Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Friends & Fiction with Tasha Alexander & Andrew Grant

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

F&F is pleased to welcome husband and wife thriller writers Tasha Alexander and Andrew Grant. They discuss their life on a wildlife preserve in Wyoming, Tasha's bestselling Lady Emily mystery series, their own "meet cute" at a hotel bar at a literary festival, and, of course, Andrew's role in co-writing and taking the mantle of the beloved and mega-bestselling Jack Reacher series from his brother, Lee Child. Hear about Tasha's latest book THE DARK HEART OF FLORENCE and Andrew's latest Jack Reacher novel, BETTER OFF DEAD.

Welcome to Friends and fiction for new york times, Bestselling authors, endless stories, novelists, mary Kay andrews. Kristen Harmel, Christie Woodson harvey and paddy Callaghan Henry, R four longtime friends with more than 70 published books between them together. They host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent bookstores. They discussed the books, they have written the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hello? Hello. So it is Wednesday night and that means it's time for my favorite our of the week. Welcome to friends and fiction. We have so much to look forward to tonight. I'm Christine Harmel, I'm Christine Whitson Harvey, I'm patty Callahan Henry, I'm mary Kay Andrews and this is Friends and fiction for new york times, bestselling authors, endless stories to support indie bookstores. Tonight we'll meet Tasha alexander and Andrew Grant to acclaimed new york times bestselling novelists who also happened to be married to each other. This is the second husband and wife team we've hosted after john Truby and Leslie lair last month and I'm so excited to dive in with them. We'll talk about each of their new books as well as what it's like to be married to another successful writer, how they influence each other's work. What it's like to live in a log cabin in Wyoming and what's up next for each of them. Yeah. And we have partnered with war X in beautiful California as our featured independent bookstore for the month of october works as the country's oldest continuously family owned and operated bookstore. So we see them as an ideal partner for our mission here on fN f friends and fiction. By the way, we're encouraging you to shop local and shop small by buying from works over the course of the next few episodes of Friends and fiction. And we will also ask you to look at the special opportunities along the way and browse their selection, which also includes our books as well as the latest by tonight's guest Tasha alexander and Andrew Grant. And we have a kind of cool announcement to make tonight. I'm going to say it's more than kind of cool. I'm gonna say it's super cool. You already know that you can watch us live each week on Facebook and YouTube and that if you want to see any of our previous episodes, 90 of them were coming up on our 100 they're all cataloged on our YouTube channel. Well, starting this friday, you can also catch us on a brand spanking shiny, fancy new platform. And when we say brand new, we mean like right now it is called local plus it specializes in locally produced content and it launches this friday right now. Today at this moment while you're listening, you can sign up to watch online and in the next few weeks there will be an app available on IOS and android android and Andrew Andrew, that's our best android two. It's a great place not only to find our best of episodes and new episodes each week, but also to find other cool content such as brand new good news show from our september guest, former CNN anchor Daryn Kagan. It will eventually cost a few dollars a month to access the service. But if you sign up this week, the 1st 60 days starting when it launches this friday with us, you are absolutely free to try it out. Sean is going to put up the link below and we really encourage you to sign up right now. It helps support local businesses and is founded by some really smart women and we're so happy to be a part of their launch and we hope you'll join us to see what else you can discover on their streaming service. So sign up at go Loco plus and we will see you there. Yeah, we're so excited about that. Thanks for telling us about it, Patty Speaking of cool new things you'll definitely want to be involved in. Tonight is a night where you will want to stay until the very end of the show because we will be showing you at the bottom of the hour the cover reveal of the home records...

...mary Kay's brand new novel, which will be out on May 3rd 2022. You guys are not gonna want to miss this. The cover is amazing and we cannot wait to hear mary Kay tell us about the book. It's gonna be so fun. It is. Yeah. And you know every week we partner with Parade magazine online this week, Kristen reflected on something that just blows my mind. I know this is so something that I never, in a million years would have had the courage to do. But he talks about her decision to move to paris on a whim in her early twenties, the most impulsive thing she's ever done. Which is good because moving to 100 country with a stranger on a win is it's pretty important you're gonna find a link to our and our instagram bio but meanwhile Kristen, can you tell us about it? Yeah, just very briefly and actually I was thinking what a perfect discussion topic this is tonight because I think Tasha has also you know Tasha and Andrew who are our guests tonight I think have done some really extraordinary things such as leaping into this home in Wyoming which I think was a big life change for them. So we'll talk a little bit about that. But yeah, when I was in my early twenties you can read the essay. I don't have to recap it for you. But basically I moved to paris on a complete whim I didn't speak french. I had no idea what I was leaping into but I think Sean, I think you have the picture of what the view from my window actually was. I mean I didn't know if I was walking into like a murder house that you know, I was never going to come back from. But it turned out to be this that was my view. And it changed my life and changed my, my career. And I think sometimes I forget about the value of being impulsive, sometimes not always having to know the next step. Um and as I put it, the essay leaping before you look every once in a while. So I'm wondering from the three of you, has there ever been a time that you've done something a little bit impulsive, a little bit out of character that turned out to be exactly the leap you needed? Well, some of my impulsive things I don't want to talk about, but but there was a time when, when my youngest son graduated from college and it was the first time I was going to be alone in the house. I mean with my husband, but in 20 something years and so I applied thinking there's no way I'll get it for this trip. It was a hiking trip to Ireland and you had to write an essay and you had to be accepted and hundreds of people applied and I thought there's no way I'm going to get it, but I'm just gonna do it and I was accepted and when I got it I thought I'm not going, I can't go by myself to Ireland and then I did and it was one of the best things I have ever done. It's life changing. It is it is. How about you mary, Kay? You know, I had, I'm struggling to think about when, when was the last time I've done something just totally impulsive. I'm not normally a reckless person. So I haven't, I don't know if I've done anything reckless. I was thinking about, what have I done anything like that? Maybe. Um, when I adopted my pseudonym and I was working on Savannah Blues, we were getting ready to remodel our house in, in Atlanta and I announced to my husband and family because we weren't going to have a kitchen. I said, okay, I'll, I'm moving to Savannah for the summer to work on the book. That would become Savannah Blues. And so I said he's out, y'all, I rented a friend, it's my apartment and the first time I'd ever lived alone in my life, wow, I'd always shared a bedroom with my sister and I went to college and then my room. Next roommate was my starter husband. I've never lived alone. So I guess that's, I guess that's as impulsive as I get, I might have to loosen up, keep hanging out with us. Yeah, exactly. That's right there. I think I'm kind of, I don't know if impulsive is the right word, maybe just like decisive and I will make these big decisions kind of, that I think to other people, it doesn't look like I thought them through, but I'm just like, no, I know, I know that's that's the thing now. Nothing huge like moving to paris or anything, but so there's like a lot of things that I could say or think about. But honestly all I think the show, I mean we all made a very impulsive decision jump into this thing that like took over in a way, our lives. Yeah. And we all just like every day we keep saying yes, you know, and I think that's really the thing that I think about, especially like during this past, you know, a couple of years where there hasn't been a lot of opportunity to be like, let's you know, hope on the cruise. You know, you can't really so impulsive in a pandemic. So I think...

