Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 6 months ago

Friends & Fiction with Tia Williams & TJ Newman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Fab Four welcome two authors on a special episode of the show dedicated to libraries that was simulcast to the digital feed for the US Book Show. On the first half of the show meet Tia Williams, author of the smash hit novel SEVEN DAYS IN JUNE. Tia discusses her rise as an author from writing YA and romance while simultaneously working her way up themastheads at major beauty magazines like Glamour, Essence, and Elle.On the second half of the show we meet indie bookseller turned flight attendent turned author TJ Newman to hear all about her debut novel FALLING. TJ wrote the book during red-eye flights while her passengers slept and regales us with the story of finally getting the call from an agent that changed her life after a mountain of rejections.On the after show, the founders and hosts of the F&F Official Book Club, Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardner join the Fab Four to talk about the club reacing 12k members, what's coming up in the next few months, and we get a preview from MKA, PCH, Kristin, and Kristy of their 2023 novels.

Welcome to friends and fiction. For New York Times best selling authors, endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Kristin Harmel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing. To highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hello, it is Wednesday night and that means we are right here with you for friends and fiction. We have an amazing evening ahead of us, so let's get started. I'm Christin Harmel, I'm Christy Woodson Harvey, and Patti's muted and I am the text savy one. I am Patty. How him any why, isn't very good introducing herself. I had to help. I'm Erica Andrews, and this is friends and fiction. Millions of tech problems for New York Times as selling authors and the stories to support independent bookstores, authors and Librarians. Tonight we'll be talking with best best selling authors Tia Williams and TJ Newman, both of whom had huge hit books in two thousand and twenty one that are brand new in paperback right now. Will also be talking in the aftershow about the upcoming two thousand and twenty three books by the four of us. To make sure to stick around for that. But before we get rolling, we have to raise a glass to marry Kay Andrew's first staying on the New York Times best seller list for the third week. Road Workers, Mary, can I know? I know, my husband apparently fell down on the job. He was my Stute, my steward. I don't know. Come on, Mr Mka. Where's the champagne? Where Holy One? Exactly? So we'd also like to give a special welcome tonight to those of you attending the US book show, especially our librarian and bookseller friends and our friends at publishers weekly who put the show together. We talk a lot UN friends and fiction about how important independent booksellers are to us as authors and as readers, because when we started friends and fiction at the beginning of the pandemic, one of our main concerns was for indie booksellers who'd had to close their doors. But just as important in our development as readers and writers are libraries and librarians. And that's just one of the many reasons why, when we were thinking, Hmm, who can we partner with for our podcast, we had a friends and fiction podcast that was separate than the show and we wanted to grow it. So we asked Ron Block of rat librarian who you just met and branch manager for the Cyahoga County Public Library System. Let's say that fast. The Kuyahoga County Public Library System, one of the the number one, one of the number one systems in the country in Ohio, to join us. Ron, like so many librarians across the country, has a very deep passion for books and has his finger on the pulse of what readers are reading. And, of course, now he's the host of our friends and fiction writers block. Get it, Ron Block, writer's block podcast. Thank you to Mka. And it features a new episode every single Friday and the way it's difference than the show is that we don't just talk fiction on there. We talked to so anybody that has to do with publishing, writing, other librarians, songwriters, behind the scenes, librarians, booksellers, editors, agents. So anything to do with this magical world shows up on our podcasts on Fridays. Yeah, and I know we all have such fond memories of libraries growing up. Yeah, you know, I can remember my mother hurting all five of her children, including me, onto the book when will be no, when it made its monthly stopped at the shopping center near our house. We didn't have a lot of money for books, but after the six of us, including my mom, checked out the maximum number of books allowed, the tires on that rose by a couple of inches. My Gosh, I have the best memories of the library. We used to go every single week and I remember being in the fourth grade, which is funny because that's called of my son is now. But I was like in the stacks...

...and we were kind of in a hurry and I was looking for a book to take on vacation. We're going to be gone for a few days and I just wanted to take one book, so I was looking for a big one and I remember seeing a spine. That is that a tree girls in Brooklyn, and I remember consciously thinking a book about a tree, like how is it that big. It seems kind of boring, but like, okay, whatever like, I'll try it. And of course a tree girls in Brooklyn is like my all time favorite book. I think I've read it every year since. But I was the same age as Francy Nolan and that but the first time that I read it, and we were these little girls from totally totally different worlds and totally different time periods, we were thinking about the same things and wondering about the same things about our lives and I think all these years later, I can look back and realize that that's when I really learned the power of story and how it connects us through time and space and makes us understand world it will never be a part of. Yeah, I remember being in middle school, being the new kid for the fourth year in a row and not knowing what to do with myself during lunch hour or free period and hiding in the library because the library was my sanctuary and in many ways it still is. And of course I remember the summer's sent checking out the Max number of books and carrying home that bag of possibilities, oh bag of possibilities. Love that. That's so true. So you know, libraries are so much more than places to find books. Their places to gather, to access local services, to vote, to connect to the Internet and to find community. So to all of you librarians out there tonight, especially to our very own roun block, thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Yes, and we'll be talking to TIA and TJ about their love of libraries to in the meantime, I know you heard a little bit at the Front End, but have you heard about the four of us being well, actually it's the six of us, because meg and Ron are with us. We are on the road together. We had the most amazing time on the Jersey shore last week. We got to meet so many of you. We would hear your name would be like I know you, I know you, but we had never met in person. And we have one event left this season, a final chance to see us all together. This summer. We are having a luncheon event on July twenty one and Rehobe it beach Delaware. We really hope, if you're anywhere near or far, that you can join us on the road for this big friends and fiction live celebrations. And don't forget now, as you know, we continue to encourage you to support indy booksellers one and where you can, and one way to do that is to visit our own friends and fiction bookshop dot org page, where you can find Tia's books, TJ's books and books by the four of us and our past guests at a discount. All right, now, I am so excited to get going because we have two great guests tonight. So let us welcome the first of our two guests, the amazing tea Williams. Tia began her career is a magazine beauty editor, working her way up the mastads of several publications, including L Glamor and essence. She also pioneered the beauty bog industry with her award winning long running site shake your beauty. I love it. I love that. Her novel the perfect fine when the African American Literary Award for Best Fiction in two thousand and sixteen. It also received rave reviews in the Washington Post, essence, cosmopolitan and more. Gabrielle Union Stars in the Netflix adaptation coming soon. So envious. No, I want to hate her, but I just can't. Guys I know launched in June here. His play, this novel seven days in June was a Reef Witherspoon Book Club Pick and instant New York Times best seller. Current Tia currently works as an editorial director at a stay laughter companies and she lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter. Sean. Could you bring Tam Oh? Her hair is fobulous tonight. I say she's so brainy that it looked like it was her picture. I know I'm actually talking on my phone. I'm like trying to prop it up because this was a last minute. I was on the computer and I'm not super techy and it wasn't connected. So we have some technical difficulties. So which if your phone looks great, if I disappear, it's because the phone was flipped over. Just he likes just. So here give her will tea welcome. We are so happy to have you with US tonight. Can you start off by telling us about seven days in June, which is out in paperback...

