Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Friends and Fiction with The Fab Five w/ pop-in by Cassandra Conroy

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The friends & Fiction authors gather to discuss the concept of legacy and what they as writers hope to leave behind with their body of work. They are joined briefly by novelist Cassandra King Conroy to discuss her recent memoir Tell Me a Story: My Life with Pat Conroy and how The Pat Conroy Lierary Center honors his legacy. Plus a special suprise gift presentation for Cassandra from her agent and her son! https://cassandrakingconroy.com/

Welcome to Friends and fiction. Five best selling authors Endless Stories, Friends and Fiction is a podcast with five bestselling novelist whose common love of reading, writing an independent bookstores found them together with jets, author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. Thes friends discuss the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Bestselling novelist Mary Kay Andrews, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey Patty Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice Munro are five longtime friends with more than 80 published books. To their credit at the Start of the Pandemic, they got together for a virtual happy hour to talk about their books, their favorite bookstores writing, reading and publishing in this new uncharted territory. They're still talking, and they've added fascinating discussions with other bestselling novelists, so join them live on their friends and fiction Facebook Group page every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Eastern, or listen and view later at your leisure. Hi Hi, everybody. Welcome to Friends and fiction. Take Two Things is our weekly Facebook live show, featuring author chats and support of independent bookstores. We're so thrilled, honored and humbled to be here with almost 22,000 of you on this six months after, just after six months after our first show. I'm Christi Woodson Harvey. My latest focus feels like falling, and I will be your host tonight. I'm Patty Callahan, Henry, and my latest novel is becoming Mrs Lewis and hi, I'm Mary Alice Munro, and my latest novel is on Ocean Boulevard. I'm Mary Kay Andrews and my latest, his Hello Summer. I'm Christine Harmel and my latest is the Book of Lost Names, and this is friends and fiction. Welcome. We are so grateful for all of our amazing guests. But I have to say that I really have a soft spot for these just US weeks when we really get to delve into more personal questions a little bit more about, you know each of us and feel like we really get to know you guys out there in our friends and fiction universe. And, of course, is always we're teaming up with a favorite bookstore this week. This week is one of my personal favorites, South Main Book Company in Salisbury, North Carolina, which is where I'm originally from, Um, and it has been a fixture in downtown Salisbury for my whole life and much longer than that and under several different name iterations, but has been a real fixture of our downtown for decades. Elissa Redmond and her daughter, Margaret, moved to Salisbury right before the pandemic to purchase the bookstore. And through all the turmoil she has done the most amazing job of creating and continuing a sense of community there. I was there a couple of weeks ago, signing stock with Alyssa and my mom, and we all decided that visited South Main feels like you're visiting with family. So tonight she's offering a discount on many of our titles online and 10% off in store when you mentioned friends and fiction. So we'll drop the link in the Facebook page. But thank you to to Elissa for all she does for our community. And thanks to all of you at friends and fiction who support these incredible storage that are truly the heartbeat of our town, the stores like South but main book company are such integral, vital parts of the fabric of this country and in print, something so lasting onto each of us. Which brings me to our topic for this week. I did an interview recently with Alicia magazine and the publisher, who is, incidentally, one of the best interviewers I have ever encountered asked me what I wanted my legacy to be. No one had ever asked me that before, and it sort of stopped...