...that's a good one. I really do. And it just goes to show like what Kristin wrote about that sometimes there's big leaps end up being the best things that ever happened to us. Ah that's so true, You're right. This has been so wonderful and you're right. It was a leap at the beginning and it continues to be a leap, right? Plus we're like, yeah, can we do it? Exactly. Tasha and Andrew, let's go for it. Exactly. Exactly. Exactly. So to all of you out there, we would love to hear your stories to if you have an example of a time you have left without looking and really felt like it was the right choice. Put it in the comments or you know, tell us about it. Um under announcements on our facebook page we always love to hear from you. It means so much to us. So now without further ado let's talk about our incredible guests Tasha alexander and Andrew Grant. Tasha is the daughter of two philosophy professors. She is the author of the long running Lady Emily series as well as the novel Elizabeth The Golden Age, which is the novelization of the 2000 and seven Universal Pig pictures film starring Cate Blanchett's. Did I say that? Right Blanchett's, Tasha studied english literature. Yeah, that's how you say right. Tasha studied english literature and medieval history at the University of Notre Dam and now she lives in South I think it's actually Notre Dame. And now she lives in Southeastern Wyoming with her husband who happens to be today's other guest novelist. Andrew Grant. Andrew Grant hails from Birmingham England and after studying english literature and drama at the Drama at the University of Ship. It's hard to say drama. Sometimes you want to say drama but don't don't do that dom instead of Notre dame. Well, but they're both are correct. They're just defense true true prom. Er he founded and ran he also University of Sheffield, he founded and ran a small independent theater company which, among other things appeared at the world famous Edinburgh Fringe festival. He then worked in telecommunications for 15 years, he finally before finally making the transition to becoming a novelist. In addition to being married to Tasha alexander. He is the younger brother of novelist James Grant, whom the world knows as lee child In january 2020 child announced that he intended to retire from his enormously popular Jack Reacher book series and then Andrew would take over. So he is now writing that series under the pen name Andrew Child. How cool! Right, How exciting is that? Harry Hey, you can have some stuff to talk about about pseudonyms. That's awesome. So we have so much to talk about tonight with both of these fascinating guests sean can you bring Tasha and Andrew on Hi guys, I just want I just want to stop everything. And mary kate tells everything about home records. I know we're talking about your books, that's the point of this evening, your books we want to hear and your life. Exactly. So Tasha and Andrew were so excited to have You were so happy you're here. Tasha, could you begin by telling us about the dark heart of Florence, which I believe is the 15th novel in Your Lady Emily series, which will be out in paperback this coming Tuesday. Amazing. Yeah, I can't I can't believe it's already coming out in paperback this book. It's it's funny because when I went to Florence research the book in november of 2019, I actually got really sick while I was there and I'm pretty sure I was like patient zero in Tuscany with Covid. Oh my gosh, all right, more skinny. Um it wasn't you was going to be someone. So when I write it all goes back to this woman, I was sitting on a plane about seven days beforehand, but that's that's another long boards for it. Uh this book, I I got really interested while I was doing the research on this. I wasn't sure what I wanted to do with it. And I think anybody who writes a long running series gets this. You want to bring something fresh the characters. And when I was doing, when I was kind of delving into the research, I usually start by looking at a place and then looking at historically what was happening there at the time. Uh and I had decided I settled on Florence, but what really captivated me. My protagonist Emily, her husband Colin, who's indescribably handsome and a dashing covert agent of the Crown. He's basically single handedly keeping the...

...british um fire going. Uh The book that Emily is part of the book is set in 1903 and at that time in Britain were getting into things that are leading to the First World War and what I learned was that the british public fueled catalyzed by the tabloid press, does this sound familiar? Um yeah, was was really being spoon fed this idea that Germany was horrible evil and like they were trying to invade Britain, which of course was really not the case yet, but there was a whole uh movement in in writing where people writing these books that were about german spies in Britain around the turn of the century. And funnily enough, and not surprisingly, once you get post World War One, we learned that there were literally no spies, german spies in Britain before the war, but it just really kind of shows you how people believe this. They believed it was not true again, does this sound familiar? Um so I was really taken with this idea of a group of sensibly intelligent connected, engaged people Going down this rabbit hole of believing that their country was full of German spies. And so that was gonna set me off on the path for this book. Um and then there is a second storyline because we always have Emily and this is 1903, but um if you're going to write about Florence, you really do want to write about the renaissance. And so the secondary timeline in the book follows the story of a young woman who is living during in Florence during the renaissance um going through the time when Savonarola really this just mad and insane monk um stirs up the population to start destroying the art and the literature and the beautiful things that that made the renaissance, the renaissance. So, see I'm not really good at explaining a book, I kind of have to write the book. No, you explain to her. Yeah, and I'm the same way I feel like I but I thought that was great, That was fantastic. And I'm excited to talk to you in a minute, just about the idea for that whole series because I think it's so such an interesting idea and so different from what other people are doing. I love it. But before we get to that Andrew, can you tell us a little bit about better off Dead, the 26th installment of the Jack Reacher series, which I believe will be out october 26. Absolutely, yeah, that's that's the launch date and we're, you know, we're very excited about it because we just had such a fun time writing it, you know, the last to my brother and I wrote together and we, you know, when when he made the decision to to sort of bring me on board, it's a kind of gradual retirement for him, um he had a couple of things that he wanted to try to do a couple of sort of slight course corrections we wanted to make. So with the first book last year's book, the sentinel, we had those in mind, you know, we we had a couple of things that we wanted to achieve, which is very unusual for him because he's famous for never outlining never planning just coming up with a good opening sentence really not even an opening scene and then just taking it from there and seeing where it goes. So the sentinel, we had a couple of things we wanted to do and we felt like we we achieve those things. So this time around we didn't have that, you know, hanging over us, we could just come up with a fun beginning and run from there. And so what I did was I kind of secretly wrote this introduction, this this first chapter and and sent it to him to see what he, what he thought about it. And I came up with this idea of a scene that was right on the border between Arizona and Mexico where a huge huge guy was waiting for a kind of clandestine meeting. And uh it's supposed to be with one person. But actually four people showed up and these four people came, had the misguided idea that they could, they could get the better of the enormous stranger and turned out not so well for them. Um but then another person arrived out of the shadows shot the stranger in the chest. And the next scene is the morgue in the, in the little town where this giant figure is on the slab and they examine his, his possessions and he doesn't have very many. All he has is that he's got an ATM card. He's got an expired passport, he's got a few dollars and he's got a folding toothbrush and when they opened the passport to the, to the information page it gives the name Jack non reacher.

