Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 month ago

Friends & Fiction with Tasha Alexander & Andrew Grant

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

F&F is pleased to welcome husband and wife thriller writers Tasha Alexander and Andrew Grant. They discuss their life on a wildlife preserve in Wyoming, Tasha's bestselling Lady Emily mystery series, their own "meet cute" at a hotel bar at a literary festival, and, of course, Andrew's role in co-writing and taking the mantle of the beloved and mega-bestselling Jack Reacher series from his brother, Lee Child. Hear about Tasha's latest book THE DARK HEART OF FLORENCE and Andrew's latest Jack Reacher novel, BETTER OFF DEAD.

Welcome to Friends and fiction for newyork times, Bestselling authors, endless stories, novelists, mary Kayandrews. Kristen Harmel, Christie Woodson harvey and paddy CallaghanHenry, R four longtime friends with more than 70 published books betweenthem together. They host friends and fiction with author interviews andfascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight andsupport independent bookstores. They discussed the books, they have writtenthe books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love booksand you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hello? Hello. So it is Wednesday nightand that means it's time for my favorite our of the week. Welcome tofriends and fiction. We have so much to look forward to tonight. I'm ChristineHarmel, I'm Christine Whitson Harvey, I'm patty Callahan Henry, I'm mary KayAndrews and this is Friends and fiction for new york times, bestselling authors,endless stories to support indie bookstores. Tonight we'll meet Tashaalexander and Andrew Grant to acclaimed new york times bestselling novelistswho also happened to be married to each other. This is the second husband andwife team we've hosted after john Truby and Leslie lair last month and I'm soexcited to dive in with them. We'll talk about each of their new books aswell as what it's like to be married to another successful writer, how theyinfluence each other's work. What it's like to live in a log cabin in Wyomingand what's up next for each of them. Yeah. And we have partnered with war X inbeautiful California as our featured independent bookstore for the month ofoctober works as the country's oldest continuously family owned and operatedbookstore. So we see them as an ideal partner for our mission here on fN ffriends and fiction. By the way, we're encouraging you to shop local and shopsmall by buying from works over the course of the next few episodes ofFriends and fiction. And we will also ask you to look at the specialopportunities along the way and browse their selection, which also includesour books as well as the latest by tonight's guest Tasha alexander andAndrew Grant. And we have a kind of cool announcement to make tonight. I'mgoing to say it's more than kind of cool. I'm gonna say it's super cool.You already know that you can watch us live each week on Facebook and YouTubeand that if you want to see any of our previous episodes, 90 of them werecoming up on our 100 they're all cataloged on our YouTube channel. Well,starting this friday, you can also catch us on a brand spanking shiny,fancy new platform. And when we say brand new, we mean like right now it iscalled local plus it specializes in locally produced content and itlaunches this friday right now. Today at this moment while you're listening,you can sign up to watch online and in the next few weeks there will be an appavailable on IOS and android android and Andrew Andrew, that's our bestandroid two. It's a great place not only to find our best of episodes andnew episodes each week, but also to find other cool content such as brandnew good news show from our september guest, former CNN anchor Daryn Kagan.It will eventually cost a few dollars a month to access the service. But if yousign up this week, the 1st 60 days starting when it launches this fridaywith us, you are absolutely free to try it out. Sean is going to put up thelink below and we really encourage you to sign up right now. It helps supportlocal businesses and is founded by some really smart women and we're so happyto be a part of their launch and we hope you'll join us to see what elseyou can discover on their streaming service. So sign up at go Loco plus andwe will see you there. Yeah, we're so excited about that. Thanks for tellingus about it, Patty Speaking of cool new things you'll definitely want to beinvolved in. Tonight is a night where you will want to stay until the veryend of the show because we will be showing you at the bottom of the hourthe cover reveal of the home records...

...mary Kay's brand new novel, which willbe out on May 3rd 2022. You guys are not gonna want to miss this. The coveris amazing and we cannot wait to hear mary Kay tell us about the book. It'sgonna be so fun. It is. Yeah. And you know every week we partner with Parademagazine online this week, Kristen reflected on something that just blowsmy mind. I know this is so something that I never, in a million years wouldhave had the courage to do. But he talks about her decision to move toparis on a whim in her early twenties, the most impulsive thing she's everdone. Which is good because moving to 100 country with a stranger on a win isit's pretty important you're gonna find a link to our and our instagram bio butmeanwhile Kristen, can you tell us about it? Yeah, just very briefly andactually I was thinking what a perfect discussion topic this is tonightbecause I think Tasha has also you know Tasha and Andrew who are our gueststonight I think have done some really extraordinary things such as leapinginto this home in Wyoming which I think was a big life change for them. Sowe'll talk a little bit about that. But yeah, when I was in my early twentiesyou can read the essay. I don't have to recap it for you. But basically I movedto paris on a complete whim I didn't speak french. I had no idea what I wasleaping into but I think Sean, I think you have the picture of what the viewfrom my window actually was. I mean I didn't know if I was walking into likea murder house that you know, I was never going to come back from. But itturned out to be this that was my view. And it changed my life and changed my,my career. And I think sometimes I forget about the value of beingimpulsive, sometimes not always having to know the next step. Um and as I putit, the essay leaping before you look every once in a while. So I'm wonderingfrom the three of you, has there ever been a time that you've done somethinga little bit impulsive, a little bit out of character that turned out to beexactly the leap you needed? Well, some of my impulsive things Idon't want to talk about, but but there was a time when, when my youngest songraduated from college and it was the first time I was going to be alone inthe house. I mean with my husband, but in 20 something years and so I appliedthinking there's no way I'll get it for this trip. It was a hiking trip toIreland and you had to write an essay and you had to be accepted and hundredsof people applied and I thought there's no way I'm going to get it, but I'mjust gonna do it and I was accepted and when I got it I thought I'm not going,I can't go by myself to Ireland and then I did and it was one of the bestthings I have ever done. It's life changing. It is it is. How about youmary, Kay? You know, I had, I'm struggling to think about when, whenwas the last time I've done something just totally impulsive. I'm notnormally a reckless person. So I haven't, I don't know if I've done anythingreckless. I was thinking about, what have I done anything like that? Maybe.Um, when I adopted my pseudonym and I was working on Savannah Blues, we weregetting ready to remodel our house in, in Atlanta and I announced to myhusband and family because we weren't going to have a kitchen. I said, okay,I'll, I'm moving to Savannah for the summer to work on the book. That would becomeSavannah Blues. And so I said he's out, y'all, I rented a friend, it's myapartment and the first time I'd ever lived alone in my life, wow, I'd alwaysshared a bedroom with my sister and I went to college and then my room. Nextroommate was my starter husband. I've never lived alone. So I guess that's, Iguess that's as impulsive as I get, I might have to loosen up, keep hangingout with us. Yeah, exactly. That's right there. I think I'm kind of, Idon't know if impulsive is the right word, maybe just like decisive and Iwill make these big decisions kind of, that I think to other people, itdoesn't look like I thought them through, but I'm just like, no, I know,I know that's that's the thing now. Nothing huge like moving to paris oranything, but so there's like a lot of things that I could say or think about.But honestly all I think the show, I mean we all made a very impulsivedecision jump into this thing that like took over in a way, our lives. Yeah.And we all just like every day we keep saying yes, you know, and I thinkthat's really the thing that I think about, especially like during this past,you know, a couple of years where there hasn't been a lot of opportunity to belike, let's you know, hope on the cruise. You know, you can't really soimpulsive in a pandemic. So I think...