...me in my tracks. I'm kind of ashamed to say that it isn't something that I really thought that much about, which is especially odd because my next book under the Southern sky is all about legacy. So I know we normally begin with an easy chat. But since we're welcoming our special guest, Cassandra Conroy, in just a few minutes Cassandra King Conroy. In just a few minutes, I thought we should dive right in. So, ladies, I'm going to turn it over to you. What does legacy mean to you? And what lasting impression do you want to leave on the world? I feel like that's a big question. Um, how do you do You want to start? Sure. Um, when I saw you were gonna ask that I was like, Oh, have I ever thought about that? What does that even mean? What is the legacy? There's not gonna be a Patty Callahan literary center like What does it mean? You don't know? Uh, so I want to run an essay because I was asked why I write, and I don't think it's that I've ever thought about many legacy. I actually think more about what I want my next story to be about than I do what I want. Full body of work to say. Um, but I can see this. I know. I want my legacy to be that I want write stories that leave others to, um, or open life, um, or open heart or, um, or honest life. When I think about that, I think about stories I want to tell because they're worth telling for those reasons. I don't usually think about the whole legacy, but what the reason? I want to tell that story. Um, I think we see ourselves in a story, and we look for ourselves in a story, and I want people to find their braver, better self in My story will move towards that. That's nice. That's that's a beautiful answer. Mary. Alice, What about you? I think it's a little different for me because 20 years ago, you know, I know it, I want the legacy to be and I feel like after 20 years I've done it. And that was when I did an environmental and effort to make a difference with the environment. And it's been a serious 20 years, 20 some books and I don't know if they'll be read in another 20 years from now. But at least I feel that in my lifetime I really made an effort in a decision to say I think books can make a difference in life. We can all make a real difference. Each one of our books makes a difference in personal lives, and for me it would be for the environment. So for me, that's it. You know, it's something I'm aware of, but I feel like I'm ready to. I've done it, you know? It's like I'm sort of ready now to play a little bit with the next books. E You deserve that, Christian, what about you? Such a hard question and I've been thinking about it since you mentioned that we were going to talk about this on day. I'm still not sure. I have a great answer. Um, you know, because I I don't think about that when I sit down to write I you know, I don't know that any of us necessarily do each time, you know, as we're writing, but I don't know, I guess when I look at the work I've done recently, it Z it's been about the Holocaust, and it's been about World War Two. So I hope you know that maybe what people take away from what I'm doing now is just that memory of we can't forget, You know, we can't forget and we have to learn from our past. Um, and I'm certainly not alone in reminding people of that. And I love that There are reminders all around us of that that you know that there are many people writing about World War Two. There are Holocaust survivors still speaking out. I mean, those stories are still out there, but, you know, I think that's a piece of it. Just that reminder. But also, you know, I've been saying this lately. A lot in chats. Um,...

...some of the virtual chats I'm doing, I think the thread that runs through a lot of my stories is that we all have it within us to be extraordinary. Um, as ordinary as we may feel we are. We all have the capacity to be extraordinary. I feel like I've said that 1000 times in virtual chats. But maybe that's something I'd like people to take away from my books. And remember that you don't need anything special to make a difference in the world. You just need to be you. I think that's important, Christian. What you just said about the Holocaust is to remind people Yes, it happened. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. E mean, As the years go by, I feel like its slipping further from my memory. So yeah, it is important. Yeah. Mary Kay. What about you? You know, I would love for my legacy to me that I told stories that were full of heart and full of humor on gun. I think about the bookshelf behind me Has a lot of my novels almost 30 now, and I don't think that them is. You know, I last night I was thinking, Oh, my God. I have almost 30 books in the Library of Congress s so cool e Don't think about them is I s p n numbers. Yeah, number that's, you know, on the spine, people think about the characters. I would like my legacy to be the characters that my book of life and so well, I do library events. People tell me, Oh, my gosh, I wish you would do another Callahan Garrity Mr Did eight of those or people would say, you know, I want another easier baby or, um, people talk to me about the Diane, um of Josephine and the High Tide Club. So I would love it if my legacy were that I gave people stories that made them laugh, made them connect with each other, maybe made them think about you know what? People tell me this. I always get your book when I go to the beach every summer and I look forward and I know yeah, I know summer is going to start when I when I see one of your books and so that that's all the legacy I need. I mean, I have I have Children and grandchildren there, my riel, flesh and blood legacy. But I love it. If if people would say Yeah, I love those stories. I love those characters. Yeah, just not such a good point. But I'm sorry, Christians. No, no, no, no, no. Go ahead. Go ahead. I was just gonna say, I think I've taken for granted. I think something that the pandemic has shared me really is that I've taken people's happiness for granted. Like just this simple act of giving someone a few hours of joy like that was just something that I didn't really consider that important. And I think now, you know, after seeing what people have been through and seeing what books have meant to people, especially now, just the mere simple fact of making someone smile for a few hours is e. I love that idea of being part of people's memories. I mean, if every year you go on your beach vacation and before you go, you pick up the latest Mary Kay Andrews like that's a part of everybody. Like that's a part of summer. They'll remember for the rest of their lives. I think that's always begins with M K. And that's right, E. Well, that is amazing. And speaking of legacy A. So we've mentioned we have a special topping guest tonight, Cassandra King Conroy, who is going to tell us a little bit about her new memoir? Tell me a story of my life with Pat Conroy. E can't figure out how to get out of the dark i e o e The story of my life right there closer to the screen so we can see your pretty face. Oh! Oh, God, no, them have thio. Uh, Well, in...