So you know, it starts out with Jack on the slab and if you want to know how we got there and what happens next, I'm afraid you're gonna have to buy the book caesar. Okay. That's the ultimate tease. Right? Yeah. That's the ultimate yeah. The ultimate hashtag by my book. Dammit. Okay. Andrew uh you know, it's fascinating and rare to take over a series from a living author the way you've done here and I can't imagine picking up the mantle from a sibling. Especially considering that I read a quote from you saying that when you started out writing, I spent all my time trying not to sound like lee child. I love that idea. I can only imagine I have a younger sister who is a playwright and I can't imagine her ever ever wanted to do anything that I wanted that I've done. But I love the idea that sometimes we don't know where the road will lead and I wish you would tell us about how your brother approached you to take first of all, do you call him lead, you call him by his real name? How does that work? Yeah, I mean I've got, it varies honestly, you know, I normally try to avoid his name altogether and just save my brother are just calling, I that's okay but no one needs to really worry about anymore you know. I know but you know I think I actually met lee the very first time I was doing a book that before my first book came out and so he was always lied to me and then once we got together I needed to call him jim and that was really hard for very good. Yeah but I mean what happened honestly was We uh in the graphic that flashed up earlier you had the last book that I wrote on my own the the second in my for McGrath series which is called too close to home. And that book came out there it is that book came out in January 19. So um because we live you know after we moved to Wyoming um you know my brother thought we were crazy, couldn't understand what we were thinking moving from Chicago to here. So he came out to have a look and after he'd been here about half an hour he said hey are there any other houses for sale around here? Oh my gosh he actually bought the one that he's now next door but one neighbor. So in Wyoming that means he lives 3.5 miles away. So so I went too close to home came out because we're in Southern Wyoming um they wanted to do the launch event at a bookstore in Denver in colorado called the tattered cover So I I called him up and said you know if you want to come to this event with me and he said yeah sure. And so we figured it made more sense just to go in one car and he wanted to go in his car so that he could smoke. So he drove us down there and you know what it's like when you're getting really do an event or you're really thinking about is the event you're thinking. I hope I don't say anything ridiculous. I hope I don't forget my own name, I hope I don't trip over my feet on the way to the stage. Yeah, exactly. I was totally focused on the event, fortunately it went pretty well. But then on the way back he said to me all right, well I drove down, you drive back and it's only later when I see how carefully he planned this whole thing because it's january and we're in Northern Colorado crossing into Southern Wyoming so the weather is horrendous. We've got this ground blizzard going on where there's this snow and ice exploring horizontal in front of the car. We cannot see a thing. I said to him when we, when we left I said you know it's 50 50 whether we wind up at home or whether we wind up in a ditch a wise person would have just got a hotel but others do not get a hotel. Now we will soldier on, we set up to dr hopes that we were driving home, there was no debate. So I'm driving along and I'm having to focus really hard, I'm not crashing the car and just sort of very casually my brother says to me, you know, I'm thinking of retiring and so if I was a nice person, I would have said to him, yes, absolutely, you should retire, you've worked so hard for all of these years, you've brought all of this pleasure to all of the readers who love your books. You know, you should just take some time, enjoy the fruits of your labor and have a lovely retirement, but I'm not a nice person. So instead I said to him, you mean retire, what's going to happen to reach her because you know the things I'm the oldest reacher fan in the world, I was the The...

...first person to have ever read a reacher book, you know, because you know the boot 25 years ago was on the other foot. I had a really good job in the telecoms industry and he was out of work and broke and you know, he decided that the way he was going to fix this problem of having no money was to write books because we all know that's a good idea, right? Yeah, that's tracked a massive, well you do with all those yachts, so many, many, many money, you writes the first breach of book killing floor and it's on yellow paper written in pencil. And he sends it to me to read because he knows that I'm really the only thriller reader in the family. And I remember looking at the opening the envelope, looking at the first page because I'm terrified for two reasons because I'm thinking what if the book is terrible, I'm going to have to call my big brother and say, listen, I'm sorry, but your book sucks. Who wants to do that? I didn't want to do that. But then it could be a practical consideration too because if it had, he had no job. So what was gonna happen with, I'm gonna have to send him food parcels, you know, was I going to have to let him bedroom, you know, what was gonna happen? So luckily the book, I didn't have to say those things and you know, the rest was history, but I've been a reach a fan for more than a quarter of a century. Um, you know, and reach a had almost become like a kind of extra imaginary brother. You know, when we hung out together, we would always say, what would reach you do about this? What would reach you do about that? What would he, you know, something would come on the news or we'd see something happening at a baseball game or a soccer game and we said, well, what would reach you do about that. So it's this entity that's kind of existed between us for all of these years and I just couldn't stand the idea that there wouldn't be any more reach your books and I certainly couldn't stand the idea that it would be my fault, that there were no more reach your books. So really that was that was what hit the balance with me. The other thing was, I can't quite remember how he phrased it, but it was almost like a kind of challenge involved in what he said. You know, maybe maybe you'd like to join me or maybe you'd like to start writing something like that and whatever it was, it struck me as a bit of a challenge and I'm terrible if anything is like a challenge. I've got myself into so much trouble over the years, you guys were talking about the things that you did, that we're impulsive or whatever for me, the things that have been that have caused me the most grief have always been. The things that are standard, like a challenge that I couldn't walk away from. Yeah. When I was left on my dad would, if there was something he thought I couldn't, there was a bit of a challenge. He would always say, oh no, Andrew never be able to do that. And that meant, you know, I would do it twice and take photographs and it was only when I was older that I realized, well alone what what he was doing. So yes, it was bad. It was all in the in his car driving but driving back from that book event and it was a while ago now. And so we've got 200 belt. Well 1 1 is that in the world better after cut and we're already working on the on the next one because he had this thing where he, you know he looked like I said he was on the he was he was out of work when he started writing. He got fired from his job on august 31st. So he started writing killing floor on september the first. So he has this long running almost superstition, you know this tradition that he has to start the next book on september 1st. So september 1st this year we started interesting. That's cool. Andrew what is it like taking over and established series like this. And I keep thinking about the reaction to fans after, you know in the movies, they cast Tom Cruise as a teacher in the movie. I mean my husband is a major major uh reach your fan and he's like how how that mean they cast a hood ornament as reacher. How did a tournament male version of holly pocket doll. Ben Tom Cruise. Okay, so first of all Tom Cruise is one of the first actors that we all know to be short right? And I think that maybe has something to do with the jumping up and down on Oprah's couch. Yeah baby home. Yes, but but most, most leading men are really short. In fact jim lee went to when they were filming the first movie, he went to...