...that's a good one. I really do. And itjust goes to show like what Kristin wrote about that sometimes there's bigleaps end up being the best things that ever happened to us. Ah that's so true,You're right. This has been so wonderful and you're right. It was aleap at the beginning and it continues to be a leap, right? Plus we're like, yeah, can we do it?Exactly. Tasha and Andrew, let's go for it. Exactly. Exactly. Exactly. So toall of you out there, we would love to hear your stories to if you have anexample of a time you have left without looking and really felt like it was theright choice. Put it in the comments or you know, tell us about it. Um underannouncements on our facebook page we always love to hear from you. It meansso much to us. So now without further ado let's talk about our incredibleguests Tasha alexander and Andrew Grant. Tasha is the daughter of two philosophyprofessors. She is the author of the long running Lady Emily series as wellas the novel Elizabeth The Golden Age, which is the novelization of the 2000and seven Universal Pig pictures film starring Cate Blanchett's. Did I saythat? Right Blanchett's, Tasha studied english literature. Yeah, that's howyou say right. Tasha studied english literature and medieval history at theUniversity of Notre Dam and now she lives in South I think it's actuallyNotre Dame. And now she lives in Southeastern Wyoming with her husbandwho happens to be today's other guest novelist. Andrew Grant. Andrew Granthails from Birmingham England and after studying english literature and dramaat the Drama at the University of Ship. It's hard to say drama. Sometimes youwant to say drama but don't don't do that dom instead of Notre dame. Well,but they're both are correct. They're just defense true true prom. Er hefounded and ran he also University of Sheffield, he founded and ran a smallindependent theater company which, among other things appeared at theworld famous Edinburgh Fringe festival. He then worked in telecommunicationsfor 15 years, he finally before finally making the transition to becoming anovelist. In addition to being married to Tasha alexander. He is the youngerbrother of novelist James Grant, whom the world knows as lee child In january2020 child announced that he intended to retire from his enormously popularJack Reacher book series and then Andrew would take over. So he is nowwriting that series under the pen name Andrew Child. How cool! Right, Howexciting is that? Harry Hey, you can have some stuff to talk about aboutpseudonyms. That's awesome. So we have so much to talk about tonight with bothof these fascinating guests sean can you bring Tasha and Andrew on Hi guys, I just want I just want tostop everything. And mary kate tells everything about home records. I knowwe're talking about your books, that's the point of this evening, your bookswe want to hear and your life. Exactly. So Tasha and Andrew were so excited tohave You were so happy you're here. Tasha, could you begin by telling usabout the dark heart of Florence, which I believe is the 15th novel in YourLady Emily series, which will be out in paperback this coming Tuesday. Amazing.Yeah, I can't I can't believe it's already coming out in paperback thisbook. It's it's funny because when I went to Florence research the book innovember of 2019, I actually got really sick while I was there and I'm prettysure I was like patient zero in Tuscany with Covid. Oh my gosh, all right, moreskinny. Um it wasn't you was going to be someone. So when I write it all goesback to this woman, I was sitting on a plane about seven days beforehand, butthat's that's another long boards for it. Uh this book, I I got reallyinterested while I was doing the research on this. I wasn't sure what Iwanted to do with it. And I think anybody who writes a long runningseries gets this. You want to bring something fresh the characters. Andwhen I was doing, when I was kind of delving into the research, I usuallystart by looking at a place and then looking at historically what washappening there at the time. Uh and I had decided I settled on Florence, butwhat really captivated me. My protagonist Emily, her husband Colin,who's indescribably handsome and a dashing covert agent of the Crown. He'sbasically single handedly keeping the...

...british um fire going. Uh The book thatEmily is part of the book is set in 1903 and at that time in Britain weregetting into things that are leading to the First World War and what I learnedwas that the british public fueled catalyzed by the tabloid press, doesthis sound familiar? Um yeah, was was really being spoon fed this idea thatGermany was horrible evil and like they were trying to invade Britain, which ofcourse was really not the case yet, but there was a whole uh movement in inwriting where people writing these books that were about german spies inBritain around the turn of the century. And funnily enough, and notsurprisingly, once you get post World War One, we learned that there wereliterally no spies, german spies in Britain before the war, but it justreally kind of shows you how people believe this. They believed it was nottrue again, does this sound familiar? Um so I was really taken with this ideaof a group of sensibly intelligent connected, engaged people Going downthis rabbit hole of believing that their country was full of German spies.And so that was gonna set me off on the path for this book. Um and then thereis a second storyline because we always have Emily and this is 1903, but um ifyou're going to write about Florence, you really do want to write about therenaissance. And so the secondary timeline in the book follows the storyof a young woman who is living during in Florence during the renaissance umgoing through the time when Savonarola really this just mad and insane monk umstirs up the population to start destroying the art and the literatureand the beautiful things that that made the renaissance, the renaissance. So,see I'm not really good at explaining a book, I kind of have to write the book.No, you explain to her. Yeah, and I'm the same way I feel like I but Ithought that was great, That was fantastic. And I'm excited to talk toyou in a minute, just about the idea for that whole series because I thinkit's so such an interesting idea and so different from what other people aredoing. I love it. But before we get to that Andrew, can you tell us a littlebit about better off Dead, the 26th installment of the Jack Reacher series,which I believe will be out october 26. Absolutely, yeah, that's that's thelaunch date and we're, you know, we're very excited about it because we justhad such a fun time writing it, you know, the last to my brother and Iwrote together and we, you know, when when he made the decision to to sort ofbring me on board, it's a kind of gradual retirement for him, um he had acouple of things that he wanted to try to do a couple of sort of slight coursecorrections we wanted to make. So with the first book last year's book, thesentinel, we had those in mind, you know, we we had a couple of things thatwe wanted to achieve, which is very unusual for him because he's famous fornever outlining never planning just coming up with a good opening sentencereally not even an opening scene and then just taking it from there andseeing where it goes. So the sentinel, we had a couple of things we wanted todo and we felt like we we achieve those things. So this time around we didn'thave that, you know, hanging over us, we could just come up with a funbeginning and run from there. And so what I did was I kind of secretly wrotethis introduction, this this first chapter and and sent it to him to seewhat he, what he thought about it. And I came up with this idea of a scenethat was right on the border between Arizona and Mexico where a huge hugeguy was waiting for a kind of clandestine meeting. And uh it'ssupposed to be with one person. But actually four people showed up andthese four people came, had the misguided idea that they could, theycould get the better of the enormous stranger and turned out not so well forthem. Um but then another person arrived out of the shadows shot thestranger in the chest. And the next scene is the morgue in the, in thelittle town where this giant figure is on the slab and they examine his, hispossessions and he doesn't have very many. All he has is that he's got anATM card. He's got an expired passport, he's got a few dollars and he's got afolding toothbrush and when they opened the passport to the, to the informationpage it gives the name Jack non reacher.