...in just two weeks? So seven days in June started with a question. So I was home one Saturday night watching Romeo and Juliet with Leo and Clair Dane, as one does, and I that's sort of one of my comfort movies and I was just watching it for the first time, I had this thought that I never had before. I was like, what would have happened if of Romeo and Juliet hadn't died at the end? What if they went their separate ways, like they had this wild teenage last fueled, you know, couple days together when their separate ways, and then ran into each other again as like grown ups, as thirty five year olds, like who? Would they still have that feeling? Would it still be so real? Would it just have been a teenage, you know, Hormonal Blip? And so that's where seven days in June was born. I. So it's a story of these two famous authors who seemingly randomly meet at a literary event and sparks fly. But unbeknowns to everyone there, they actually know each other because fifteen years before, when they were seniors in high school, they spent seven very romantic days together. And Yeah, so in the present, it takes place in seven days in June and the present, and so it's like how are they going to deal with each other and reckon with this big love they had as teenager? So good, wow. Okay, so we're to start with the obvious. Seven days in June the sexual tension just ripples off the page and you've said before there's always going to be big love and big sex in my books and I know wonder you write those kinds of stories absolutely masterfully. But I've also read that you grew up reading Stephen King, and so did I. Whenever I have to give my top five books, I mentioned to stand A. People are like like, like, that's how I'm with it. It's my favorite book of all time. You haven't read the stand and you can not talk to me about it, because I love bringing I don't read some of the worst forr but I'm a big Stephen King Fan. So basically, which is like the fiction standard, like it's genie, yes, story telling her exactly. Okay, so people are always surprised to hear that about this and he's not exactly known for his crackling sexual vibes. A bit about how you found your way into the novels with big love and big sex, as you say. How did you go from those two to this? Yeah, well, so Stephen King is my favorite author and honestly like reading his books as an adolescent and you know, as I got older, it's just teaches you everything. You need to know about how to tell tight good story period. It doesn't matter what genre you're working in. But I had a it was like a duel obsession. So my mom was obsessed with romance novels. I grew up in the s big paperback Romance Novel Era and she would keep this stack by the tub in her and my parents bathroom and it was always the books were really fat because of the steam. Oh, I love like from from the TUB and me and my little sisters would sneak in there and read, like, you know, at the most inappropriate ages, like we were reading Jude Debeaux and Kathleen widowist and, you know, wow, and then like the Contemporary Romances to like Jackie Collins and Judith crats and Harold Robins, and, you know, I was like, Oh, you have to have sex in the story, like that's, you know, obviously, and I don't know, like something about those scenes. I don't know if I was a particularly horny adolescent, I don't know, but I was like this amazing and the skill and I started became like a Connoisaura. But like I could tell when they're like a sex team was written poorly. I mean while like a ninth grade and never had a boyfriend. Never you know, and I'm just like now, that doesn't ring true. Tea, I just have to interrupt and ask you if you have an old and all time favorite, literally steamy seen from one of those novels, so that I can go dog hear those pages. Have you ever read slowheat in heaven by Sandra Brown? No, you know, everyone washing the show. They like our in off to go again, bookshop dot org, you know, downloading it. That's awesome. Yeah, yeah, and took combine that with it. I'm just not yeah. So I think that anytime we write novels, people...

...look for us in the stories as the authors, especially people who know us in real life. And here's the thing, though. Seven days in June is about a novelist who writes sexy books and lives in New York with her daughter, which is exactly what you are. People made assumptions that you're secretly writing about yourself, and has this complicated your life or people's expectations at all? Have they come to you about it? Well, you know what's funny? The protagonist of seven days in June is so incredibly me that I forget that readers don't know me personally, so they don't know that there's so much about it. That's my story. So I'll get the one of the things about Eva it's actually has these chronic, debilitating, daily Migraines, and so I'll get these dams and hope be like wow, you really describe migraines like so, this really and so real. You have you must have had to do a lot of research and I'm just like girl, how much time you have, because I have had my it's me. I've done migrants as I was a nine year old, every single day, every day. Yeah, every day, every day. Wow, like different, you know, it's a different levels of it, you know, from manageable, like a manageable annoyance to hospital. But yeah, every day you and it's okay, we all have something right, but yeah, so, you know, there's so much of me and that character. When I when I first start writing, some days to do and I was single. I'd been a single mom for ten years. Like Eva, amicable divorce. My daughter's father lived, you know, I could see him from my window apartment. We share custody. Chronic migrains, write sexy books and hadn't been on a date in years and I actually started writing the book. When I started, I was like, you know what, I am in such a slump. I don't feel creative, I don't feel sexy, I don't know who would ever love me because all I am is this like, you know, vegetative person who's in pain all the time. And I was like, you know what, I'm going to invent a character who has all of my stuff and moves through it and finds love and happiness and everything. And don't you know that, halfway through writing my manuscript, I swiped right on the person who is now my husband. Oh yeah, there's some teasing. Manifestation. Yeah, manifesting through novel. I love it. That's amazing. It's kind of cool. Yeah, we're going to have to ask. We've got a list of Shit we need you to manifest for us to you. Okay, only works in you do what you're set like, just down, it'll happen. Okay, all right, I'm okay with that. All right, let's talk about your latest novel that we've just been talking about seven days. In June it was a reese Witherspoon Book Club Pick and instant New York Times best seller. And I have totally messed up what I was supposed to ask you. One moment. Okay, here we go. We're back on script now. We Love the kind of book publishing stories that you have. Somebody who wasn't an overnight success. Well, who you know? You've really earned it, you know, seven days in June. Yes, it was a reese pick and it catapult you to another level. But you tell us about the struggle you had with the previous book, the perfect fine. It was definitely a struggle. So I wrote my first novel when I was I published it and when I was twenty five, and then I wrote some way novels, nonfiction, and then I didn't write for a long time and then came the perfect find. And when we were shopping it around in two thousand and fifteen, I was rejected by every single public every every single traditional publisher everywhere. And this is coming from, you know, someone who's the beauty director at Glamor and l like these, but you know I buy lines for years. This is someone who'd already been and traditionally published. And you know what was really sad is that? So the perfect find is about a fashion editor, a magazine fashion editor, who loses her job and has to start over and fall in love with a guy half her age, just supporting and the feedback I kept getting was, oh, this is so fun, it's so sparsely, it's so sexy and cute. Is there any way you can work in sort of some sort of mention about how hard it is to be a black woman in a white profession...