...paramount and was on the set and you know at the studio and the costume mistress, like the head of costumes of paramount pictures, brought him in to her department and gave him a jacket and he and she said put this on. So you know, jim is really tall, not quite as tall as Andrew, but he's really tall. Uh so he's on and and the jacket comes up to like about here on him. Uh huh. Oh no. Oh no, that that's what happened with the jacket. Okay, I'm going to guess so what what the lady said was that jacket are that size because that's what most leading men are. Oh no, we lost them. Oh my gosh, I hope they come back. How interesting was that story though, about how he took over the series? I think that's amazing. Could you imagine doing that with the sibling? Like if if Jeannie came to me and said you know let's write it to be like what? That would be crazy and Sean is pointing out in the comments we should address. So they're having a little bit of internet trouble. Um the they have satellite internet and uh and they've had a snowstorm I think they said today. So um their internet is a little bit off right now. So hopefully they'll be able to reconnect. That's why they're a little bit fuzzy. We're kind of trying to make the best of it. So just letting you guys all know um do the cover of you. We could do that. You want to do that. Let's, you know, we like go completely off script. Yes. Let's row tonight is about being impulsive. Yeah. Before we look happy. This is your first lesson. This is your first lesson in doing it mary. Kay, can you that you could be more impulsive and yep, were to grant your wish. You just push you to the edge of your comfort zone all of the days, right? Christine is manifesting intentions over there right and left soon. We will have something amazing to tell you about and our intentions that she has somehow manifested, right people what they want. Okay, Okay, so now for the moment we've been waiting for the way this is me doing sound effect way. I know, I know, but I'm being impulsive way. Not when you're jet lagged. I know you're so jet lagged by the way, I don't So before we do this moment we've been waiting for. I think this is what happens because let me just like I'm like checking on my phone and like the internet is working. This is what happens when you try to reveal that Clint Eastwood is also short uh ba b star because so jim pulls on this jacket, it comes to his elbow or whatever. And she says that is the jacket one of the jackets that clint Eastwood War in the Dirty Harry movies. And she said yours the thing with leading men, We are all within about 4" of each other. So, this idea that Tom Cruise Dwarf. Well, also, and I mean, li said this from the beginning, working with him, Tom read all of the books. Tom took this very, very seriously calm, worked so hard. He showed up prepared. You know, I mean, we all have our issues with Tom Cruise, I guess. Like why do I have so many issues with Tom Cruise? Like, I'm not really entirely because you know, it's easy to have issues with him. I was I was on tour at the time that the announcement came and I couldn't talk about anything at my events for my book. Except how short Tom Cruise was like, this is what we got going on. This is what we're doing that. I like a nice guy drew, how is it? Andrew um you know, taking over kind of iconic. I mean, were you at all intimidated by the expectations or did you just say bring it on? Well, you know, your original question was spot on because the first thing that came into my mind was the reaction with the song Cruise stuff for the movies. You know, I just thought, you know, the richer fans are so loyal and so passionate. You know, they have these these kind of pretty violent reactions and I thought, you know, I don't want to be on the wrong side of...

...that. But I also thought, I mean, you know what, it's like writing a book, you've always got those voices in the back of your head, You know, you're imagining your editors saying, oh my God, this is the stupidest thing I've ever read. You know, you're imagining what the reviews you're going to get an amazon, you're imagining, you know, all of that stuff. And the only thing you can you can do is that out, right? That's all you can do. All you can do your it. So I tried to take this approach where I gave myself a certain period of time where I would acknowledge the fact that yet I was taking a risk and there could be an adverse reaction. And then I thought, okay, time you know, time out on that that goes in a box and it goes on the shelf and I'm not going to think about it anymore. All I'm gonna do is do the best job that I can and just hope that it's it's good enough because you know, when there's pressure like that, what can you do about it, it's out of your control. You've just got to ignore it and and try and do your job. And that's what I did and I mean, yeah, that there were, you know, I think probably the nicest thing that that came out of it was that, you know, we, we, we've known for a little while about what we were planning to do before it became public. And the publishers wanted to control the narrative and wanted to, kind of, handle the way that the news was was released. But before they could do that, somebody, a journalist somewhere found out somehow and he leaked the story and it wound up in the, in the press, first of all, in London and then it came over to the States. And so it was out there, there's nothing anybody could do to manage it or curate it or spin it. You know, it was just the news, this is what's happening. And what I really loved about that was that the majority of the responses were just so kind to my brother. You know, they were, we love his books that he's, we've loved reading them for all these years. We wish he would keep going. But hey, you know, everybody needs to retire eventually and they were wishing him the best. And I just loved that. It was, it was genuine. I think people could tell that the story was, was just the story, it hadn't been, you know, adopted or or tarted up in any way by any pr people. It was just, it was just the unvarnished truth. And so once they, you know, they had that lovely response as far as my brother was concerned. And then, you know, there were a few kind of voices saying, well what's gonna happen is it is it going to be any good? Is it gonna be is Andrew going to ruin it? And then luckily the majority of voices that came back were saying, well we don't know, but give the guy a chance, you know, wait until, wait until he's written one and see what you think. And so, you know, I'm really grateful for the way that that happened. Because of course people were gonna be worried. It's natural as a change. People are worried, is it still going to be the same? Is it going to be as good? And when I met the I had to meet the publishers in London and they were asking me what was my what was my goal? And what I said, well, you know, because lee right from the very beginning, he always said it wasn't about him, it was about Reacher. He always wanted people to go to the bookstore, he wanted them to go and say, have you got the new Reacher? You know, not the specific title necessarily not him preacher. So I said, well my goal would be um somebody, you know knew the next Reacher comes out, Somebody is rushing to the bookstore to buy it on their way home from work, but they get delayed, you know, there's there's traffic problems whatever. By the time they reach the bookstore there's only one copy left and that copy has been damaged somehow. The cover has been torn off the spine is missing. The only thing that's left of the pages that contain the story. So they buy it anyway because they can't wait to read it and they go home and they stay up all night reading the book and they get to the end and they say well 27 28 29 books in and it's just as good as ever. You know what I want is for them to even notice the difference. It's just you know our father was irish so he could get away with these things and he had this expression the same, only different you know and that's what I want. Yeah I want to I want people to read it and think well yeah just the same as ever. Just as good as ever. I don't want anybody to think well you know this has changed or that's changed or you know I don't want them, I don't want to put my stamp on it. I don't want to put my my you know my mark on it. I just wanted to be what my brother created and I I keep going for for as long as people wants us to keep going. But I think creature one of those really rare characters it has become so iconic and I think I can share this story that lee told us about a woman who works in his agent's office who was in his agent is in Britain. So this woman is in line for coffee behind a quite elderly woman who is holding the new lee child book and she says to the...