So you know, it starts out with Jack onthe slab and if you want to know how we got there and what happens next, I'mafraid you're gonna have to buy the book caesar. Okay. That's the ultimatetease. Right? Yeah. That's the ultimate yeah. The ultimate hashtag by my book.Dammit. Okay. Andrew uh you know, it's fascinating and rare to take over aseries from a living author the way you've done here and I can't imaginepicking up the mantle from a sibling. Especially considering that I read aquote from you saying that when you started out writing, I spent all mytime trying not to sound like lee child. I love that idea. I can only imagine Ihave a younger sister who is a playwright and I can't imagine her everever wanted to do anything that I wanted that I've done. But I love theidea that sometimes we don't know where the road will lead and I wish you wouldtell us about how your brother approached you to take first of all, doyou call him lead, you call him by his real name? How does that work? Yeah, Imean I've got, it varies honestly, you know, I normally try to avoid his namealtogether and just save my brother are just calling, I that's okay but no oneneeds to really worry about anymore you know. I know but you know I think Iactually met lee the very first time I was doing a book that before my firstbook came out and so he was always lied to me and then once we got together Ineeded to call him jim and that was really hard for very good. Yeah but Imean what happened honestly was We uh in the graphic that flashed up earlieryou had the last book that I wrote on my own the the second in my for McGrathseries which is called too close to home. And that book came out there itis that book came out in January 19. So um because we live you know after wemoved to Wyoming um you know my brother thought we were crazy, couldn'tunderstand what we were thinking moving from Chicago to here. So he came out tohave a look and after he'd been here about half an hour he said hey arethere any other houses for sale around here? Oh my gosh he actually bought theone that he's now next door but one neighbor. So in Wyoming that means helives 3.5 miles away. So so I went too close to home came out because we're inSouthern Wyoming um they wanted to do the launch event at a bookstore inDenver in colorado called the tattered cover So I I called him up and said youknow if you want to come to this event with me and he said yeah sure. And sowe figured it made more sense just to go in one car and he wanted to go inhis car so that he could smoke. So he drove us down there and you know whatit's like when you're getting really do an event or you're really thinkingabout is the event you're thinking. I hope I don't say anything ridiculous. Ihope I don't forget my own name, I hope I don't trip over my feet on the way tothe stage. Yeah, exactly. I was totally focused on the event, fortunately itwent pretty well. But then on the way back he said to me all right, well Idrove down, you drive back and it's only later when I see how carefully heplanned this whole thing because it's january and we're in Northern Coloradocrossing into Southern Wyoming so the weather is horrendous. We've got thisground blizzard going on where there's this snow and ice exploring horizontalin front of the car. We cannot see a thing. I said to him when we, when weleft I said you know it's 50 50 whether we wind up at home or whether we windup in a ditch a wise person would have just got a hotel but others do not geta hotel. Now we will soldier on, we set up to dr hopes that we were drivinghome, there was no debate. So I'm driving along and I'm having to focusreally hard, I'm not crashing the car and just sort of very casually mybrother says to me, you know, I'm thinking of retiring and so if I was anice person, I would have said to him, yes, absolutely, you should retire,you've worked so hard for all of these years, you've brought all of thispleasure to all of the readers who love your books. You know, you should justtake some time, enjoy the fruits of your labor and have a lovely retirement,but I'm not a nice person. So instead I said to him, you mean retire, what'sgoing to happen to reach her because you know the things I'm the oldestreacher fan in the world, I was the The...

...first person to have ever read areacher book, you know, because you know the boot 25 years ago was on theother foot. I had a really good job in the telecoms industry and he was out ofwork and broke and you know, he decided that the way he was going to fix thisproblem of having no money was to write books because we all know that's a goodidea, right? Yeah, that's tracked a massive, well you do with all thoseyachts, so many, many, many money, you writes the first breach of book killingfloor and it's on yellow paper written in pencil. And he sends it to me toread because he knows that I'm really the only thriller reader in the family.And I remember looking at the opening the envelope, looking at the first pagebecause I'm terrified for two reasons because I'm thinking what if the bookis terrible, I'm going to have to call my big brother and say, listen, I'msorry, but your book sucks. Who wants to do that? I didn't want to do that.But then it could be a practical consideration too because if it had, hehad no job. So what was gonna happen with, I'm gonna have to send him foodparcels, you know, was I going to have to let him bedroom, you know, what wasgonna happen? So luckily the book, I didn't have to say those things and youknow, the rest was history, but I've been a reach a fan for more than aquarter of a century. Um, you know, and reach a had almost become like a kindof extra imaginary brother. You know, when we hung out together, we wouldalways say, what would reach you do about this? What would reach you doabout that? What would he, you know, something would come on the news orwe'd see something happening at a baseball game or a soccer game and wesaid, well, what would reach you do about that. So it's this entity that'skind of existed between us for all of these years and I just couldn't standthe idea that there wouldn't be any more reach your books and I certainlycouldn't stand the idea that it would be my fault, that there were no morereach your books. So really that was that was what hit the balance with me.The other thing was, I can't quite remember how he phrased it, but it wasalmost like a kind of challenge involved in what he said. You know,maybe maybe you'd like to join me or maybe you'd like to start writingsomething like that and whatever it was, it struck me as a bit of a challengeand I'm terrible if anything is like a challenge. I've got myself into so muchtrouble over the years, you guys were talking about the things that you did,that we're impulsive or whatever for me, the things that have been that havecaused me the most grief have always been. The things that are standard,like a challenge that I couldn't walk away from. Yeah. When I was left on mydad would, if there was something he thought I couldn't, there was a bit ofa challenge. He would always say, oh no, Andrew never be able to do that. Andthat meant, you know, I would do it twice and take photographs and it wasonly when I was older that I realized, well alone what what he was doing. Soyes, it was bad. It was all in the in his car driving but driving back fromthat book event and it was a while ago now. And so we've got 200 belt. Well 11 is that in the world better after cut and we're already working on the on thenext one because he had this thing where he, you know he looked like Isaid he was on the he was he was out of work when he started writing. He gotfired from his job on august 31st. So he started writing killing floor onseptember the first. So he has this long running almost superstition, youknow this tradition that he has to start the next book on september 1st.So september 1st this year we started interesting. That's cool. Andrew whatis it like taking over and established series likethis. And I keep thinking about the reaction to fans after, you know in themovies, they cast Tom Cruise as a teacher in the movie. I mean my husbandis a major major uh reach your fan and he's like how how that mean they cast ahood ornament as reacher. How did a tournament male version of holly pocketdoll. Ben Tom Cruise. Okay, so first of all Tom Cruise is one of the first actorsthat we all know to be short right? And I think that maybe has something to dowith the jumping up and down on Oprah's couch. Yeah baby home. Yes, but butmost, most leading men are really short. In fact jim lee went to when they werefilming the first movie, he went to...