...addition to her new book, we're hoping that Sandra will tell us a little bit about how she is carrying Pat Conroy's legacy forward with the Pat Conroy Literary center. Eso Cassandra, Welcome. We're so excited to have you. And I know I speak for all of us when I say just how moving and charming and funny, um, in all the right places, this book really is. Well, thank you. Thank you so much. Um, yeah. I didn't have any sort of agenda, you know, as such. When? When I when I wrote the memoir a sad fact. I didn't even in 10 to write a memoir at the time. I was actually working on Cem. Cem recipes some stories when patent, I cooked together for for a cookbook that I was doing. And, uh, in telling those stories, I realized that that's what I wanted to do. I want to tell our story of of our time together, and and so that's you know, that's pretty much how have the memoir came about, but one e think something's even if we don't intend them. If we don't set out and say, Oh, I'm going to do sewing so with this book or I'm going to make everyone you know feel such and such a way or anything like that I was hearing some of your conversation earlier, and I don't I don't no this but I don't think any of us really set out with those kinds of things in mind. I certainly don't but and in some ways I guess I was. I waas sort of keeping Pats legacy alive through this book on, I think we do this. We keep all legacies alive by telling stories. You know, that, Z, I never would have considered its one time. I would have had a of a fight, I guess, with my wonderful editor who I've not had a single crossword with. But if she had wanted to change the title off my story, I would have fought for because that's that's what I wanted to be. Tell me a story. Uh, because storytelling and especially these days, is so very important, it is the way that we carry on legacies. Uh, there's nothing my kids loved better than to get their grand parents to tell them, you know, about growing up when they came along and and things like this. And now my grandkids, you know, do this a z Well, so I think that's, you know, telling telling our stories on telling other people's stories. So, Christian, you were you were talking about. I don't You know, we have our own personal stories. Uh, but I think the more that we hear some of these stories, whatever the voice comes from, maybe, you know, we, uh you can't say Well, this was a personal experience from me, but I experienced it through reading about it like like, you know, the Holocaust or some some of these things that happened. And, uh and I want to share. You know what it said to me, how it spoke to may, Uh, and this thinness handed down and handed today and you did it so beautifully. I mean, you were so honest and moving and funny, but I...

...felt I always need to people. I felt like I was just sitting on the couch with you, Sandra, and we're just heard stories and I didn't care before. It was really personally I was hoping for. That was now that waas what I was, you know, kind of hoping for a smoke conversational. Um, for one thing, Pad has been written about S o many times, and there's so many different ways. There is an official sort of biography coming out in a few years about him. There's been other other books written, written about to him and studies and, you know, this sort of thing. But no one really had the story that I that I had helped eso I wanted it to be personal and and just Aziz, though we were just sitting down and someone said, Well, how did you meet? Pattern? You know what happened when you were seeing each other? And how did you end up getting together after becoming friends for two years? You know, before we ever even thought of each other's anything other than friends and so forth. So So I just I wanted, uh I want Thio have that approach. Yeah, it's wonderful. I think you you really did all of that and more. Um, Mary Kay, I think you had a question for Cassandra. Uh, sand, You know, we're talking about legacy tonight, and you've done You've done an incredible job creating such a lasting one for Pat Conroy. Can you tell us briefly about the work that you're doing with the Pat Conroy Literacy Center? Because I built There are folks who don't know about it. Who would love to know about it? Okay, I'm gonna scoot backwards and see if I can get more in the light here. Just going. So Okay, five here. Don't worry. You're okay. You're good. Oh, now you're low. That's better, isn't it? Yeah, that's good. Well, I won't reach for it now. I'm out of the lamp. The 12 after, uh, after pat Pat died. Um, you know, there was a lot of conversation about how, how to what was a fitting memorial for him and the city of Buford discussed, um, putting up a statue of him in the waterfront park, which is a beautiful place downtown. Those of you that have been to be for no. And every time I go the waterfront park, you know, I just think, Oh, this would be so great. Except for one thing I had I had to tell them No, no, they couldn't do that. Should have, Uh uh. But I didn't tell them the reason because, uh, one time Pat and I were traveling and we were in some small town in in New England And honestly, do not remember who the writer waas but were wandering around in their town square. They had a It's more statue of a well known writer. I'll just say it's Nathaniel hartal. Whoever. No. Yeah. Pets said don't ever let them do that. E o. And I said, oh, okay. Said it would just give the critics the pigeons a chance to do what the credit has been doing. E you know, it was it was e. I really thought that he was he was such a man of action. Hey, could never here of, uh, you know, unjust cause or anything like that...