...fashion? Or maybe we should change the industry, because I don't know how believable it is to have the protagonist be a black editor at a fashion magazine and I'm like, you're looking at her, wow, I did that, I am that and yeah, even if I wasn't, why can't we exist there, like you know? And it was just really, really frustrating and sad because, you know, everything that you hear is as a black person about the industry. It was. It's true, it was true. You know, it's very it was very monochromatic, very gatekeeping, and black stories needed to be presented in a very specific way, in a way that the publishers felt was was was most easily marketable. Stories about enslaved people, stories about civil rights, a lot of nonfiction, a lot of you know, struggling and gets depression. We are not symbols of oppression. So and we deserve to be to, you know, live in a delicious story just for the sake of living in a doorsius store. Yes, so it really sucked. I finally found like a small, very small publisher. was almost like self publishing on my own. And Yeah, and it ended up being a success. And I don't have snapchat because I still don't know how to use it. I fight. I think it's so not intuitive, but someone sent me a screenshot of Gabriel Union snapchatting it on vacation, like she's reading it on vacation. I died. Long Story Short, it just like I love this, let's make this a movie. And Yeah, so that was the happy ending for the perfect fine, which I didn't think would happened. And now with it. That's amazing, I mean. And so now you're turning seven days in June into a TV series. Any in can you tell us any secrets? Tears? I would, but I won't show anyone else. Yeah, I would, but there's nothing to tell yet because we're just now getting started on everything. So exciting now. But yeah, it's really exciting. I never worked on a TV show or anything like that. So this is all new, very thrilling. I think we're all grinning because for just we all are like so happy. It's a great your success. Yeah, yeah, thank you. Well, we love to hear and we liked and we love to amplify. Yeah, absolutely. Well, I think if you really, I mean it sounds so pollyanna to be like if he's sick, what it? It'll happen, because you're not guaranteed anything, and there certainly are no you know, you don't get a trophy for trying. Now you but I think that if you know you're a writer, you know when your stuff is good and you know when it sucks. Right, I knew this was good and I knew that the feedback would was unreasonable. And you know, you know when you when you hear good feedback from your agent or an editor and you, you know, work it in and it makes you better. And I knew that what they were telling me was bullshit. Yes, and so I just couldn't in the name of like creative integrity. All, I love what I had, you know what I mean, like there's just there's just no way, and I knew it was good and so I stuck with it. If I didn't know it was good, I might I would have given up because it was devastating to get all those rejections. The worst. Well, you are a lot of yeah, you were a lot of hats me beyond you easily. I mean you're a huge success in so many parts of your life. It's too easily. Can just skip that because you know, as we said, you're the editorial drit and US a lot or you've been a beauty editor for I am now glamor and lucky and teen people and essence, and you've written a lot of personal pieces for magazines. Want that I want to ask you about in a minute. But I think we're all wondering how do you juggle your other jobs with your role, is a writer, and how do you think that your experience, and you're in the corporate beauty world, has influenced your writing? So they answer the first question? Not Well, I am not very good balancing at all and I have to tell the absolute truth because I feel like it would be anti woman to pretend and it is not. It's not. But you know what, I think that this is I have not vetted this. You know through my therapist. This is extute talking. So take it with a grain of salt.

But already we are pretend psychotherapist. So it's yeah, you've come the right place. I'm yeah, I'm this is circle of trust. So I feel like having this disability, this invisible disability that I've had my whole life, has given me something to fight against. It like gives me a chip on my shoulder, like I'm not going to let this, you know, stop me or in me. And it's the kind of thing, like with migrains, if you pack it all up and go to bed, you'll just be in bed for the rest of your life. I never would have done anything so like you kind of have to keep going, putting one foot in front of the other and having all this ambition and having these like stories just burning to get out, and, you know, having this is the security of a corporate career, but then also having this creative outlet, like all of those things felt really necessary to keep me going. And but that's not to say that in any way do I balance it healthily at all. I mean I barely slept in the last of the past three days. My next Madea script is juice is do on June first, don't you know, I put on this cute shirt. You should see what's happening from the ways down. It's a mess. It's a best but I feel like if something is that important to you, then you treat it the way you treat breathing air. Like you just you're uncompromising. You have to do it, you have to find the time and it'll all come together. Yeah, like, UN like. Yeah. Well, I mentioned some of your personal pieces, but whenever our favorite doesn't mother, stay letter that you write to your daughter. That was published in Glaimer in two thousand and sixteen and it's called an open letter to my seven year old Black Latina daughter. I love reading stuff that you wrote back to you. Sorry, but just because everyone on the show hasn't run. But in it you write you have a big personality, Lena. You're hilarious, opinionated and wicked creative. Don't make yourself smaller to get the basketball stars, the class president or the badass musician. Be The basketball star, the class president of a badass musician. It's such great advice, first of all, but second of all, I feel that echoes of that in your writing and since we're all still works in progress, I'd love to ask you, do you feel like your books have the same kind of important message about not being afraid of who we are, and do you think that's an important message for adult women to hear? Yeah, I mean, I think definitely. Why do I feel like I'm going to cry? So that that seven year old is thirteen now. It's just the same thing. How's it going with Lena? She's good. She's back there like playing roadblocks with her friends and like screaming and I'm so nervous that you're you guys are going to hear her. But she inspired Audrey and seven days and two. I mean that's that's my daughter. Yeah, I feel like, you know, when I was going up, I was definitely a Weirdo. There's not a lot of like black nerd representation or like black Weirdo representation life. When I was born in one thousand nine hundred and seventy five, like you had the cause of the show where everyone was perfect. You have, you know, like it just wasn't there wasn't a lot of us out there. So I always was felt really weird, like my interests were incredibly niche and my sister's were even weirder than I was. Like my sister was like, it's my ten birthday, I want to have a science birthday party. But the thing is is that my parents every little thing that we were interested in. You know, if it's fossy this week, next week it's the Kennedy curse, then it's it like just ran up. They would indulge everything that we were into, and it wasn't until I grew you know, I went to college and went away, I met like a wider swath of people that I realized that that was not a universal experience. Yeah, and also I feel like in a lot of black families or families of color like you, parents tend to push you towards what will make what will just be a Dr a lawyer, like whatever just makes the Myn like what, we don't have time for you to go figure out how to be a writer in New York, like who you know? And my family wasn't like that. They were like, you know, not yourself out, you got trade as you you know you or you know, go follow your dreams, and I try to get that across in my books too, like they're always black people from all different walks of life, because we are not a monolith. Always New York because I feel...