...paramount and was on the set and youknow at the studio and the costume mistress, like the head of costumes ofparamount pictures, brought him in to her department and gave him a jacketand he and she said put this on. So you know, jim is really tall, not quite astall as Andrew, but he's really tall. Uh so he's on and and the jacket comesup to like about here on him. Uh huh. Oh no. Oh no, that that's what happened with the jacket. Okay, I'm going to guess so what whatthe lady said was that jacket are that size because that's what most leadingmen are. Oh no, we lost them. Oh my gosh, I hope they come back. Howinteresting was that story though, about how he took over the series? Ithink that's amazing. Could you imagine doing that with the sibling? Like if ifJeannie came to me and said you know let's write it to be like what? Thatwould be crazy and Sean is pointing out in the comments we should address. Sothey're having a little bit of internet trouble. Um the they have satelliteinternet and uh and they've had a snowstorm I think they said today. Soum their internet is a little bit off right now. So hopefully they'll be ableto reconnect. That's why they're a little bit fuzzy. We're kind of tryingto make the best of it. So just letting you guys all know um do the cover ofyou. We could do that. You want to do that. Let's, you know, we like gocompletely off script. Yes. Let's row tonight is about being impulsive. Yeah.Before we look happy. This is your first lesson. This is your first lessonin doing it mary. Kay, can you that you could be more impulsive and yep, wereto grant your wish. You just push you to the edge of your comfort zone all ofthe days, right? Christine is manifesting intentions over there rightand left soon. We will have something amazing to tell you about and ourintentions that she has somehow manifested, right people what they want. Okay, Okay, sonow for the moment we've been waiting for the way this is me doing soundeffect way. I know, I know, but I'm being impulsive way. Not when you'rejet lagged. I know you're so jet lagged by the way, I don't So before we dothis moment we've been waiting for. I think this is what happens because letme just like I'm like checking on my phone and like the internet is working.This is what happens when you try to reveal that Clint Eastwood is alsoshort uh ba b star because so jim pulls on this jacket, it comes to his elbowor whatever. And she says that is the jacket one of the jackets that clintEastwood War in the Dirty Harry movies. And she said yours the thing withleading men, We are all within about 4" of each other. So, this idea that TomCruise Dwarf. Well, also, and I mean, li said this from the beginning,working with him, Tom read all of the books. Tom took this very, veryseriously calm, worked so hard. He showed up prepared. You know, I mean,we all have our issues with Tom Cruise, I guess. Like why do I have so manyissues with Tom Cruise? Like, I'm not really entirely because you know, it'seasy to have issues with him. I was I was on tour at the time that theannouncement came and I couldn't talk about anything at my events for my book.Except how short Tom Cruise was like, this is what we got going on. This iswhat we're doing that. I like a nice guy drew, how is it? Andrew um you know,taking over kind of iconic. I mean, were you at all intimidated by theexpectations or did you just say bring it on? Well, you know, your originalquestion was spot on because the first thing that came into my mind was thereaction with the song Cruise stuff for the movies. You know, I just thought,you know, the richer fans are so loyal and so passionate. You know, they havethese these kind of pretty violent reactions and I thought, you know, Idon't want to be on the wrong side of...

...that. But I also thought, I mean, youknow what, it's like writing a book, you've always got those voices in theback of your head, You know, you're imagining your editors saying, oh myGod, this is the stupidest thing I've ever read. You know, you're imaginingwhat the reviews you're going to get an amazon, you're imagining, you know, allof that stuff. And the only thing you can you can do is that out, right?That's all you can do. All you can do your it. So I tried to take thisapproach where I gave myself a certain period of time where I wouldacknowledge the fact that yet I was taking a risk and there could be anadverse reaction. And then I thought, okay, time you know, time out on thatthat goes in a box and it goes on the shelf and I'm not going to think aboutit anymore. All I'm gonna do is do the best job that I can and just hope thatit's it's good enough because you know, when there's pressure like that, whatcan you do about it, it's out of your control. You've just got to ignore itand and try and do your job. And that's what I did and I mean, yeah, that therewere, you know, I think probably the nicest thing that that came out of itwas that, you know, we, we, we've known for a little while about what we wereplanning to do before it became public. And the publishers wanted to controlthe narrative and wanted to, kind of, handle the way that the news was wasreleased. But before they could do that, somebody, a journalist somewhere foundout somehow and he leaked the story and it wound up in the, in the press, firstof all, in London and then it came over to the States. And so it was out there,there's nothing anybody could do to manage it or curate it or spin it. Youknow, it was just the news, this is what's happening. And what I reallyloved about that was that the majority of the responses were just so kind tomy brother. You know, they were, we love his books that he's, we've lovedreading them for all these years. We wish he would keep going. But hey, youknow, everybody needs to retire eventually and they were wishing himthe best. And I just loved that. It was, it was genuine. I think people couldtell that the story was, was just the story, it hadn't been, you know,adopted or or tarted up in any way by any pr people. It was just, it was justthe unvarnished truth. And so once they, you know, they had that lovely responseas far as my brother was concerned. And then, you know, there were a few kindof voices saying, well what's gonna happen is it is it going to be any good?Is it gonna be is Andrew going to ruin it? And then luckily the majority ofvoices that came back were saying, well we don't know, but give the guy achance, you know, wait until, wait until he's written one and see what youthink. And so, you know, I'm really grateful for the way that that happened.Because of course people were gonna be worried. It's natural as a change.People are worried, is it still going to be the same? Is it going to be asgood? And when I met the I had to meet the publishers in London and they wereasking me what was my what was my goal? And what I said, well, you know,because lee right from the very beginning, he always said it wasn'tabout him, it was about Reacher. He always wanted people to go to thebookstore, he wanted them to go and say, have you got the new Reacher? You know,not the specific title necessarily not him preacher. So I said, well my goalwould be um somebody, you know knew the next Reacher comes out, Somebody isrushing to the bookstore to buy it on their way home from work, but they getdelayed, you know, there's there's traffic problems whatever. By the timethey reach the bookstore there's only one copy left and that copy has beendamaged somehow. The cover has been torn off the spine is missing. The onlything that's left of the pages that contain the story. So they buy itanyway because they can't wait to read it and they go home and they stay upall night reading the book and they get to the end and they say well 27 28 29books in and it's just as good as ever. You know what I want is for them toeven notice the difference. It's just you know our father was irish so hecould get away with these things and he had this expression the same, onlydifferent you know and that's what I want. Yeah I want to I want people toread it and think well yeah just the same as ever. Just as good as ever. Idon't want anybody to think well you know this has changed or that's changedor you know I don't want them, I don't want to put my stamp on it. I don'twant to put my my you know my mark on it. I just wanted to be what my brothercreated and I I keep going for for as long as people wants us to keep going.But I think creature one of those really rare characters it has become soiconic and I think I can share this story that lee told us about a womanwho works in his agent's office who was in his agent is in Britain. So thiswoman is in line for coffee behind a quite elderly woman who is holding thenew lee child book and she says to the...