Without he, he was a warrior's heart without wanting to, you know, go after he would write letters to the editor he had here about a book being banned or, you know, school board banned a book, and here he would dio hey, would go charging after on. He started that. I mean, this very first book he wrote, hey, went after the school board, cost him his his job, and he never he never talked again. Um, then he went after his school. He went after the brutality of family violence. Um, and, uh, thes all these different issues men, mental illness in the family that isn't that swept under the rug and not talked about. And an embarrassing for some families and so forth, not for path, you know, if he could if he could do something. And he did that through his writing and through through telling stories. So when, uh, it was suggested that maybe we should have a ah literary center as a way of carrying on this is an action base sort of way of carrying on, uh, Pats pets legacy? Uh, some of us got together then to organized. We claim a nonprofit, and, uh, this was it's four years ago. Now it will be not quite four years, but but I'm gonna send a since we started a literary center downtown, Buford, And we've had this amazing outreach. Um, our director travels all around, you know, uh, get presenting programs about pets, legacy books and so forth. But we Pat will never wanted to be just about him. Hey, who want? He was known for helping other writers. He was a mentor for so many other ones. He may have been for some some of you. I know he waas. Yes, I know on just so many others. So I mean, we we have these writing workshops and retreats and we have a at Camp Conroy for kids. We, uh, look at all sorts of issues. You know, that important folks today. Social justice and racial, you know, issues in the community and healing just so many so many things like that that were, but and we're a new organization were we're beginning to do all these things that that we've set our hearts and minds. I'm doing carry on this legacy that really is That is just incredible. And patty, I think you have a question for Cassandra, actually that Will you tell us where you are, Patty? Really quickly. Before you asked Cassandra your question, I was going to say What is so fascinating? So you know how much we love Indies? And I got in a jam on time tonight. So the main thing Jessica Osborne, who owns and runs the shaver booksellers e and I am broadcasting from E shavers tonight. And Cassandra, this is the last store Pat ever signed at. Ah, yes, it is. I feel like I'm gonna cry. Like how serendipity is that? Yeah. Jessica just leaned over to me and said, This is the last story he ever sent E No. So, Cassandra, I have a big question for you. Are you ready for a huge surprise? Yes, E think,...

...uh, there's someone at the door. Who is it? Oh, okay. Okay. Let me entreat. Sneaking around on you, Cassandra. Uh oh. Everyone. Marley. Marley grew saw who is not only Cassandra's literary agent and was Pat Conroy's literary agent. But it's also my literary agent, and she is the co founder of the Pat Conroy Literary Center. Because you see Cassandra behind your back. We including the fact five here and Mary Alice jumped on board and we have been plotting and raising money for the center e. I know that there was a day when you and Pat fell in love and Pat promised you I'm not gonna cry a room of your own. I'm already getting there, so and then gave you a room of your own at your house on the title River and view for and now we, the Fab Five and a few others want to do the same for you. So, Marley, take it away, Cassandra and all of you and all of you at home or wherever you are listening to this, Sandra, you know that Pat believed that every voice mattered and that it's actually become pretty much of our mission statement. He also believed, as I know you dio, that reading and writing and shared stories actually can help heal a broken world. Hey shined his light on so many dark corners and in many cases his readers would tell us that he saved their lives. That's really true. So But we're so proud to be able to announce that a new education office at the Pat Conroy Literary center will carry your name. It will be the Cassandra King Conroy Education Office of the Pack Congress Center. Thistle Groom will help us create more innovative programs around storytelling and to impact the lives of future generations of Children and the elderly. It's going to be, um, something that we can all look back on with great pride. So I want to also announce that today is the beginning off our capital campaign. We have to raise a lot of money to buy this building in January. If you want to see a picture of the building, you go on our website www dot pat conroy literary center dot com, where you're encouraged to donate. But this is the beginning. Today is the day that we will begin the campaign, and it's a day that we're going to honor you, Cassandra, for everything that you've done for so many others and that you continue to do every day. Um, that also said that words are pretty. Yeah, he said that we should pay attention to those who perform. And so I want to thank especially the five women of friends and fiction. But being the first to step up to the plate when we said we needed help. I also want Thio. Thank Hattie Callahan, Henry and Mary Alice for helping me extend the reach to other women novelists. So this room will have a plaque with the names off friends and novelists, other women who also have cherished a room of their own, as you were given by Pat and we are now giving to you. I'm going to read the list of the women who have contributed. I've got to get my clinics. I'm sorry. A next break. Take a clean next break. Okay. Are you ready, Cassandra? Okay. Among the group of the...