...like it's such a fascinating place where you go to really reinvent yourself and to become like what you always thought you would, what you always wanted to be but couldn't be in our time. That you wrote about that, that I like highlighted in the book because I just thought it was so like spot on about just being able to like leave that past behind. Yeah, and no one ever thank you, but it's true. Like I have friends who I don't know anything about who they were before they rolled up here at two thousand and two after college, you know, and it's fine because none of us really want to talk about whatever because now we're this and this is it. In I think that's really interesting and I just like to sort of thing that individuality message from the rooftops. Yeah, when you do that so well, which is awesome. Soutia. We also wanted to ask you, since we have a lot of librarians tuning in tonight as part of the US book show, can you tell us what role libraries played in your development is a reader and a writer, where they important to you growing up? Libraries were great thing, they were everything, and I don't know if this is how it is with all libraries. Or maybe this was a favor dream, but like I would spend summer. We would spend summers with my grandmother, my grandma, my grandparents house, my dad, our family with station in Germany and during the summer as we would go back home to DC and well, my parents stayed in Germany and my grandma had all of these live library books from Hillcrest Heights Library in Maryland, but they were hers, like she told me that she if you paid a certain amount of money to the library, you could keep the book. Was She just telling me that, or is that because there were stamps in all her books? They were the like cards that everything, and I was like, Oh my God, grandma bought all these books from library. Now I'm looking back and I'm like, I allowed to take those books that you may be hearing from the Hill Crest Library. You're you're fine. Is like Fiftyzero. It might be am the story might games. I think that what do you call it? When the time is run out to go after somebody, that statue. But that's where I first like sort of started understanding them. I was like this, it's just just something seems so glamorous and cool like a first of all, I love that you could see the dates in the stamp, like the dates of all the people that have taken it out, as like, you know, history in the book and just having an unlimited supply of books to read. Like I would go to our library Um and just nerd out on everything. I remember the dewet desk fol system. I remember, you know, the microfiche and like copying pages to take home and like study. And my sister was obsessed with soap operas. She only watched two of them. My dishes, like eight years old. Again, niche, you know, interest, and she watched guiding light in general hospital, Luke and Laura, Luve and Laura. I mean, what can you do? And but she would go to the library and go to the periodical section, get all of the soap opera digress like from the past two years, read up on all the other shows that she didn't watch. But because of her extensive research in Soap Operas Digest The library, She could write a dissertation on all my children, days, our lives all but never seen an episode. But that's what I is that funny and that's what I think of. What I think of libraries like just supporting whatever, like you know, research and interest that you have, and making you a smarter, more interesting person. I love that absolutely. Well, Tia, thank you so much. I feel like we are all smart, more interesting people for having talk to you tonight. This was so lovely and it's great. It really flies. We're so bad. We that we managed to work out the connection issues. And, Tia, I loved seven eight days in June so much I listened to it on audio book and I never realized how strange it was to listen to sex scenes on audio while you're driving on the highway until I listen to your book. But it was worth it because it was amazing. So to everyone out there, seven days in June. It's out in paperback. In two weeks you can get it in a hardcover. Now you can listen to it on audiobook and be inappropriately things as you're driving along. But no, it's amazing. And Tia, thank you so...

...much for being with US tonight. It was such a pleasure to talk. Yes, so much fun talking to you think. Thank you. It was my pleasure. By S to one nineteen. All right, now we are excited to welcome our second guest of this double header TJ Newman, another author who writes about strong, it's tough heroes and heroines, but in a completely different way. You know, we met he. We met Tj at the SAVANNA book festival. TJ Is Newman is a former bookseller turn flight attendant. She worked for Virgin, at Lana and Alaska Airlines from two thousand and eleven to two thousand two, two thousand and twenty one, and she wrote most of her dead you novel fallowing on Cross Country Red Eye flights while her passengers were sleeping, and that's giving me anxiety right this minut. I know, I don't know how she did that. I was like, oh my gosh, I would never be able to do that. But anyway, good morning. America called falling and unput down a both thriller. USA Today called it a rich and assured debut, and it received glowing recommendations from authors including James Patterson, Dana Ivanovitch and Diana Gaveldon, as well as start reviews from publishers, Weekly Book List and my Ray Journal. I wish she'd gotten some more like lifting now. Yeah, maybe we can. No one really liked that. He loved meeting her at the Savanna Book fastball and as a former independent bookstore own seller, TJ calls Phoenix, Arizona home now. Yeah, we're so excited to bring her on. Son, can you bring you to day and Yay, hey, t daddy. Oh, it's so good to see you guys again. How are you good? It is happy to see you. We're so glad you could come on. I'm so glad I could too. And I have to say for everybody that's that's watching, if you don't know these ladies in real life, I have to say that when I went to the SAVANNA book festival it was my first book festival on, you know, being an author being there. I didn't know a single soul that was there. I was very nervous. This is my debut novel. This is like, you know, publishing in a pandemic. You don't get to meet people. It's very, you know, isolating. It is just you and your house talking to zoom. So this was my first like anything, and I was really nervous and I have to tell you these four ladies just immediately took me under their wings and made me feel so welcome and so comfortable and I felt like I wasn't alone and they are as warm as in person as they are here, and I just I just want to tell you how much that meant, how well you made me feel out of the bankfully love he's years really didn't it? We did, and it didn't hurt that we were huge fans of your books, so we were coming at you as fan girls. But can you start off by telling us a little bit about falling, which just came out of paper back last week? Sure? Falling tells the story of flight for one six a flight from Los Angeles to New York, and what the passengers on board don't know is that just before they took off, the family of their pilot was kidnapped and he has been told that he can either crash the plane or his family will die. And so the story then follows the valiant, heroic efforts on the ground from the FBI and the family and the the crew and the passengers in the air in their attempts to do the impossible. It's amazing. It's such a great concept for a book and we love to talk about the seeds of inspiration on this show and especially for books like this. And you know, as we said, this is so particularly interesting because you wrote it as a flight attendant, which I just cannot imagine, like being up in the air and writing this book. I just can't believe they did that. But I read an interview at the New York Times that while you were formulating the idea for the book, you asked a pilot colleague of yours, but would you do if your family was kidnapped and you were told that if you didn't crash the plane they would be killed? And then you knew by the look on his face that you had struck a nerve. You Tell The Times he didn't have an answer and I knew I had a story. So can you talk to us a bit about how you came up with the idea how you set up pursuing it? Yeah, the what you just said was the story kind of of how it went down. The sort of moment that led up to that was I was working a flight because, as you said in my Interi I was a flight attendant for ten years and I was working a flight and I was standing at the front of the aircraft doing a security procedure that we call blocking, while the pilots are coming in and out of the bathroom. So I'm standing at the front of the plane and I'm staring out at the passengers and the flight was a red eye. Those were my favorite flights to work. That's how I was able to write on the plane was I put everybody to sleep and then I...