...woman, you know, I actually, I work inhis agent's office and the woman turns around and says what Jack's office and she said, oh no, no, no lee child,the author and she's like, well, but the authors, Jack Oh wow. Yeah, Well,you know, so the books are about Jack reacher, but but lee child rights them.And so the woman said she kind of paused for a minute and then she said,oh, you mean, you mean, Jack sits down with this lee child fellow and tellshim the story and he writes it tom Yeah, so I I guess the the idea is uhAndrew a seamless transition. Mhm. And I mean this iconic character, that's what, that's what your readerswant. Yeah, you you nailed it with their words seamless, you know, that'sexactly what we're trying to do and that is the difference really in whatwe're doing, is that, you know, there's plenty of examples of people who havecontinued long running series after the authors have died and some of them havedone a fantastic job, but there's always been a break and it's the personwho picks up the reins has always been chosen by you know, the estate or youknow, somebody else, not the author of themselves because they're so what wasdifferent is that you know, this was actually leaves choice. This is what hewanted. And you know, he he has this expression you know, he says that youknow, in every author there's that little 10% or whatever the percentageis a little there's a little bit of crazy in there. You know, you have tohave that little bit of craziness. And the thing is that you can learn thecraft, you can learn the techniques, all of that stuff. But that extralittle margin of crazy that has to come from within you and we have the sameDNA we we have the same crazy and that that is the difference. You know, andso you know, to emphasize that, you know, that's why we are doing the firstfew books together so that people will be reassured that it's not just to sortof falling off the edge of the cliff and then you know, popping up somewhereelse. You know, it's it's more like a relay race where one person hands thatonto another and there's that period of time where both of them have theirhands on it. And also why, you know, I just, you know, I agree to write withwith a pseudonym because we wanted to really stress that family connection,the fact that we are brothers. And it's not some random connection. It's notjust some commercial arrangement. It's one brother passing on to another tocontinue in exactly the same vein as they were doing before. When whenyou're als internet went out for a second. I was saying I can't imaginedoing it with my sister. But when you describe it that way, it's more um itdoes probably makes it more Seamus because you know each other so well andyou're both writing and you're both in there together. So it's fascinating.But Tasha, I want to talk to you for a second more than a second. Speaking ofwriting a successful series, you have written the very popular, we talkedabout it a second ago. Lady Emily mysteries a series. When did your firstone come out? When was the first Lady Emily 2005. Okay, okay. So you werewriting them when we met a series that currently stands at 15 books. It's ameticulously researched series of historical suspense set in VictorianLondon and then later in other places around the world. But during that sametime period and Tasha, it's really like unlike anything else out there, can youtalk to us about what makes this time period so perfect as both the settingfor mysteries and a sort of proving ground for ahead of her timeprotagonist. And while you're talking about that also the challenges becausethat's really far in the past. Like there's, You know what, 1908, 19, early1900s, most of the time. Yeah. At the first book was set in 1890, and Ipicked that year because that late victorian era is is to me endlesslyfascinating. You've got All of this social change happening, you know,you've got people coming up with radical ideas that, like, five yearolds shouldn't be working for 20 hours a day, things like that, and, you know,outrageous women thinking they should have the right to vote. Uh, so it'sthis crazy, we're in Crazy Women. Okay.

But, you know, I have a story for youabout this actually, I'm going to get off track, but I'm going to briefly,I'm going to try to be brief. I'll try to not write a novel about it. Um, Ihad one book set in there earlier, I think it was 18 94 5 maybe, that dealtwith a lot of the suffrage issues. And at that time, in real life, in Britain,there was this group of women called the Women's Liberal Federation, andthey were considered the most radical women, basically on the planet. Okay.And they had a schism in that year, because half of these incrediblyradical women, I thought that it was going too far to suggest that womenshould actually vote. I mean, you know, let's not get crazy here, right? Wewish the boundaries. Yes. And so, so, you know, victorian era is full of somany amazing historical figures who seem to spring from the womb asiconoclast fighting for women's rights, fighting for Children's rights, uh,fighting for social change. But the thing that always fascinated me aboutit is that you can have all those people, but until you get a groundswell, swell of support from the non iconic class, like the people who arealready comfortable, who are doing fine until those people start to turn aroundand say, hey, wait a minute, you know what the way things are isn't okay.Like we need to take a look at these things until you get that groundswell.You can't get wholesale social change. And so I wanted, when I was startingwriting this series, I wanted to think about what would it take and what wouldcatalyze a young woman who is comfortable who has everything shewants, what makes her go from being comfortable in her coddled upper classlife to saying a lot of these things aren't okay that we take for granted.And so that was kind of why I picked the time period. And also, you knowthat late victorian era, you've got the british empire. The sun never setsright. The sun never set on the british empire at that time. There was never amoment on planet earth where the sun wasn't shining on some part of theempire and we today can look back at this and say, not only that we know theempire isn't in fact going to last forever, but also that is going to comeup against the hard stop of World War One. We know this, they didn't theytruly believe that this was going to go on and on and on. And so I findsomething really poignant about that time that, you know the way we can lookat it nostalgically and say, well, we actually know what's coming. There wassome interesting legal aspects to that period to incentive woman. Well,absolutely. Because you go from during that late victorian era where womencan't own property separately from their husbands, you get married,everything goes to your husband. But then there comes a point with thewomen's property act where women, I mean, the craziness that women can ownthings separately from their husbands. So this is a really interesting, it's areally interesting time period. Well, and what's interesting is you didn'tmake her marginalized so that she had to buck the system. You made hercomfortable but still have enough, You know, guts to do and then keep doing itthrough 15 books. No, it's great, because you know, I think it's reallyinteresting to write about and think about the marginalized people. But Iwas really taken with this notion that you need those people, you need thosepeople who are comfortable, yep, to start getting things going if you wantactual change to happen. That's so interesting. That's a reallygood point. And now it just shows that everything is continuously relevant,right? I mean, everything that we're living the same things over and overagain. Um so far. Yeah. Sorry? No, I was just gonna say that, I think that'sone of the things about historical fiction that I have always loved isthat you know, if you start getting, if you're writing fiction and you startgetting didactic and people feel like you're judging them, that's not reallya good way to reach people and make them think about. But when you have thelens of history, everything is at arm's...

...length. And so we're not saying thateveryone now is doing this, but hey, this is what they were all doing thelast gilded age and of course we can all draw the conclusion, but it doesn'tfeel as accusatory. So I think there's a way that you can kind of, people aremore open to hearing it when they think it's not about them. They don't get asdefensive. Yes. Yeah. Well, of course we know the twoof you are married, but we would love to know your story. So can you tell usa little bit how you met and what it's like to be married to anothersuccessful author? Well, you know the way this happened really was that I wasat what we were both at a writer's cough at a book conference and I pickedhim up in the bar and anyone who's ever been to write knows that everythingthat is happening in the evening is happening in the bar and yeah, in thebar, I picked him up in the bar. There's a little bit more to it thanshe lets on. B I mean, you know, the stories, you know, it is actually true,but a little bit of background was it was the year before my first book cameout. And so I've been, I've been told, okay, you've got to start going tothese industry events, go to this conference that meat, you know, readersand reviewers and booksellers and everybody who's involved starts to tryto get your name known a little bit. So I go to this, you know, work out ofthis conference actually with my brother and we had had dinner, we had amassive speak dinner and we came out how in the conference later and we cameout and he wanted to go outside for a cigarette and you know, apart from him,I knew no one, I knew nobody really. All I wanted to do was just go outsidewith him when he had a cigarette. But I thought, no, that's stupid. I've comehere to work. I've got to start meeting people. I better get on with it. And heactually lee calls this camel, that changed the world. Yeah, I love it. SoI I tell him that I'll see him later. And I go and I figured I walked to the,to the entrance to the bar and in this particular hotel, the fire was enormousand it had a, you know, the actual bar down one side where you get your drinks,round tables all along the middle and then booths at the other side and itwas crammed full of people. I thought, oh God, I don't know anybody. What am Igoing to do? Because you know, in England, you just go up to people andsay, hi, let me tell you about me. You know, it's supposed to be properly. So, Ithink what, wait back up, where was the conference Baltimore Baltimore 2008, 8,2000 and eight. Yeah, So, so I think what I'll do is I'll go to the far endof the bar, right, I'll push my way through the crowd to the very far end,then I'll turn around and start making my way back and then even if I lose mynerve, I'll at least have to say excuse me or I'm sorry or something, you haveto at least two people, this is my, this is my plan. So I take one stepinto the room and then I see Tasha standing at one of these round tablesin the middle with a group of friends and I see her standing there and Ithink, right, the plan has changed, but the problem is what am I gonna do? Ican't just go up to this gorgeous girl, you know? So I think well what I'll do,I'm in a bar and I haven't got a drink so I'll go and order a drink and whileI'm waiting for it to come I'll think of something. So, you know, most barsin my life I've been to you know, you wait it seems like you wait half anhour for your drink to come. Right? So I think there'll be plenty of time. Butnow this particular bar, you know, I ordered a drink and a moment later it'sthere in my hand and I'm like, oh no, I haven't thought of anything yet. Thisisn't this is Sarah remember I look around and she's walking over towardsme. And so yeah, we were yeah anonymous. Is that I saw that he was onhis own and didn't know anyone and that he was rescuing him, right?Because that's what we single girls in bars do. We just uh for men who look alittle lonely and we tried to make them feel better, Right? I mean please that's what I see why the message. Butbut it was because we just started talking and that was it. I mean like wehaven't stopped talking since then. And I guess we've been chatting for aboutan hour and his brother came in and you know, I had known him for for threeyears, his brother more than three years and he came up and he gave me ahug and he said, so I see you've met my...