...woman, you know, I actually, I work in his agent's office and the woman turns around and says what Jack's office and she said, oh no, no, no lee child, the author and she's like, well, but the authors, Jack Oh wow. Yeah, Well, you know, so the books are about Jack reacher, but but lee child rights them. And so the woman said she kind of paused for a minute and then she said, oh, you mean, you mean, Jack sits down with this lee child fellow and tells him the story and he writes it tom Yeah, so I I guess the the idea is uh Andrew a seamless transition. Mhm. And I mean this iconic character, that's what, that's what your readers want. Yeah, you you nailed it with their words seamless, you know, that's exactly what we're trying to do and that is the difference really in what we're doing, is that, you know, there's plenty of examples of people who have continued long running series after the authors have died and some of them have done a fantastic job, but there's always been a break and it's the person who picks up the reins has always been chosen by you know, the estate or you know, somebody else, not the author of themselves because they're so what was different is that you know, this was actually leaves choice. This is what he wanted. And you know, he he has this expression you know, he says that you know, in every author there's that little 10% or whatever the percentage is a little there's a little bit of crazy in there. You know, you have to have that little bit of craziness. And the thing is that you can learn the craft, you can learn the techniques, all of that stuff. But that extra little margin of crazy that has to come from within you and we have the same DNA we we have the same crazy and that that is the difference. You know, and so you know, to emphasize that, you know, that's why we are doing the first few books together so that people will be reassured that it's not just to sort of falling off the edge of the cliff and then you know, popping up somewhere else. You know, it's it's more like a relay race where one person hands that onto another and there's that period of time where both of them have their hands on it. And also why, you know, I just, you know, I agree to write with with a pseudonym because we wanted to really stress that family connection, the fact that we are brothers. And it's not some random connection. It's not just some commercial arrangement. It's one brother passing on to another to continue in exactly the same vein as they were doing before. When when you're als internet went out for a second. I was saying I can't imagine doing it with my sister. But when you describe it that way, it's more um it does probably makes it more Seamus because you know each other so well and you're both writing and you're both in there together. So it's fascinating. But Tasha, I want to talk to you for a second more than a second. Speaking of writing a successful series, you have written the very popular, we talked about it a second ago. Lady Emily mysteries a series. When did your first one come out? When was the first Lady Emily 2005. Okay, okay. So you were writing them when we met a series that currently stands at 15 books. It's a meticulously researched series of historical suspense set in Victorian London and then later in other places around the world. But during that same time period and Tasha, it's really like unlike anything else out there, can you talk to us about what makes this time period so perfect as both the setting for mysteries and a sort of proving ground for ahead of her time protagonist. And while you're talking about that also the challenges because that's really far in the past. Like there's, You know what, 1908, 19, early 1900s, most of the time. Yeah. At the first book was set in 1890, and I picked that year because that late victorian era is is to me endlessly fascinating. You've got All of this social change happening, you know, you've got people coming up with radical ideas that, like, five year olds shouldn't be working for 20 hours a day, things like that, and, you know, outrageous women thinking they should have the right to vote. Uh, so it's this crazy, we're in Crazy Women. Okay.

But, you know, I have a story for you about this actually, I'm going to get off track, but I'm going to briefly, I'm going to try to be brief. I'll try to not write a novel about it. Um, I had one book set in there earlier, I think it was 18 94 5 maybe, that dealt with a lot of the suffrage issues. And at that time, in real life, in Britain, there was this group of women called the Women's Liberal Federation, and they were considered the most radical women, basically on the planet. Okay. And they had a schism in that year, because half of these incredibly radical women, I thought that it was going too far to suggest that women should actually vote. I mean, you know, let's not get crazy here, right? We wish the boundaries. Yes. And so, so, you know, victorian era is full of so many amazing historical figures who seem to spring from the womb as iconoclast fighting for women's rights, fighting for Children's rights, uh, fighting for social change. But the thing that always fascinated me about it is that you can have all those people, but until you get a ground swell, swell of support from the non iconic class, like the people who are already comfortable, who are doing fine until those people start to turn around and say, hey, wait a minute, you know what the way things are isn't okay. Like we need to take a look at these things until you get that groundswell. You can't get wholesale social change. And so I wanted, when I was starting writing this series, I wanted to think about what would it take and what would catalyze a young woman who is comfortable who has everything she wants, what makes her go from being comfortable in her coddled upper class life to saying a lot of these things aren't okay that we take for granted. And so that was kind of why I picked the time period. And also, you know that late victorian era, you've got the british empire. The sun never sets right. The sun never set on the british empire at that time. There was never a moment on planet earth where the sun wasn't shining on some part of the empire and we today can look back at this and say, not only that we know the empire isn't in fact going to last forever, but also that is going to come up against the hard stop of World War One. We know this, they didn't they truly believe that this was going to go on and on and on. And so I find something really poignant about that time that, you know the way we can look at it nostalgically and say, well, we actually know what's coming. There was some interesting legal aspects to that period to incentive woman. Well, absolutely. Because you go from during that late victorian era where women can't own property separately from their husbands, you get married, everything goes to your husband. But then there comes a point with the women's property act where women, I mean, the craziness that women can own things separately from their husbands. So this is a really interesting, it's a really interesting time period. Well, and what's interesting is you didn't make her marginalized so that she had to buck the system. You made her comfortable but still have enough, You know, guts to do and then keep doing it through 15 books. No, it's great, because you know, I think it's really interesting to write about and think about the marginalized people. But I was really taken with this notion that you need those people, you need those people who are comfortable, yep, to start getting things going if you want actual change to happen. That's so interesting. That's a really good point. And now it just shows that everything is continuously relevant, right? I mean, everything that we're living the same things over and over again. Um so far. Yeah. Sorry? No, I was just gonna say that, I think that's one of the things about historical fiction that I have always loved is that you know, if you start getting, if you're writing fiction and you start getting didactic and people feel like you're judging them, that's not really a good way to reach people and make them think about. But when you have the lens of history, everything is at arm's...

...length. And so we're not saying that everyone now is doing this, but hey, this is what they were all doing the last gilded age and of course we can all draw the conclusion, but it doesn't feel as accusatory. So I think there's a way that you can kind of, people are more open to hearing it when they think it's not about them. They don't get as defensive. Yes. Yeah. Well, of course we know the two of you are married, but we would love to know your story. So can you tell us a little bit how you met and what it's like to be married to another successful author? Well, you know the way this happened really was that I was at what we were both at a writer's cough at a book conference and I picked him up in the bar and anyone who's ever been to write knows that everything that is happening in the evening is happening in the bar and yeah, in the bar, I picked him up in the bar. There's a little bit more to it than she lets on. B I mean, you know, the stories, you know, it is actually true, but a little bit of background was it was the year before my first book came out. And so I've been, I've been told, okay, you've got to start going to these industry events, go to this conference that meat, you know, readers and reviewers and booksellers and everybody who's involved starts to try to get your name known a little bit. So I go to this, you know, work out of this conference actually with my brother and we had had dinner, we had a massive speak dinner and we came out how in the conference later and we came out and he wanted to go outside for a cigarette and you know, apart from him, I knew no one, I knew nobody really. All I wanted to do was just go outside with him when he had a cigarette. But I thought, no, that's stupid. I've come here to work. I've got to start meeting people. I better get on with it. And he actually lee calls this camel, that changed the world. Yeah, I love it. So I I tell him that I'll see him later. And I go and I figured I walked to the, to the entrance to the bar and in this particular hotel, the fire was enormous and it had a, you know, the actual bar down one side where you get your drinks, round tables all along the middle and then booths at the other side and it was crammed full of people. I thought, oh God, I don't know anybody. What am I going to do? Because you know, in England, you just go up to people and say, hi, let me tell you about me. You know, it's supposed to be properly. So, I think what, wait back up, where was the conference Baltimore Baltimore 2008, 8, 2000 and eight. Yeah, So, so I think what I'll do is I'll go to the far end of the bar, right, I'll push my way through the crowd to the very far end, then I'll turn around and start making my way back and then even if I lose my nerve, I'll at least have to say excuse me or I'm sorry or something, you have to at least two people, this is my, this is my plan. So I take one step into the room and then I see Tasha standing at one of these round tables in the middle with a group of friends and I see her standing there and I think, right, the plan has changed, but the problem is what am I gonna do? I can't just go up to this gorgeous girl, you know? So I think well what I'll do, I'm in a bar and I haven't got a drink so I'll go and order a drink and while I'm waiting for it to come I'll think of something. So, you know, most bars in my life I've been to you know, you wait it seems like you wait half an hour for your drink to come. Right? So I think there'll be plenty of time. But now this particular bar, you know, I ordered a drink and a moment later it's there in my hand and I'm like, oh no, I haven't thought of anything yet. This isn't this is Sarah remember I look around and she's walking over towards me. And so yeah, we were yeah anonymous. Is that I saw that he was on his own and didn't know anyone and that he was rescuing him, right? Because that's what we single girls in bars do. We just uh for men who look a little lonely and we tried to make them feel better, Right? I mean please that's what I see why the message. But but it was because we just started talking and that was it. I mean like we haven't stopped talking since then. And I guess we've been chatting for about an hour and his brother came in and you know, I had known him for for three years, his brother more than three years and he came up and he gave me a hug and he said, so I see you've met my...