...went into the Galley by myself and got to work. But yeah, so it was a red eye and everyone's asleep, you know, stark and it's cold and I'm staring out at the passengers and I kind of had this thought that their lives, in my life and and my crewmates lives and all of our lives, or in the hands of the pilots, which is fairly obvious. Actually that's not exactly a ground breaking but it was the first time that I'd kind of considered the flip side of that, which which you know, is with that much power and responsibility, how vulnerable does that make the pilots? And I just couldn't shake it and a couple days later the sort of the concept had solidified into a concrete scenario and that's when I threw it out to the captain that I was fine with on my next trip, who was a friend of mine, and I just threw that out, like I like, I said, you know, what would you do? And by the look on his face I knew that was it. I knew there was I knew there was a story there because I could see that he was terrified. And once I realized that there wasn't a page in the manual to reference for the situation, that's when I knew I had to write the story to answer the question for myself. He didn't report you to the KSA's funny, like like I've discovered in this whole process of publishing this book that apparently people don't think like pilots and flight attendants do, which is that we're constantly thinking about what can go wrong. It's just that's how we're trained to think so that in the unlikely event that something does go wrong, we're ready. We already know. We've already sort of done like a dress rehearse on our head of this is what I would do, this is what protocol says, this is what I would do under these circumstances. So it really didn't feel weird to be thinking that and asking those questions, because that's what we do. What would you do if that's that's just sort of what we do. I love the use said unlikely event, because I was like an then likely event of a wetter landing devices under your seat. I have read that you were rejected by forty one agents before one bit and then that agent went on to sell this book and a too book deal for seven figures. And you know, I think that's kind of a theme of tonight and something that we've been talking about is like, this is not always an easy road and you never really know what's going to happen. So can you talk a little bit about like that feeling in that moment of having just all of this rejection and sticking with it for so long and then emerging victorious? Like, what was that like? Well, even the moment leaving to that moment was a story, so I'll share it quickly because it's a good story too. Yes, forty one rejections. All of them said no, which I'm sure all of us, if you're in this industry, you're used to rejection, you're used to hearing the tough answers. So and you're also everyone here, I'm sure, knows, like you feel them, even if you get used to yet you still feel each and every one of them. So I was. I it was a tough road, but I just kept going and one day I was at my one day I get a phone call from an unidentified la number and I of course, you know, decline it. Send it to boy smail because you know, robe a call someone you know real it or the you know. Just send it to voicemail your car it's time to get here. Absolutely guarantee exactly. They can leave a message and I'll delete it later if that's what they want. But you know, you just blocks and send to send a voicemail. So several days later I'm at my parents house eating dinner. My phone rings again, unidentified La Number. I don't think anything of it. Send it to voicemail. Then something kind of clicks and I'm like, I don't usually get la numbers. That's kind of weird. was that the same dinn at night? Then I go back and that's where I find the voicemails that I've missed from the one agent who is showing any interest in anything, asking to see the complete manuscript. So of course I start freaking out because I've just blown it. I've sent this agent, you know, voicemail twice. So I'm like great, I had one shot and I just flew it, so that I frantically, like, you know, try to like compose myself and call back. Of course it goes to voicemail, fur the reinforcing that I've completely blown my one opportunity and a couple days go by and I don't really hear and the whole time it's that like should I send an email? Should I should I call again? Should I do? You know, what do I do? And I had a trip scheduled to go backpacking, but the friend of mine, which would mean that we'd be, you know, for like a week in the wilderness with no cell phones, completely non contactable. So I call him and I say, Hey, you know, this is TJ Newman. We're playing a little bit phone to I I...

...just want to let you know that I'm going to be out of you know, out of communication for a week. So if I don't hear from you by the end of the night, no worries all. Circle back, you know, in a week when I'm out of the woods. Just want to give the heads up. He doesn't call back. The airport, we drive up to win Arizona, check into our hotel because we're leaving the next morning, go out to dinner. Driving back to the hotel, my phone rings and it's at La Number and I'm like now, mind you, I haven't told my friend that I'm writing a book. I'm told really no one in my life that I'm writing a book, and certainly not that I'm like trying to get it published and that I'm Korean agents. So we're driving along, my phone rings and I just pull the car over to the shoulder on the road and it's dark. We're in the woods. My friend has no idea what's going on. She's just looking around like what is happening, and I just throw the car and park and I go this is going to be very strange, but I promise you I will explain everything, but I've got to take this call, and she's like okay, so she sits there, I take the call. We have this long conversation. Of course I'm answering phone. Me Like Hi, this is Tj, and she's like Jah, and I'm started confident, talking about manuscripts and books and all this, you know, completely faking the whole plan because I'm like Shit, the phone is like shaking in my hand I'm so nervous. So we have this called the call goes amazing and it was just like that moment where you know that like something special just happened. So I hang up the phone and it's just dead silent in the car and she looks at me like what was that, and I just turned to her and I go, I don't know for sure, but I think there's a really good chance when tire life just changed. Oh Wow, and it had. Yeah, I feel like you just echoed what Tia said, which is I think people imagine that we write about get an agent, get a book, like it's just this, this, this one rolls into the next and we constantly, even after published, have to hang onto this belief that the story we're writing is the story we're supposed to be writing, and to hang onto that kind of flotation device or, yeah, to use it. But how how did it feel to you to constantly be working on this and conceiving this whole plane crash scenario while you're flying? Like, in other words, did you feel more insecure on your flights as you delve deeper, or did you, as you mentally went through the worst case scenario you felt? How did it affect you in the air? Is I what I'm trying to ask. You know, it was a fascinating process and that I can't tell you how many times I would be stuck and I woantn't know what comes next and I would just be, you know, just road blocked, not knowing how to person either. Yeah, yeah, exactly, exactly standard operating procedure, right. So, yeah, and it was really fortunate that I got to you know, I've described it before and I think this really works in that like it felt like I was like writing a movie, but the set was already built, the costumes were made, everybody was cast and was like on set ready to go every day. They just didn't have lines. We just don't have a story. So because I was like every day in that environment, the story in the lines like sort of like came out of it. And I can't say how many times I would, you know, be thinking about something in the back of my mind and a pilot that I would with was with with like say something just like randomly and I would sort of stop and go, we what did you just say? And then I'm like week. So, so if this happens, then you're telling me that this would happen next and the next thing. I know like my problem has been solved and I know exactly where to go from there. We were talking about this on the stage in I think it was Kiyahoga less a couple weeks ago, about when you commit to a story there are these it's almost like these metal filaments and your the magnet, like if you're paying attention and listening to the past silet or listening to the passengers. Sometimes, not always, but sometimes you get what you need if you're paying attention. I totally agree, and especially writing on the plane. Like a lot of people often ask like how did they like the characters? You know, how did you and I'm like, I was just character studying all day long. Why the attending to get paid to people watch and I just sort of like to the next level. Yeah, that's awesome. Okay. So, Tj,...