...brother and I was like, what is hetalking about? And then I looked at, I was like, wow, but you know, it wasgreat because lee is such a generous, kind guy, right? And everybody isalways trying to get a piece of him and you know, I considered him a friend andquite honestly, if I had known and like if he had been with Andrew, I wouldn'thave gotten picked up in the bar because I wouldn't have wanted tointerfere with them having a drink. So it just, it really was the camel that Ilove that. So on the note of that most adorable in the world meet cutescenario, which I no kidding, I love that. It was a writer's conference. Itwasn't like I know Rando bar. I feel like we should go from this romanticmeet cute into the home wreckers. Is this now a great time to reveal thisnew cover. I want to see this all about it, mary Kay, can you tell us aboutyour fabulous new book? Well it does there. I don't know if itwill, I'm still working on it, by the way, cute in the home wreckers, buthere is, here's the elevator pitch. Hattie Kavanagh is a down on her luckcontractor whose latest house flipped has flopped and she's in a savannahcoffee shop when a reality television producer deliberately eavesdrops on herconversation and he needs us. He sorely needs a hit of his own Somo Lopez.That's his name. Mauricio Lopez. Cast her in a show called the home wreckersfor an HD tv type network and he pairs her with a hunky L. A. Interiordesigner. Their mission is to restore a dilapidated Tybee Island Beach house.Um, and so it's kind of a cross is at the intersection of uh, I don't know,flip or flop and the bachelor kind of sold in. I know. Anyway. Um, so they'reworking on this old Tybee beach house. The workers find the wallet in the wallof a long missing local school teacher. And then that's when Hattie's projecttakes a turn. She never expected and I think Sean is going to give us the longawaited look at the home wreckers cover. I love it. I love it. Okay, so we aregoing to be tall, long, but I know tomorrow writing it way faster. May 3rdMay 3rd. Oh, we're so excited. Okay, we're gonna be talking more about thehome records in the after show. We have a couple of quick announcements andthen Tasha and Andrew. We have one more question for you. So if you don't mindsticking around about another two minutes. If your internet can tolerateus, you got to you into. Um, let me see, let me find all right, Patti you wanted.So yes, I will. But if your internet can tolerate us, great. But if youcan't tolerate us. We get it. It's been a night. So everyone out there, we wantto remind you all to check out our friends and fiction Writer's Blockpodcast. We keep telling you about it and it keeps getting better and betterand better. We will always post links under announcements each time a newpodcast goes out this week, Ron Block and I talked about poetry and novelsand somehow we ended up on young and archetypes and it was all with theauthor of the blockbuster serena Ron rash. And this week Ron Block we'lltalk to seri Feldman about library, rock stars of which Ron block is onefor sure. And if you have not joined our book Club yet, what are you waitingfor? Our friends, lisa Harrison and Brenda Gartner are the most amazinghosts and the group is more than 9000 strong. This would be a really goodweek to join because on sunday october 17th they are going to be celebratingwith patty for the pre pub day brunch at one p.m. Eastern. And you're gonnaget to hear about all things Once upon a wardrobe. We're so excited if youhave not pre ordered your book, you guys right now, the clock is ticking.You got to go do it. It's amazing. It will just break your heart and I do asound effect in my last please. That was it was like it was good, lightlyreclaiming yourself. Yeah, on monday october 25th they're talking to paigeCrutcher about her new novel The orphan...

...which just out and then I'll be backlater in the month to talk about christmas and Peachtree block whichcomes out also on october 26. And it's just amazing how similar those plots uhThat was your also begins with a dead body in the morgue. Great, exactly. Acharacter that you have been grooming for 25 or $30 for your next week. Nextweek we gotta talk about next week Right here, seven p.m. We're gonnawelcome Alice Hoffman and celebrate and her gorgeous new book, we're gonna, itis we're going to celebrate the launch of patties once upon a wardrobe.Remember to preorder it if you have not done so. And because those first weeksales can really make or break a book and we know that. So don't forget I'mgonna borrow from MK A hashtag by my book Dammit three. Order Dammit Zanawith Andrew. Yes. Preordered Dammit. Absolutely. Then in two weeks join usand meet Richard paul Evans as we celebrate Christie's new book christmasand Peachtree Bluff. Yeah. And also don't forget um we always have amazingfriends and fiction merchandise available from our partners at Oxfordexchange. And most recently we have an incredible seasons reading spox thatincludes mary Kay is the santa suit patties once upon a wardrobe and mychristmas, Api street bluff with the option to add kristen's the forestVanishing stars, which I know you've already. So this would just be, ifyou're getting it for a gift for someone else. But this is really theultimate holiday gift. It comes with a free adorable seasons readings, um,ornaments and you can personalize your box anyway. You can add merge to it.You can add other books. You can add the sky is the limit. It's the ultimateholiday gift. So check it out. And you guys, you guys, you guys, we're goingto florida together, pasha and Andrew. Do you want to come? Uh, yeah, I wantto go on a field trip. Okay. We're going on a road trip. So we are goingto florida if you want, you can fit in the convertible with us if you want to.Yeah, I'm a very serious driver. If uh, if you've got to look forward when youdrive kristen like forward, join paris on a win with a stranger. I'm notgetting the car. No, no kidding. So if you want to catch all four of us plusmeg, check out our friends and fiction newsletter. It has all of our booktours were all over the place, but then we're all together in florida will bein ST Pete and Tampa and punta gorda and santa belt. So see us on ourindividual tours and then come see us in florida and just a very quickreminder. You guys all know that last week facebook went down for a littlewhile, which kind of freaked us all out. I know a lot of you watch us onfacebook, just make sure you sign up for our Youtube channel. I subscribe onYoutube, subscribe to our newsletter and then that way, if that kind ofthing ever happens again, you always know we can reach you and you'll knowwhere to find us. So it's just a good backup plan and you know, We send outfun content in our newsletter all 90, almost all 90 plus of our previousepisodes are on YouTube. Um just great additional places to find us. So makesure you do that now. You can do that on our website at the link that Seanput below. There was a lot of announcements, Tasha any uh, sorry, wehad a lot to say tonight. We're not going on a very busy but we're fabulous.Well we have talked about a little bit of your history tonight and we've lovedgetting to know you a little bit better. So can you tell us um, what were thevalues around reading and writing in your childhood, Tasha, Do you want tostart us off? I mean for me reading and I'm notexaggerating this. My first memory is of my mother, I was sitting with my momin our living room on the couch and she was reading little house in the bigwoods by laura ingalls wilder, right? And I realized that I was ahead of heron the page and it gets because I'm thinking about itbecause that was the minute that I learned that you didn't need to grow up,Oh I love that. And that was that was everything, that was everything thatwas just me done and my entire childhood, you know, we would go to thelibrary, I could get as many books as I wanted, it was just heaven. And and asa child, if I was kind of at loose ends...