...brother and I was like, what is he talking about? And then I looked at, I was like, wow, but you know, it was great because lee is such a generous, kind guy, right? And everybody is always trying to get a piece of him and you know, I considered him a friend and quite honestly, if I had known and like if he had been with Andrew, I wouldn't have gotten picked up in the bar because I wouldn't have wanted to interfere with them having a drink. So it just, it really was the camel that I love that. So on the note of that most adorable in the world meet cute scenario, which I no kidding, I love that. It was a writer's conference. It wasn't like I know Rando bar. I feel like we should go from this romantic meet cute into the home wreckers. Is this now a great time to reveal this new cover. I want to see this all about it, mary Kay, can you tell us about your fabulous new book? Well it does there. I don't know if it will, I'm still working on it, by the way, cute in the home wreckers, but here is, here's the elevator pitch. Hattie Kavanagh is a down on her luck contractor whose latest house flipped has flopped and she's in a savannah coffee shop when a reality television producer deliberately eavesdrops on her conversation and he needs us. He sorely needs a hit of his own Somo Lopez. That's his name. Mauricio Lopez. Cast her in a show called the home wreckers for an HD tv type network and he pairs her with a hunky L. A. Interior designer. Their mission is to restore a dilapidated Tybee Island Beach house. Um, and so it's kind of a cross is at the intersection of uh, I don't know, flip or flop and the bachelor kind of sold in. I know. Anyway. Um, so they're working on this old Tybee beach house. The workers find the wallet in the wall of a long missing local school teacher. And then that's when Hattie's project takes a turn. She never expected and I think Sean is going to give us the long awaited look at the home wreckers cover. I love it. I love it. Okay, so we are going to be tall, long, but I know tomorrow writing it way faster. May 3rd May 3rd. Oh, we're so excited. Okay, we're gonna be talking more about the home records in the after show. We have a couple of quick announcements and then Tasha and Andrew. We have one more question for you. So if you don't mind sticking around about another two minutes. If your internet can tolerate us, you got to you into. Um, let me see, let me find all right, Patti you wanted. So yes, I will. But if your internet can tolerate us, great. But if you can't tolerate us. We get it. It's been a night. So everyone out there, we want to remind you all to check out our friends and fiction Writer's Block podcast. We keep telling you about it and it keeps getting better and better and better. We will always post links under announcements each time a new podcast goes out this week, Ron Block and I talked about poetry and novels and somehow we ended up on young and archetypes and it was all with the author of the blockbuster serena Ron rash. And this week Ron Block we'll talk to seri Feldman about library, rock stars of which Ron block is one for sure. And if you have not joined our book Club yet, what are you waiting for? Our friends, lisa Harrison and Brenda Gartner are the most amazing hosts and the group is more than 9000 strong. This would be a really good week to join because on sunday october 17th they are going to be celebrating with patty for the pre pub day brunch at one p.m. Eastern. And you're gonna get to hear about all things Once upon a wardrobe. We're so excited if you have not pre ordered your book, you guys right now, the clock is ticking. You got to go do it. It's amazing. It will just break your heart and I do a sound effect in my last please. That was it was like it was good, lightly reclaiming yourself. Yeah, on monday october 25th they're talking to paige Crutcher about her new novel The orphan...

...which just out and then I'll be back later in the month to talk about christmas and Peachtree block which comes out also on october 26. And it's just amazing how similar those plots uh That was your also begins with a dead body in the morgue. Great, exactly. A character that you have been grooming for 25 or $30 for your next week. Next week we gotta talk about next week Right here, seven p.m. We're gonna welcome Alice Hoffman and celebrate and her gorgeous new book, we're gonna, it is we're going to celebrate the launch of patties once upon a wardrobe. Remember to preorder it if you have not done so. And because those first week sales can really make or break a book and we know that. So don't forget I'm gonna borrow from MK A hashtag by my book Dammit three. Order Dammit Zana with Andrew. Yes. Preordered Dammit. Absolutely. Then in two weeks join us and meet Richard paul Evans as we celebrate Christie's new book christmas and Peachtree Bluff. Yeah. And also don't forget um we always have amazing friends and fiction merchandise available from our partners at Oxford exchange. And most recently we have an incredible seasons reading spox that includes mary Kay is the santa suit patties once upon a wardrobe and my christmas, Api street bluff with the option to add kristen's the forest Vanishing stars, which I know you've already. So this would just be, if you're getting it for a gift for someone else. But this is really the ultimate holiday gift. It comes with a free adorable seasons readings, um, ornaments and you can personalize your box anyway. You can add merge to it. You can add other books. You can add the sky is the limit. It's the ultimate holiday gift. So check it out. And you guys, you guys, you guys, we're going to florida together, pasha and Andrew. Do you want to come? Uh, yeah, I want to go on a field trip. Okay. We're going on a road trip. So we are going to florida if you want, you can fit in the convertible with us if you want to. Yeah, I'm a very serious driver. If uh, if you've got to look forward when you drive kristen like forward, join paris on a win with a stranger. I'm not getting the car. No, no kidding. So if you want to catch all four of us plus meg, check out our friends and fiction newsletter. It has all of our book tours were all over the place, but then we're all together in florida will be in ST Pete and Tampa and punta gorda and santa belt. So see us on our individual tours and then come see us in florida and just a very quick reminder. You guys all know that last week facebook went down for a little while, which kind of freaked us all out. I know a lot of you watch us on facebook, just make sure you sign up for our Youtube channel. I subscribe on Youtube, subscribe to our newsletter and then that way, if that kind of thing ever happens again, you always know we can reach you and you'll know where to find us. So it's just a good backup plan and you know, We send out fun content in our newsletter all 90, almost all 90 plus of our previous episodes are on YouTube. Um just great additional places to find us. So make sure you do that now. You can do that on our website at the link that Sean put below. There was a lot of announcements, Tasha any uh, sorry, we had a lot to say tonight. We're not going on a very busy but we're fabulous. Well we have talked about a little bit of your history tonight and we've loved getting to know you a little bit better. So can you tell us um, what were the values around reading and writing in your childhood, Tasha, Do you want to start us off? I mean for me reading and I'm not exaggerating this. My first memory is of my mother, I was sitting with my mom in our living room on the couch and she was reading little house in the big woods by laura ingalls wilder, right? And I realized that I was ahead of her on the page and it gets because I'm thinking about it because that was the minute that I learned that you didn't need to grow up, Oh I love that. And that was that was everything, that was everything that was just me done and my entire childhood, you know, we would go to the library, I could get as many books as I wanted, it was just heaven. And and as a child, if I was kind of at loose ends...