...group of writers whose names will appear on a plaque on the Cassandra King Connery Room. Mary Kay Andrews. This is alphabetical guys. So Mary Kay Andrews, Sandra Brown, Barbara and Travis Haggerty, Christian Harmel, Hattie Callahan Henry Christie Woodson Harvey Bren McLean, Laura Lane McNeil Mary Alice Munro, Delia Owens, Janice Owens, Kathy Reichs, Valerie Steyer's and bring it up. The end is Susan surrender. Um, any of you out there, um should know that going to the home page of friends and fiction will give you a link to our website tonight. But the work that we can do couldn't be more important. Especially now when the world feels as though we may never be able to knit it back together. But all of you are storytellers, and I put my faith in the storytellers of creating a future that is inclusive and makes the world ah safer in a better place in in our future. And, Cassandra, what a special thing to be able to offer this honor to you. There is nothing that can play with e to the women was very select group, and they all each of them were so thrilled and delighted to participate in the special room for you. Cassandra Marley said their names will be on a plaque in the Cassandra King room, and I like to think of it as the women's room. There is one special donor. Wait. Yes, E o s across the prize. And you have a beard? Yeah. Look how good looking he is. E thought I was in the wrong. I thought this was a supermodel. Convention e no, not just me. So, you know, on behalf of me and Jason and Jake, a swell as Liz and the girls. We are happy to make help make this come true. Thanks. Also, Thio tomorrow and all the all you ladies for putting this together also, You know, one of your biggest fans now is Ken eso. He was thrilled to contribute as well. My brother in law Ken Wall here in Houston. So we'll have It's mostly ladies A from there in fine print on a footnote would also be a few of the boys. Uh, that gray. So I'm thrilled this is such a great idea. And most of you may not know that, you know, Mom and I got our master's degree at the same time because we're simply the same age s e O s o. Then The reason for such a delay in that was because Mom had nowhere to write and as growing up way would never give her five minutes...

...alone to do anything, much less concentrate on writing. So a soon as she got rid of all of us and was able to focus and then probably got some space here and there she was able Teoh, right, making waves and Zion on. And that was her master's degree. And I got at the same time. So our professional tracks have taken off in parallel. And now you've got a room of your own, um, at home and now at the literary center. So it's really great. Uh, thank you all so much for doing this for for her. And And we love you, Mom. Oh, uh, moving. I've never been so shocked. I mean, seriously e a secret. No one spilled the beans. I'm shocked that no secret, Marley. That's why Jim has talked to me lately. E let alone this'll was truly wonderful gym and your brother's. Thank you so much for participating and for everyone. Marli, Thank you for coming, Charlie. Thanks for coming on. Uh, e doing That s so much. My good. Wow. I mean, that really is. I think, you know, talking about legacy. Just having that many people who love you e want to do this for you. I think that that's a legacy right there. Just to have that many people that want toe give you a special day. So we're so appreciative to be a part of it. And we're so glad that you came on to tell us a little bit about the center. And for anyone who's wondering, there is more information on our Facebook page and we will keep everybody updated as the progress continues. Well, you totally surprised me and thank you all. I'll never thank you enough. I'm I'm just so we love you. We love you. I love you way we're going to kick you out But we love you. Talk anymore anyway. Way you know, of course, you gotta figure out how to leave. I see. But you all have Thio when your new book comes out When you when you when you go out? And I'm supposed to say that the paperback of my book is coming out November the tent Good for you. So on that note. So while you're figuring out that I'm going to tell everyone it hit me when Jim was on that he is a doctor. Her son Jim, and he is a specialist in Alzheimer's. And he was involved in Alzheimer's research. And he is the one I interviewed when I wrote the favorite daughter away. The information about research and the drugs that were coming up and all that kind of stuff. So that's cool. I e a lot of serendipity tonight. A lot of Sandra. Yeah, No kidding. Wasn't that beautiful? Who? That was wonderful. It was really special to be a part of, and I don't really know how to follow that up, but we're We're just gonna be Oh, baby. But that was that was incredible. And it was really special to get to be a part of it. We're gonna take a couple of really quick reader questions Were running a tiny bit long tonight, Um, especially for their tech difficulties. But I just wanted to remind everyone that South Main book company in Salisbury, North Carolina, is offering 10% off of all of our books online and in store when you mentioned friends and fiction and there's a link under our announcements on Facebook. Um, Kristen, would you like to ask us a question from a reader? Yes. So my first question is, why is this the first night on friends and fiction? I decided to put on eyeliner like What is it with me? A little right? What? It Except to that, you know, I was coming. Kristen, I forgot everything. Okay. Sorry. So the reader question is from Barbara Eliska. Whoa. Check what would be the...