...and didn't know what to do, my dadwould take me into the room where our bookcases were and we would do what Ias a little girl would say can we look at the books and we would just gothrough, he would walk with me and we look at the books and he'd pull thingsdown and say this is a book about this and you might be interested. So to meuh reading is everything reading gives you the entire world. It can take youto any time, any place and there's been nothing in my life that has been moreimportant and significant to me than reading. That's awesome. What about you?Andrew Yeah, I mean I remember my first memory with books really was was when Iwas when I was very small and I was born in Birmingham England and therewas a small public library not too far from the house and we would go there.It was almost like a pilgrimage once a week. And I mean when I was little, mymother was always infuriated with me because I always wanted to get the samebooks, you know, if there was some that I really liked and I always just wantedto get them over and over, I think I would, you know, I wanted a sure thing,you know? Yeah, small pick was was my very favorite. But yeah, that was,Tasha bought me a first edition of it. It's wonderful. Yeah, so reading wasalways a really big thing and the time that it really got sort of, you know,really took pride of place in my life was one year when I was when I was atschool, this was sort of England in the early 19 seventies and the school Iwent to, the teachers had this idea that you shouldn't mark any workbecause if, you know, they felt that marking work was an elitist thingbecause if somebody hadn't done very well then they might feel bad and that,you know, that should be avoided. So therefore no work was going to getmarked and so I fell into lots of trouble with this, you know, I'mprobably the world's worst person when it comes to to geography. And so 11 day,for example, I remember my mother knew that I had a geography test and sheasked me how I'd done, so I said well I don't know. So she assumed that thiswas just some way of avoiding telling her that I've done incredibly badly. Soshe said well you know there must you know there must have been a number atthe bottom, you know something out of 20 or whatever, they said no, there wasnothing. So she went to the school and she demanded from the head teacher toknow what was going on and they said, you know, we don't we don't might workhere, you know, if you want to mark the work then you know, you can, so shesaid no I'm not doing your work for you. Um so no workout marked and then youknow, I was an ordinary little kid and you know, I probably still am reallyinside and I thought well you know what if the teachers aren't gonna mark thework, I'm not going to do the work. So instead I just took books to school andevery every day I sat and I just, you know, I had a book under my desk and Ijust read and in fact if there's time for this story and you know, it wasreally probably put me on the path that I'm on today because most of the time Ihad you know this is kind of sixth sense that would pick up if the teacherkind of came out from behind his desk and came and tried, you know, to seewhat everybody was doing. So normally I didn't get caught, but once I was Ithink I was 10, I was reading watership down, remember that book? But I lovethat book and I was totally engrossed in it and I didn't hear him coming andhe caught me reading it, he kind of snatches the book and he's first of all,he goes on this big tirade about how it's a baby's book and I shouldn't havebeen reading it and then he looks at me and he says, so I suppose you thinkyou're a good reader, do you? Well you're not you are not a good readerunless you can pick any shelf and read it without thinking. So first of allI'm like read without thinking, what's that all about? But then what? Itsounded like a challenge. Right? Like challenge. Yeah. So I think the minuteI get home tonight I'm going to my dad's bookcase and I'm picking any bookoff it and I'm going to read it, but you know, it's the tecos and it'sgetting a little nervous. I was thinking, well what if he's right, whatif I I'm not a very good reader, what if I can't read one of these books. SoI go home, reach out at random pull down a book and it is ice station zebraby Alistair Maclean, I have no idea what it was, you know, And I'm like,wait, they have Stations on the Ice and there is zebras and then, you know, Ihave no idea what it was. So, I start reading it and it just pulled me in andit really did change my life because first time I'd ever come across anunreliable narrator, you know, the idea, I don't know if you've read this book,but you know, it starts out with this guy who has to black his way onto anamerican nuclear submarine that is in...

...dark in Scotland, as you do as you do.And so immediately I'm I'm I'm hooked and you know, he weaves this incredibletale which, you know, the captain is somewhat somewhat dubious, buteventually is convinced and lets him on. And I'm you know, I'm totally taken inby I believe every word of it. And and at the end of that first chapter, thenarrator says something like, you know, Yeah, I was I was kind of glad that hebelieved it because, you know, I only just made it up on the spot. It waslike, oh, it blew my mind, it wasn't true, he was lying. You know, I had noidea that you could lie in books, You know, I had not, you know, I torethrough the rest of that book, you know, and you know, again, I should havebrought me over there. I'm one of the bookshelves, the 1st 1st edition hardcover of that book because it totally changed me. And from that day onwards Iwas just completely addicted to anything to do with action adventure,spy thrillers. I love spy thrillers, all of those kind of books. I justcouldn't, I couldn't get enough of them and it really all came you know, FatTeacher had actually marked the work that we've done. I probably picked upthat book, You Better geography, you need to know about direction. Oh my God!Oh you two have been such a guest. Oh my gosh! I know so many, you know youneed to come back. Oh my God, I would like you guys don't like Oh completely.So we are all coming to your house regardless of hurricane. Yeah, we'vejust decided the next next friends and fixed in live from your house, we'll bethere. But you too. Thank you so much for joining us tonight. This was such apleasure getting to know you a little bit. We're so excited for your newbooks um and we're just so grateful that you spent a little bit of time andopened up and told us your stories and um which is great. So thank you so muchfor being with us tonight. Well thank you for having us in an absolutepleasure. My question is are you coming herebefore we come to florida or is that after after if you guys hop in the convertible inflorida, I'll just drive us up to Wyoming after we've done in florida,we're going to need a bigger vehicle. We're gonna need us with a rap on it.Well convertible. We could bring our own. Perfect saying, okay, so you guysjust let the publishers know your change of tour plans and we'll see youin florida there. Thank you so much. Have a wonderful night, thank you. Andto all of you out there, stick around for the after show. That was such awonderful show. We're gonna be talking a little bit more about the homewreckers. Um We're gonna be talking about patty's upcoming book, Christie'supcoming book and um remember you're not gonna want this. Yes, exactly.That's right. And we are so excited for a whole new season of books. Be sure tocome back next week, same time. Same place as we welcome Alice Hoffman andcelebrate the lunch of patties. Once upon a wardrobe. So see you in 30seconds in the after show, good night everybody. Good night. Yeah, wow. Yeah, I could have talked to themfor two hours and I wanted to say it but I knew we could have kept talkingand talking and talking, he said he was from Birmingham. He said it with thatbeautiful accent Birmingham England and I live in Birmingham Alabama. I waslike we're sister cities. That's right. You're like so pretty. I like I'm fromsalisbury North Carolina and south korean. England is our sister city. Mysister city. I, there's an app von delay uh expiry implying so there yougo. So well that was so great. But you know, I feel like we get to see thecover of the home records, but I feel like we didn't get to dig into thatwallet story, which I would love to hear how so mary Kay was there aconnection between that wallet and something that happened in your lifelast winter when we were remodeling another beat up old house on TybeeIsland are contractors were tearing out the back wall of the existing bathroombecause we had termites and rot and stuff. And in between the choice theyfound an old wallet which they gave to me when I looked at it. I saw it hadbeen in there obviously since 1950 for the previous on the woman's name.Everything was in there, her driver's license, social security card, militaryID. And I posted it on social media. I knew I, I looked and saw that she hadpassed away the owner and I said, I...

