy. You know what? Honestly? Right now for a variety of reasons my husband, just just the two of us, that's my fantasy right now. I love that, awesome. I've never ever heard anyone say that too. That's adorable. I love I love it. Nobody has ever said they wanted to invite my husband to their dinner family or me. He's funny. Hey, here's a good one, Susan! If you could give one piece of advice to your younger self, what would it be? Oh, be patient. You know, just be patient. Just take your time and and just be patient. Just don't try to do everything right now. Just take a breath. That's what I mean. Don't rush into things. I was, It's A Good one. If you had a one year, all expenses paid trip to anywhere in the world, where would you go? Oh ST john I love ST john in the virgin islands. That's just my, that's my happy place. I love every beach and I love the south Carolina coast of course, but, but somebody's paying for it. Yeah, ST john it's going to be Some Big Virgin Islands ST two. I would come visit you Susan. I think we should do this. We should do that. We've got to find someone to pay for the all expenses paid. But other than that we're good. Yeah I'm trying to ask this woman a lightning Rory to tidy. Sorry sorry. I know. Hey Susan if you weren't a writer what would your dream career b oh gosh I can't think of anything else I would like to. Well okay if I if I would work in a bookstore it would be something with books because I just love books I couldn't write I would have to be in a bookstore. Love that you write about the low country obviously. Do you have any other settings you have dreamed of writing about her exploring in your work? Honestly this is a boring answer. But no I just I love the low country. We lived in my pleasant for a while and where we were. I could like ride my bike to Sullivan's Island and ride my bike down the beach and come home and I did that virtually every day after I dropped the kids off at school and I just love that. And we ended up moving back to Greenville and it's a long story, but I just I love the low country. That's my that's my happy place. That's a great answer. I love that answer. Well, Susan, thank you so much. Stick around for another minute because because we have one more question for you before you go. But we have a couple of announcements. We wanted to remind everybody out there about a few things. First of all, if...

...you haven't heard Friends and Fiction has partnered with Oxford Exchange to offer exclusive friends and fiction merchandise. We have adorable soft t shirts, Mine cities and coffee tumblers and some really amazing products on the way. Also we wanted to remind you that supporting indie booksellers is one way to keep communities up and running this week. Foxtail Book shop as we already mentioned, is our featured store and they are offering all of our books in one convenient link link for easy shopping. And don't forget we have a podcast and it isn't just the shows we have in every friday podcast. We've partnered with librarian Ron Block and so we're so clever or cap mary Kay is so clever. It is called Writer's Block podcast with Ron Block and we have had the most fascinating people on and we have a brand new episode every single friday, this coming friday, he talks to Virginia Willis right? Yes, yes. About her new book. So we're really excited and usually one of us is on there, if not more than one. So we do with him. Yeah. Plus a bonus Plus a bonus author. Um, did you know that patty mary. Kay and I all have winter books releasing. We have partnered with our friends at Nantucket Book Partners to create a special winter wonderland subscription box where you will receive all our new releases as they release. Plus a special exclusive friends and fiction mug and hot chocolate. So visit Nantucket Book Partners for more information and we will also have that information available on our facebook page. All right, Susan, you're up one more time before we you go. We have a question. We love to ask all of our guests. And that is what were the values around reading and writing in your household when you were growing up? Oh well my mother read to me from the time I was, I can't even remember I was, I was way young when she started reading to me. So reading was always part of our lives. She was just a voracious reader herself. She read to me. I always watched her with a book in her hands. So I was reading at a very early age and was just craving books because that's what she did and because she read to me so much. So we were readers always. That's that's awesome cheeks. Well thank you so much for joining us, Susan. We have so thank you for interrupting your vacation. Yes. Plus we really appreciate it to everyone out there. Do not forget you know it's christmas in july and we're all talking about christmas book. So don't forget to pick up Susan's latest low country bows of holly or if you haven't started this wonderful series yet. Start at the very beginning with low country boil. Thank you Susan, thanks so much for having me. This has...

...been so much fun. It's great to see all of you and everybody go to the low country book Oh you'll love it. It's so great. The great little corner of the internet. It is, it is. Um thanks to all of you. Thanks ladies. That was so much fun. I loved being with you guys. She's so interesting the way she started that series kept with the Low Country and then build a whole book club around it. So cool. It's amazing and it sounds like she has a lot of great new things coming out. So I love that and I love a series. I'm very, especially now I don't know what it is but I just I'm really into things where like I can just go right back into that world where I've already been. You already know the characters. Yeah, there's something really comforting about that and I think we need that right now. So anyway, I mean people come to all the time mary Kay don't they? Until you missed the Callahan? Probably because of the name but they missed the Callahan. Okay, well and I hear them all the time so I don't want another wheezy and BB book constantly. Are you going to write another Easy and B B like I see that everywhere. Alright ladies, well y'all are the greatest all of you out there. You all are really the greatest. Thanks so much for joining us tonight and every night for this special behind the book episode of Friends and Fiction. We will see you Wednesday night live at seven p.m. Right here with Lauren Willig See you then. Goodnight, Goodnight. Thank you for tuning in, join us every week on facebook or Youtube where our live show airs every Wednesday night at seven p.m. Eastern time, and please subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram, We're so glad you're here.

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