...and didn't know what to do, my dad would take me into the room where our bookcases were and we would do what I as a little girl would say can we look at the books and we would just go through, he would walk with me and we look at the books and he'd pull things down and say this is a book about this and you might be interested. So to me uh reading is everything reading gives you the entire world. It can take you to any time, any place and there's been nothing in my life that has been more important and significant to me than reading. That's awesome. What about you? Andrew Yeah, I mean I remember my first memory with books really was was when I was when I was very small and I was born in Birmingham England and there was a small public library not too far from the house and we would go there. It was almost like a pilgrimage once a week. And I mean when I was little, my mother was always infuriated with me because I always wanted to get the same books, you know, if there was some that I really liked and I always just wanted to get them over and over, I think I would, you know, I wanted a sure thing, you know? Yeah, small pick was was my very favorite. But yeah, that was, Tasha bought me a first edition of it. It's wonderful. Yeah, so reading was always a really big thing and the time that it really got sort of, you know, really took pride of place in my life was one year when I was when I was at school, this was sort of England in the early 19 seventies and the school I went to, the teachers had this idea that you shouldn't mark any work because if, you know, they felt that marking work was an elitist thing because if somebody hadn't done very well then they might feel bad and that, you know, that should be avoided. So therefore no work was going to get marked and so I fell into lots of trouble with this, you know, I'm probably the world's worst person when it comes to to geography. And so 11 day, for example, I remember my mother knew that I had a geography test and she asked me how I'd done, so I said well I don't know. So she assumed that this was just some way of avoiding telling her that I've done incredibly badly. So she said well you know there must you know there must have been a number at the bottom, you know something out of 20 or whatever, they said no, there was nothing. So she went to the school and she demanded from the head teacher to know what was going on and they said, you know, we don't we don't might work here, you know, if you want to mark the work then you know, you can, so she said no I'm not doing your work for you. Um so no workout marked and then you know, I was an ordinary little kid and you know, I probably still am really inside and I thought well you know what if the teachers aren't gonna mark the work, I'm not going to do the work. So instead I just took books to school and every every day I sat and I just, you know, I had a book under my desk and I just read and in fact if there's time for this story and you know, it was really probably put me on the path that I'm on today because most of the time I had you know this is kind of sixth sense that would pick up if the teacher kind of came out from behind his desk and came and tried, you know, to see what everybody was doing. So normally I didn't get caught, but once I was I think I was 10, I was reading watership down, remember that book? But I love that book and I was totally engrossed in it and I didn't hear him coming and he caught me reading it, he kind of snatches the book and he's first of all, he goes on this big tirade about how it's a baby's book and I shouldn't have been reading it and then he looks at me and he says, so I suppose you think you're a good reader, do you? Well you're not you are not a good reader unless you can pick any shelf and read it without thinking. So first of all I'm like read without thinking, what's that all about? But then what? It sounded like a challenge. Right? Like challenge. Yeah. So I think the minute I get home tonight I'm going to my dad's bookcase and I'm picking any book off it and I'm going to read it, but you know, it's the tecos and it's getting a little nervous. I was thinking, well what if he's right, what if I I'm not a very good reader, what if I can't read one of these books. So I go home, reach out at random pull down a book and it is ice station zebra by Alistair Maclean, I have no idea what it was, you know, And I'm like, wait, they have Stations on the Ice and there is zebras and then, you know, I have no idea what it was. So, I start reading it and it just pulled me in and it really did change my life because first time I'd ever come across an unreliable narrator, you know, the idea, I don't know if you've read this book, but you know, it starts out with this guy who has to black his way onto an american nuclear submarine that is in...

...dark in Scotland, as you do as you do. And so immediately I'm I'm I'm hooked and you know, he weaves this incredible tale which, you know, the captain is somewhat somewhat dubious, but eventually is convinced and lets him on. And I'm you know, I'm totally taken in by I believe every word of it. And and at the end of that first chapter, the narrator says something like, you know, Yeah, I was I was kind of glad that he believed it because, you know, I only just made it up on the spot. It was like, oh, it blew my mind, it wasn't true, he was lying. You know, I had no idea that you could lie in books, You know, I had not, you know, I tore through the rest of that book, you know, and you know, again, I should have brought me over there. I'm one of the bookshelves, the 1st 1st edition hard cover of that book because it totally changed me. And from that day onwards I was just completely addicted to anything to do with action adventure, spy thrillers. I love spy thrillers, all of those kind of books. I just couldn't, I couldn't get enough of them and it really all came you know, Fat Teacher had actually marked the work that we've done. I probably picked up that book, You Better geography, you need to know about direction. Oh my God! Oh you two have been such a guest. Oh my gosh! I know so many, you know you need to come back. Oh my God, I would like you guys don't like Oh completely. So we are all coming to your house regardless of hurricane. Yeah, we've just decided the next next friends and fixed in live from your house, we'll be there. But you too. Thank you so much for joining us tonight. This was such a pleasure getting to know you a little bit. We're so excited for your new books um and we're just so grateful that you spent a little bit of time and opened up and told us your stories and um which is great. So thank you so much for being with us tonight. Well thank you for having us in an absolute pleasure. My question is are you coming here before we come to florida or is that after after if you guys hop in the convertible in florida, I'll just drive us up to Wyoming after we've done in florida, we're going to need a bigger vehicle. We're gonna need us with a rap on it. Well convertible. We could bring our own. Perfect saying, okay, so you guys just let the publishers know your change of tour plans and we'll see you in florida there. Thank you so much. Have a wonderful night, thank you. And to all of you out there, stick around for the after show. That was such a wonderful show. We're gonna be talking a little bit more about the home wreckers. Um We're gonna be talking about patty's upcoming book, Christie's upcoming book and um remember you're not gonna want this. Yes, exactly. That's right. And we are so excited for a whole new season of books. Be sure to come back next week, same time. Same place as we welcome Alice Hoffman and celebrate the lunch of patties. Once upon a wardrobe. So see you in 30 seconds in the after show, good night everybody. Good night. Yeah, wow. Yeah, I could have talked to them for two hours and I wanted to say it but I knew we could have kept talking and talking and talking, he said he was from Birmingham. He said it with that beautiful accent Birmingham England and I live in Birmingham Alabama. I was like we're sister cities. That's right. You're like so pretty. I like I'm from salisbury North Carolina and south korean. England is our sister city. My sister city. I, there's an app von delay uh expiry implying so there you go. So well that was so great. But you know, I feel like we get to see the cover of the home records, but I feel like we didn't get to dig into that wallet story, which I would love to hear how so mary Kay was there a connection between that wallet and something that happened in your life last winter when we were remodeling another beat up old house on Tybee Island are contractors were tearing out the back wall of the existing bathroom because we had termites and rot and stuff. And in between the choice they found an old wallet which they gave to me when I looked at it. I saw it had been in there obviously since 1950 for the previous on the woman's name. Everything was in there, her driver's license, social security card, military ID. And I posted it on social media. I knew I, I looked and saw that she had passed away the owner and I said, I...