...this is your first novel and the reception has been pretty amazing. Does that put pressure on you as you move towards your second novel? Um and you know, by the way, is there a second novel? In the words yes, yes, and yes. So when I was telling the story earlier and I said, you know, my friend didn't even know that I'd written a book, that was my emo with writing falling. I I come from a long pedigree of failure and rejection. Before I decided to try my hand at this, pursuing this dream, I was pursuing another dream, which was that of being an actor in New York, you know, my Broadway dreams. So I studied musical theater in college and then I moved to New York after that, which, clearly, since we're not discussing what show I mean, you can guess how well that went. It was not pretty, it was it did not go well, and it found me moving back to Phoenix, back in with my parents, you know, and then I'm doing the like, you know, mid twenties. What do I do with my life? Now, routine, I'm back living to my childhood home, without a job, and I thought a future. What do I do? And my mom said, you know, changing hands, bookstore, look lending. Book store up the street is hiring. You should get a job there, and so I applied, got a job and fell in love, and that's kind of, you know, the the first step back to where I am now, and that's when I started writing again. That's when I started being creative again, and I really do think that my time at that bookstore is what not only started getting me here in an active way, but brought me back to being the creative person that I knew that I was, that I'd sort of lost track up during my time in New York, and so I started writing there and started doing that. Why did I tell the story? What was the question? Again, I'm just novel, second novel, second novel. I know where I'm going with this. That's why I was like, I set right. It does relate. Bear with me. Bear with me not my strong suit. When I started writing again at changing hands and I start writing stories and huntel anybody, nobody knew, because my time in New York has shown me that like putting yourself out there in front of the old and out in front of your friends and family and saying I'm taking a creative risk. If it doesn't pan out, it's really embarrassing. Yeah, and I was very much still looking my wounds from my time in New York. So when I started being creative again, because I needed to nurture that part of myself, I did it very privately, very much just for myself. And when I left the book store to go fly and then I had the idea for falling and I started writing that. I just kept with that whole theme. I didn't tell anyone. Nobody knew I was writing it and nobody know it was a dream. Nobody knew that I was doing anything, and by the time that I had finished the draft, there was literally only a handful of people that knew that I was even doing it, like really just my family, because they were like close to staging interventions because they didn't know what I did, like locked up in my home alone on my days off. So nobody knew. So that was my m and that was the only way that I convinced myself to like keep taking risks and sure that chapters terrible, but who cares, no one's ever going to read it. It's never going to leave your computer. So that was the only way that I convinced myself to just keep going and once it was a full thing that I just kept going and kept going. I kept going to where we are now, which brings me back to your question, Mary Kay. Writing the second book is not quite so secret. It's dead. I'm not feeling anybody. It's weird enough, known thing and there's expectations and yeah, they're there and I'm trying to get myself back to that place and I'm working every day and it's it's one of those things where I just convinced myself, I trick myself that I'm the only one that's going to read this, even if that's the case at all. I think we all do that too. We yeah, and I honestly think the second book is the hardest, because the first is the one that's been living inside of you for so long and that you just kind of have to get out on the page, and then the second one you're just kind of starting from scratch again and and facing all that doubt or all the expectation or, you know, all those all those things that are sort of these stumbling blocks set up to make you feel like you might fail, but you won't. This is a this first book was a great achievement. The second book is going to be too. And and it's so neat to hear, especially because of, you know, what we value so much here, and friends and fiction. It's so cool to hear that independent book store played a role in your development is a writer. So we'll talk to you a little bit at the very end about the role libraries played. But TJ,...