...one piece of advice wisdom you would want to leave for your Children. Something for them to always remember either about you or about themselves. I think that's a great question. And Barbara, I'm sorry if I pronounced your name incorrectly. Anybody e love it like I'm hosting and no other questions we're going to be. And like, I haven't really thought of my Christian. Who do you want to take him first? Yeah, sure. Okay, So the one piece of advice or wisdom I would want to leave for for my child, you know, I have the sense that she's talking about just kind of in our personal lives, not attached to our books. And for me, I would say that one of the things I say often to Noah is it's nice to be successful, but it's better to be nice. So I feel like that's kind of the piece of advice I want him to remember, because I think that we live in a society that's so success oriented and we're your accomplishments are counted and you know your money is counted and all of those things. But at the end of the day. All we have is what's in our heart. And that's something I try to reinforce to him as often as I can, because I think it's an important thing for Children to remember, but important thing, an important thing for all of us to remember that at the center of everything is just kindness and and the way you greet the world in the way you treat the world. You know, I have Thio Echo that that was exactly what I was going to say. I'm sorry. It's probably a universal, you know, for you to be kind, especially today with the pandemic, you know, being mindful of others and everything. It's, um you know what is? It's such an important lesson that the world doesn't revolve around you. It revolves, you know, it's what you can give to others. So I just echo what you say. That's what I've always told my kids and not the lie, never it up with you. Wait a minute. But what are the five of us I'll do for a living? Don't we all lie for a living getting e? We make things up. There's a E, not as we do kids every day. What about you? I would love for my kids and my grandkids to figure out how to be true to themselves on and not to follow. Um, not to follow the mob, not to follow what everybody else does. But toe listen, Thio their inner voices, which hopefully we have reinforced, uh, And I guess I'm thinking about what my mother used to say. Which was, you know, remember who raised you. Yeah, you know, they would. When we would mess up, there were five of us. You know, my mother or father would say we didn't We didn't raise you like that. Hmm. I I guess I would just, like, smack him upside the head and said, Remember who raised you? That's awesome. Taken one patty. Yeah, she stole mine. But what happens a lot She gets him like you're and she looks at my nose a funny one, and it's actually me and she zero right into your bomb. Great. E would if I had to. Besides, call your mom, which is keep giving to them since they're grown and gone. Come home for the holidays like that's it. But don't bring them Yeah, but don't bring your long they dio bring it. If you're gonna come home, just come home anyway. If there was only one, and I I echo Cathy. I know it sounds trite, but I tell them all the time I've written them all a letter when they graduated from high school and we're heading to college. And if we pursue what others expect of us instead of what our individual souls call for, we won't give the world the gift that we are and we have to pack up. Even they have to pack up my expectations to Dad's expectations. Right? Um and, you know, my daughter lives in Hawaii and...