...don't know where her, I saw who her survivors were but I couldn't find them. So I posted their names by morning. People said, oh here's where they are and we connected with them. And um, it turns out this woman and her husband had lived there when they were newly was, he was in the navy and they lived, it was a duplex at that time and they lived in a little downstairs apartment and he was in the Navy and gone and she was home with a little baby. And um somehow the wall I got in the wall and still when we, when I talked to her Children, they had no answers for how the wallet got in the wall. So I started, I know I started and actually it was so weird. It's the most response I've ever had to anything that I posted on social media, which is a little scary because I mean, you could be anyone, people just worth so fascinated with it. Um, and I thought, well, and I already knew that I was working on a book that was um set on Tybee with a woman fixing up an old house. And I thought, okay, well this is a universe telling me that this story needs to be part of the plot of the book, which I had not planned on. So actually it's in there. I mean amazing. It's so weird. I know we joked about it a little bit beforehand, but how, um we write about things and they happen right or or we take these little breadcrumbs in our life and they show up in a book and sometimes we mean for them too and sometimes they just happen. Sometimes the breadcrumbs lead us into an old wardrobe. Yes, way that even like even like went like this for a second, that was uh that's been up for like 108 hours but he was being slept in a week. So um but yeah I mean in Once Upon a wardrobe yes the wardrobe, it's the same thing mary Kay that a little bit of the book is about is this idea that there's parts of an author's life that shows up in novels like listening to Tasha and Andrew Talk, you can see those little moments but and the wallet and we want to explain where the story comes from. But in the end in the real end we can't because it's ineffable and its mysterious. But yes, once upon a wardrobe is a bit about these little breadcrumbs in the author's life that show up in the lion the witch and the wardrobe. You know what I was just thinking about that as you were talking is that so much of Friends and fiction is about explaining the story behind the story. And it is as if you went to C. S. Lewis and invited him on Friends and fiction so that we can so thank you for making C. S. Lewis a frenzy connection guest in your book. That's what it is, very opportunity. I mean christians already got that beard, like she could have dressed up as a gosh well launches next week she can doesn't really miss the opportunity yet. What are we gonna do, what are we going to do for props? I mean we haven't even discussed that. I know, I think that christians should have a pipe and Mp Lewis and then you can, nobody wants to be the white witch like no, I do. I was thinking of a line for something. Yeah, somebody could be a lion. Um I'm gonna be the white witch. Okay, I'll get the crown, I will get you a crown by next Wednesday. You know what I love is we've been talking you and I patty have been working together on this script for next week, right? Like I'm kind of the things we're gonna be talking about and because Alice Hoffman is going to be there too, it's just gonna be this night about magic. We're going to talk about magic and the magic of story and the magic of books to bring us together and to open up these new worlds to us and enchantment. Like this idea that you enter these lands, whether it's her book of magic or through a wardrobe or even in a story without magic per se. It is magic. So what I think we have to think about the portal. What's the portal your next week, the world? Why? I think the portal is preordering the the order portal so that when we talk about it on Wednesday, you will have already know,...

...walk through it, you know, I'll be in otherwise feel so left out if you don't have it in your I know you feel left out. Like I said, Jason, this just occurred to me, Jason, my husband just built a wardrobe for our bedroom today. Okay, unprompted. So I feel like next week I should do Friends and fiction like live sitting in our wardrobe amongst all my, I think it's a good idea. Do you feel like you have more? I find that wardrobe, I don't think so. That's what I'm going to be with you. I was going to say the three of us are going to be together, You get together, I'll be in a closet. So it all, I'm going to just have a handful of Turkish delight and I'm going to just, I'm just going to see what happens. Do that. Okay enough about me. I'm again, it's Christie's, it is Christie's and I am, I'm like the latest reader ever, I'm reading Christie's book right now, it is absolutely phenomenal. I'm not that I know, but I've had it for a little while, right? But there's a scene that I stumbled across the other day. I'm not going to spoil it right now, but like I, I haven't even finished the book and like, it made the book for me. Um, and I will, I will reveal that on your launch episode. Like the scene that I'm like, yes, Kristie, you've achieved everything there is to achieve in the literary universe with this one scene, can I also just say though to all of you out there, you know, I know we say this sometimes, but for those of you who tune in and see, I can say because I don't have a new book coming out. But you guys, okay, these ladies here put so much into this, we're all glued using our minds like there's smoke coming out of our ears because the gears are turning too fast. Like there's just we're doing so much and you know, I know it's a big thing to say, go out and think about buying our book, but if you're going to think about buying it eventually, it helps us so much if you consider preordering it or buying it in the first couple of days because it means so much for the trajectory of a book. So, you know, if you're not a person who buys books, if you prefer to get them from library, that's fine to put them on your library waiting list. Let the library No, you're interested. But if you are someone who is eventually going to buy it, think about if you can buy it now or buy it for a gift or and I'm not trying to give you the hard sell, I just know oh, I like it. I like herself both. Yeah, it only works with Kathy says, I know, I know, but you know, I we don't make any money from this show, we put money into this show like Christie tells us all the time. You have to write another check. I'm finance director and yeah guys, we all have to put in this what they're what posit us in the bank of love. That's what you all do forever and that is worth, do not find a dime on us, it is still worth it. But like this is a labor of love for us. So I guess I'm just saying I don't want you to think that we're getting rich on this show way you know, I have to go because if you're still hanging around your computer, I am about to be on facebook live with the Rachel Mcmillan and she is in Canada and she's giving away a Canadian version. But we are going to go over and do a pre pub chat on Rachel Mcmillan's facebook page and I love you madly and that was very nice to see you on Tuesday. I can see all and I get to see you Kathy on monday and you want Tuesday and then you kristen the following week meg will be riding Shotty, that's always right and just a few more days it's gonna be great. I between now and then I promise I do it all right before, I love you guys, bye. Thanks. Thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on Facebook or YouTube where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven p.m. eastern time. Also subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here, Yeah.

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