...if you wouldn't mind sticking around for a few minutes, we have a little bit more to talk about that. First, a few reminders from us. Have you bought your coffee from trust and coffee roisters yet? We have, and we've so enjoyed partnering with them. So, as a reminder, everyone in our friends and fiction community gets twenty percent off all bad coffee on their website with code coffee with friends. We hope that she'll use this code. Is the perfect excuse to try their brand new just released, a quarium blend. And Tonight we pick the third of three winners of our three month coffee of the month subscription with Charleston Coffee Roysters. We gave one away in March and went away in April, and tonight's winner drummer, Patty Drumma. We can, you'd let me do ters Kate back of viewing New Jersey. Yeah, she was totally randomly picked earlier today, but you should follow her on instagram. You probably know her from Book Apotomus. She has great bookish content. And don't forget that we have this fabulous book and Coffee Bundles. You can get one of our books signed, paired with the coffee of your choice, to check them all out at Charleston Coffee Roisterscom. And to all of you who haven't tried their coffee yet, we hope you'll use that twenty percent off code to do just that. It's the coffee we drink in my house every day and again, it's coffee with friends, and that's what we drink too. And to say how grateful I am to them because they helped keep us on the air. Yes, they do their sponsorship. So don't forget to join us over on our cool new social platform. It's an APP and it is called fable, which, if I was going to name an APP book club, I would call it fable. So you can read Mary Kay's the home wreckers along with the fable community, which means this. You get exclusive access to behind the scene stories, playlists, secrets and more. You can share your reactions, thought favorite quotes. It's with us and with fellow readers as you read along, and you gain access to special resources you can't find anywhere else. It is just five dollars a month to join the friends and fiction behind the book club, or you can do an annual premium for seventy dollars a year to join all the book clubs on table, including Lebar Burton. So visit fable dot co instead of calm, backslash, friends and fiction to sign up today. And just another quick reminder about our writers block podcast. Will always post links under announcements each time a new one drops. A new episode launches each Friday. On the last episode, Ron and Kristen talked to Jane Porter and Megan Crane a brought about prolific writers, friendship and community and writing. On the episode dropping this Friday, Ron and Christy talked or joy callaway about her novel the grand design, about Dorothy draver. And next week Ron and meg talk to Carter Bays, the CO creator of the wildly Popular Sitcom how I met your mother, about his debut novel, the mutual friend and MEGAS already said that's given her already given her amazing street cred with with her kids. A Sauso I can assidue is also to the mutual friend. I'm like, why didn't we think that? Yeah, I want to go from here. I know you have one friend. I can't wait to hear that podcast and it's how it's really cool that meg did it with Ron. Yeah, that that's not the norm for us, but she's so good. I mean she did the pre show tonight and I just know it was a great episode. So I can't wait to hear that. So we also want to give a shout out to the friends and fiction official book club, headed up by our friends Brenda Gardner and Lisa Harrison. They recently hit twelve housing members were so excited and they'll be joining us on the after show tonight to celebrate and to let you know what they've got coming up in the club. Okay, TJ, I have one more thing I want to talk to you about, because we have so many librarians tuning in tonight. Can you tell us about the impact of libraries and librarians on your life as a reader and as a writer? Oh huge, I mean I want to be sitting here, I want to be doing any of this without libraries. I my parents house, was the house I grew up in, was right across the street from the Dobson Ranch branch of the Mace of Public Library, and you are across the street from the library. I was walking distance, my wife distance and it was just like it was. It was everything. It was where, you know, I can remember going there with my parents when they were voting, because it was also, you know, where we voted. I can remember my first library card. It was bright yellow and I remember signing my name on there so carefully, and the the the over...

...the years, the the pen ink like blurred, like all everything. I can a laundry list of just snapshots of images of how that library shaped who I became and what I was at day, even, you know, checking out CDs. It showed me the music that I liked and the magazines that my parents went by me that I could go read. And then, you know, the books, just everything. I can still walk through in my mind where in the library, you know what case to go down to get to the Babysitner club and just just seeing all the stacks of them. I mean it's just it made me the reader that I am, which made me the person that I am, which now is my livelihood and the way that I feel fulfilled as a person. We have some right people this question. I cannot think of a better way to end the episode. So, Tj, we all we just all adore you. We had such a great time with you and Savannah, we're so happy for the success you found with this novel. We're so excited that people can get their hands on it right now and paperback. It's a great book. We recommend it to everyone and we are so grateful that you joined US tonight. Thank you so much, tejay. Okay, much absolute pleasure. Thank you, guys. This was truly lovely and I can't wait for the next time we all get to get together. Can't really yeah, exactly, so will say see seeing today. All right, good day, no, to all of you out there. Don't forget that you can find all of our back episodes on Youtube, but we are alive there every week, just like we are on facebook, and if you subscribe to our Youtube Channel, you will not miss a thing. Plus you will have access to special short clips. Make sure to stick around for the aftershow, where we will be chatting with Brenda and Lisa from our book club, and we will also be giving you a little sneak preview of our new novels coming in two thousand and twenty three. Be Sure to come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome Sarah McCoy, Chanel Clayton and Christina Lauren in the aftershow. We'll see in a minute. The in a minute. All right, everybody, welcome back, ladies, what a night. Weren't they just great guests? My Gosh, there were such great guess these are such great books and it's awesome. I feel like I want right down a lot of what they said. Yeah, I feel like they just kind of you know, yes, like the Hud. Yeah, that word, that work't that word. You know. It almost makes me wish we'd had them on together because I think that, yeah, even even when with the different kinds of books and different way, you know, different backgrounds that they came at writing from, I just think there was so much overlap in the kind of women they are and the way they persevered against the odds and, you know, and didn't listen to the voices that said No. They just said no, I'm going to do it. This is my dream, this is who I am, and I love that. I feel very those ere writers that inspire me. That's Y. Yeah, I really wanted to ask tea for some beauty tips, but I guess that would have been I did too. I was looking at her the whole time like can you come over here and like do some of me. I mean well, I when she said she was born in one thousand nine hundred and seventy five, I was like shut the front door, like, come on, she looks so good. Yeah, yes, I could absolutely benefit from her beauty tips. So two ladies who don't need to benefit from beauty tips because they are so beautiful to begin with are Lisa and Brenda, who run our friends and fiction official book club, and I know they're hanging out backstage. We can't wait to talk to them. So, Sean, would you mind bringing Lisa and Brenda on you guys. So, when are you in the car? I am in the car. You're not driving, though, right, no, I'm no, I'm parked. I'm joining you from the car. Oh my gosh, we love it. Such dedication our lives. It really does. Well, you don't ladies, huge congratulations on heating twelve thousand members. Can you even believe it? Awesome. No, can't even imagine that first conversation we had ending up in Twelvezero. No, well, we are. We you're just so grateful and so proud of you two. You've done such a phenomenal job with this book club. Brenda, can you tell us a little bit about what the Book Club is for those watching who may not know. Sure I'd be happy to the book club is once a month session where we read, we all read a book together each month, call with US and facebook lab it so that all of our members can enjoy the conversation with the author and have an opportunity to ask questions in advance and lave...