...is on a different path than I ever was, but at the same time, that's what I told her to follow what your soul calls for and not what other people expect of you. So we tell them that, and then it's hard to swallow, but yeah, So I'm gonna remember not to tell, will that I'm gonna be like, just do whatever your mom says. Yeah, Your heart. No. Yeah, yeah. Those air. All really amazing pieces of advice. Okay. And ladies, this is so terrible. we have so many more great things to talk about. But I feel like we need to skip ahead because we're running a little long tonight, so I think we're just gonna have to skip straight to announcements, Unfortunately, because I really wanted to hear all sorts of other things. But how can you remind us about our new podcast and how people can listen? Yes. So our podcast, We're really excited about this, and we have some exciting things coming up later. But you can listen toe every episode on our podcast, and they're slowly filtering in and you can listen to them on wherever you listen to podcasts, Um, whether it's on your iPhone or even on the computer. And now Amazon has podcast and they're free and you can listen toe other episodes. I know sometimes you all are looking on our page for old episodes, and they're hard to find, and you can find them on the podcast and just listen to them in the car or while you're walking or wherever you are. Awesome. Um, Mary Kay, we have got some really exciting things coming up on Sunday next week. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Yeah, well, we Sunday we're gonna have Viola shipment, and I know you're seeing that picture of a guy. But in real life, Viola is the incredible Raid Wade Rouse. And he'll be telling us about his latest book, The Heirloom Garden, and what's coming next for him and as a special treat and attribute Wade, who has interviewed many a real housewife for People magazine. We're all going to debut are really housewife tagline on It's done a drama. Yeah, I'm uneasy thing for five writers. It was not. It was a lot on born, um, We've got a super exciting first time thing that we're doing right, Sean? Are you going to show us that graphic? Oh, wait. A fan. A boy. So Sean rocks the world way. Yeah, she's the savior of the universe Tonight show on it over us tonight. Sounds like out. Yeah are so excited. The friends and fiction. So what's going on? The virtual road and our friends at Page and Palate and Fair Hope Alabama are handing over the reins to us, allowing us to play hostesses at their virtual launch event. For one of I think all of our idols. That's Fannie Flagg celebrating her highly anticipated new novel, The Wonder Boy of Whistlestop, So we really can't stress strong enough. We want you to join me. Mary Kay Andrews, Paddy Callaghan, Henry Mary, Alice Munro, Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson Harvey. Thursday, November 12 6 PM Central time Which is What Time is it? A. 77 Heaven Yeah, numbers Don't Let ever Let me new members as well. Lively interview in discussion with the beloved actress comedian in Academy Award nominee and New York Times best selling author uh was fried green tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe and Purchase, and Fanny's new book from Page and Palate is required to attend, and I really want to. Stress is to you. Um, the zoom link will be emailed after you purchase your book at the store and you'll get a autograph book so go toe.

You'll find the link on our website. Go to page and palate and reserve your space. Now you do not want to miss Fannie Flagg. I've interviewed Flag and you do not want a experience that you wanna mess. I'm super excited. I'm uber Yeah, right now. Kristin, can you tell us about our amazing episode next week. Yeah, gosh, I feel like we have so many exciting things going on. E. I'm kind of impressed. We sound pretty impressive. Cool E other hanging with the cool kids. So we are excited to welcome Brit Bennett next week. She, of course, is the author of one of the most talked about books of the summer, the number one New York Times bestseller. The Vanishing Half. So we also have a little surprise in store for you. So I will just say that next week's episode will be like no episode of friends and fiction you've seen so far. So mark your calendars now and be sure to join us next Wednesday, November 4th, right here at 7 p.m. Eastern cannot wait. I love that book so much. I mean oh my God, about talkto brilliant, powerful. Exactly. Mary Alice. Speaking of that was a good time to start. Can you please remind us one more time about our bookseller of the week? Yes. Hold on, E What? I know where it is, but it's been such a crazy night. Its's been a crazy South Carolina. And remember, everybody is offering 10% of all our books in person and online. And the link Don't forget you'll find it. If you go to our Facebook page, the link will be in our group. And if you're lucky enough to stop by this charming store in person just mentioned friends and fiction. All right, ladies. Well, that was I think I was one of my favorite shows. That was so great. I'm kind of a Clement e. Don't forget to tune into a special bonus episode on Sunday at 5 p.m. on our Facebook page and register a page and palate for Fanny And thank you, Thio Each one of you So much for tuning in each week We're so grateful for your support of our books on us Just people. And we hope that you feel how much we're supporting you and love you right back. Oh, wear a hat. So could I. E Happy Halloween, Everyone way in our in our tech thing tonight way when you guys go vote go vote right way Our next episode Okay, Voting. I mean I know you all know that, but it's important. So very serious. Thank you. You have you all voted Yes, I have Thio. Yeah, Tom and I voted absentee. And then he insisted that we put stamps on the absentee ballot before I dropped it in the county. Dropbox Just That's just okay, Justine Keay. Alright, Bye. Right. You've been listening to the friends and Fiction podcast. Be sure to subscribe to the friends and fiction podcast wherever you listen. And if you're enjoying it, leave a review. You can find the friends and fiction authors at w w w dot friends and fiction dot com A swell as on the Facebook group page. Friends and fiction come back soon. Okay? There are still lots of books writing tips, interviews, publishing news and bookstores to chat about goodbye.

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