...don't know where her, I saw who hersurvivors were but I couldn't find them. So I posted their names by morning.People said, oh here's where they are and we connected with them. And um, itturns out this woman and her husband had lived there when they were newlywas, he was in the navy and they lived, it was a duplex at that time and theylived in a little downstairs apartment and he was in the Navy and gone and shewas home with a little baby. And um somehow the wall I got in the wall andstill when we, when I talked to her Children, they had no answers for howthe wallet got in the wall. So I started, I know I started and actuallyit was so weird. It's the most response I've ever had to anything that I postedon social media, which is a little scary because I mean, you could beanyone, people just worth so fascinated with it. Um, and I thought, well, and Ialready knew that I was working on a book that was um set on Tybee with awoman fixing up an old house. And I thought, okay, well this is a universetelling me that this story needs to be part of the plot of the book, which Ihad not planned on. So actually it's in there. I mean amazing. It's so weird. Iknow we joked about it a little bit beforehand, but how, um we write aboutthings and they happen right or or we take these little breadcrumbs in ourlife and they show up in a book and sometimes we mean for them too andsometimes they just happen. Sometimes the breadcrumbs lead us into an oldwardrobe. Yes, way that even like even like went like thisfor a second, that was uh that's been up for like 108 hours but he was beingslept in a week. So um but yeah I mean in Once Upon a wardrobe yes thewardrobe, it's the same thing mary Kay that a little bit of the book is aboutis this idea that there's parts of an author's life that shows up in novelslike listening to Tasha and Andrew Talk, you can see those little moments butand the wallet and we want to explain where the story comes from. But in theend in the real end we can't because it's ineffable and its mysterious. Butyes, once upon a wardrobe is a bit about these little breadcrumbs in theauthor's life that show up in the lion the witch and the wardrobe. You knowwhat I was just thinking about that as you were talking is that so much ofFriends and fiction is about explaining the story behind the story. And it isas if you went to C. S. Lewis and invited him on Friends and fiction sothat we can so thank you for making C. S. Lewis a frenzy connection guest inyour book. That's what it is, very opportunity. I mean christians alreadygot that beard, like she could have dressed up as a gosh well launches nextweek she can doesn't really miss the opportunity yet. What are we gonna do,what are we going to do for props? I mean we haven't even discussed that. Iknow, I think that christians should have a pipe and Mp Lewis and then youcan, nobody wants to be the white witch like no, I do. I was thinking of a linefor something. Yeah, somebody could be a lion. Um I'm gonna be the white witch.Okay, I'll get the crown, I will get you a crown by next Wednesday. You knowwhat I love is we've been talking you and I patty have been working togetheron this script for next week, right? Like I'm kind of the things we're gonnabe talking about and because Alice Hoffman is going to be there too, it'sjust gonna be this night about magic. We're going to talk about magic and themagic of story and the magic of books to bring us together and to open upthese new worlds to us and enchantment. Like this idea that you enter theselands, whether it's her book of magic or through a wardrobe or even in astory without magic per se. It is magic. So what I think we have to think aboutthe portal. What's the portal your next week, the world? Why? I think theportal is preordering the the order portal so that when we talk about it onWednesday, you will have already know,...

...walk through it, you know, I'll be inotherwise feel so left out if you don't have it in your I know you feel leftout. Like I said, Jason, this just occurred to me, Jason, my husband justbuilt a wardrobe for our bedroom today. Okay, unprompted. So I feel like nextweek I should do Friends and fiction like live sitting in our wardrobeamongst all my, I think it's a good idea. Do you feel like you have more? Ifind that wardrobe, I don't think so. That's what I'm going to be with you. Iwas going to say the three of us are going to be together, You get together,I'll be in a closet. So it all, I'm going to just have a handful of Turkishdelight and I'm going to just, I'm just going to see what happens. Do that.Okay enough about me. I'm again, it's Christie's, it is Christie's and I am,I'm like the latest reader ever, I'm reading Christie's book right now, itis absolutely phenomenal. I'm not that I know, but I've had it for a littlewhile, right? But there's a scene that I stumbled across the other day. I'mnot going to spoil it right now, but like I, I haven't even finished thebook and like, it made the book for me. Um, and I will, I will reveal that onyour launch episode. Like the scene that I'm like, yes, Kristie, you'veachieved everything there is to achieve in the literary universe with this onescene, can I also just say though to all of you out there, you know, I knowwe say this sometimes, but for those of you who tune in and see, I can saybecause I don't have a new book coming out. But you guys, okay, these ladieshere put so much into this, we're all glued using our minds like there'ssmoke coming out of our ears because the gears are turning too fast. Likethere's just we're doing so much and you know, I know it's a big thing tosay, go out and think about buying our book, but if you're going to thinkabout buying it eventually, it helps us so much if you consider preordering itor buying it in the first couple of days because it means so much for thetrajectory of a book. So, you know, if you're not a person who buys books, ifyou prefer to get them from library, that's fine to put them on your librarywaiting list. Let the library No, you're interested. But if you aresomeone who is eventually going to buy it, think about if you can buy it nowor buy it for a gift or and I'm not trying to give you the hard sell, Ijust know oh, I like it. I like herself both. Yeah, it only works with Kathysays, I know, I know, but you know, I we don't make any money from this show,we put money into this show like Christie tells us all the time. Youhave to write another check. I'm finance director and yeah guys, we allhave to put in this what they're what posit us in the bankof love. That's what you all do forever and that is worth, do not find a dimeon us, it is still worth it. But like this is a labor of love for us. So Iguess I'm just saying I don't want you to think that we're getting rich onthis show way you know, I have to go because if you're still hanging aroundyour computer, I am about to be on facebook live with the Rachel Mcmillanand she is in Canada and she's giving away a Canadian version. But we aregoing to go over and do a pre pub chat on Rachel Mcmillan's facebook page andI love you madly and that was very nice to see you on Tuesday. I can see alland I get to see you Kathy on monday and you want Tuesday and then youkristen the following week meg will be riding Shotty, that's always right andjust a few more days it's gonna be great. I between now and then I promiseI do it all right before, I love you guys, bye. Thanks. Thank you for tuning in. You can joinus every week on Facebook or YouTube where our live show airs on Wednesdaynights at seven p.m. eastern time. Also subscribe to our podcast and follow uson instagram. We're so glad you're here, Yeah.

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