...in the chat. And so it's just a little bit. It's an indepth look at each book by, of course, you wonderful ladies, and then we've expanded it to some other authors as well. Something I love them. Just real quick I was going to say I loved that the last fifteen minutes of the chat is is like a spoilers zone, right, so for people who have read the book. And I think you don't find that a lot on these online online book talks, you know, because like usually they're spoiler free. But you know which is for the purpose of you know, if if we haven't all read it. But I like that you divide your chat so that people can stick around until the spoilers begin happening and then you really dive deep and you talk about the ending and I it's I just think it's a unique experience. Thank you. Can you have bailit like whoop. Yeah, I love the author being able to talk about spoilers, because we get to do that so in frequently. Were was a dancing around things and just really be like grow. Believe that. What is the book club up to this month? Well, we just had a fabulous discussion with Wiley cash last week, so if you guys missed it, you can check it out on our youtube page, because we are aren't now on Youtube as well. But coming up this month we're reading an amazing book that, if it's been hanging out on the New York cons heard of it. Oh, what are you about now? Haven't heard of that book. Yeah, but I'll just check it out. I think it's enough. I love it. Okay, Brandon. What we have coming up over the next months? We have some awesome books coming up. For July we're reading book lovers and on July eighteen will be talking with Emily Henry about it. August we're going to be reading the younger wife with Sally Hip Worse. That's August fifteen. In September nineteen we're doing the book of Eleanor Day or with Kimberly Brock. So we have some awesome books ahead of us in the next few months. have an awesome happy hour with Ron Block and August two on August nineteen. Yeah, you don't what it is those happy hour doll there's a present, get drink recipes and they're going to make a cocktail book because I told them to. And then you didn't you get I named you he dj. So I can say there's a cockcol book and and then you get to your book recommendations from the three of them and whoever their guest is. And you know, all of them get advanced reader copies and can just lay down some great book rex for the rest of the month. I know. But can we go back to the cocktail thing, because we saw that gets lit has a double meaning. It really does, all right, it really does. brandomly's, I can't wait to join you and the book club and talk about the home workers. We can't wait either. Looking forward to it. Yeah, we're so looking forward to it. But speaking of things we're looking forward to, with that being with the four of you, Brenda and I always want to get the scoop. So we want to know what you guys are up to next year. So, Christie, can you tell us about your book coming out in April? Yes, I'm so exciting. It's called the Summer Song Birds. I've been pestering these ladies with cover options this week, so I can wait to show everyone. It's not a pester. We Love waying and we all come right here are these eleven shades of phone color. Now they're all almost exactly the same, but steep die. That's why we do. We died with pleasure. Christie. Yeah, they just us. It's bag. But the book is called the summer of Song Birds and it is about three best friends who met at a summer camp that is the danger of closing, and so they ban together and decide that they're going to save their summer camp. But at the same time Daphne, who is one of our protagonists, is an attorney and she finds out something about her best friend, Lanier's fiance that is protected by attorney client privilege, and so she has to decide whether she is going to tell her best friend and get disbarred. She's a single mother, so it's a really big decision, even bigger than normal maybe, or if she's going to let Lanier who is her best friend Mary, this man, knowing what she knows about him. But lanier has a secret of her own that, if Daphne finds out, which maybe she does, maybe she doesn't, I can't really say, would change the way that she felt about the entire thing. Figured out how to talk about it. I know, I'm...

I'm facin. I have not figured out how to talk about it yet, so I'm gonna try. Mine comes out on May ninth, and it may ninth of next year. Obviously went to eat twenty three and it is called the secret book of Flora Leah. And guess what? That is the first time I've been allowed to say the title. So they know the secret book of florally it comes out. It is about a secret story world created by two sisters named Hazel and Flora, and that secret fairy tales solves the mystery of the youngest sister's disappearance from the countryside of Oxford, England, in nineteen forty. And I have so much more to say. But Christen, how about you? I think three or four weeks after your book, Patty, my book will come out. I think I'm early June, and it's called the Paris daughter. I love that. Where April, May, June? I think that's perfect. So I'm so excited. It's the story of you know, and I also haven't totally figured out my my pitch yet, and I think you know it takes reading it five million times through copy editing. Yeah, well, that's what's about. That's what it's about. That I'm not totally three yet, but it's the story of two mothers and two daughters in World War Two, Paris and allied bomb that falls where it shouldn't in a residential Paris suburb on a sunny Sunday, and a mystery that kicks off when not all of the people in a picturesque French book store survived the blast. And then the story picks up in New York City in one thousand nine hundred and sixty, when a chance encounter with one of the mothers of those two daughters sets the question of what happened that Tragic Day spinning back into motion again. So that's kind of a short little elevator pitch for the Paris daughter. And how about you, marry Kay, do you have any anything on tap for two thousand and twenty three? I you know, usually I have a summer book, but I won't have a summer book in Two Thousand and twenty three. How is summer going to begin? Yes, summer won't ever start in twenty took. The three of us have spring in summer books, but summer's actually not going to start. I don't know what to do. It will start with the paperback of the home wreckers. Okay, summersky goodness. Thank you for hearing that up. Yeah, I'll start in late April of two thousand and twenty three. It will start with the paper back of the home wreckers. Then we will flash forward to late September with another Christmas novella that I am not am still working on it. The title is what we am publishing called tk to come. Well, why do we use the ORK for come? I don't. I don't make these rules, Patti, but I could explain it because in journalism, if you plug in a tk, yeah, that's a very uncommon letter combination. Right, right, right, with document for tk. But if you searched a document for TC, a lot of words would come up. So tk something that'll just bring up the planks. Yep. So the title was the time was tk, but it starts in the same fictional North Carolina mountain time as the Santa suit, but this time the story involves a woman whose family owns a Christmas tree farm and they have for the past thirty years. They have cut their trees in November and truck them up to a Christmas tree strent stand and Greenwich Village where they sell Christmas trees. And this year your protagonist carry gets guilt tripped into going along to sell trees and finds holiday love and all the things in Greenwich Village so exciting. You're watching good spree that I feel like I've read the book, like I'm sorry, I'm so exciting for this one. Well, you know, we are so excited. I know we'll all join the book club next year to talk about these books. You know, it read and Lisa, you're so kind to always host us and and you know, give readers kind of the behind the scenes version of our books. And you know, I was thinking in the pre show Andrew and MEG and Ron we're talking about how that road kind of goes both both ways. It's, you know, it's the readers to the writers and the writers to the readers. And you know, and I think nowhere is that better exemplified than in our relationship with the two of you. I mean, I think the two of you began as readers of US and supporters of us and you've become two of our dear friends. You've become hard, I mean, such an integral part of...

...our community. You've done such incredible work with the Book Club and and you've in addition to the direct connection we have with readers through friends and fiction, I think the two of you are really for us and for all the authors. You feature a real pipeline between the readers and the writers that you just you're such an incredible part of this community and we're so grateful to you. So so congratulations. Congratulations on the continued success of the Book Club. Congratulations on twelve thou. Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you for well, we feel so deeply lucky and thankful to be working with you. So all. We are lucky. We're the lucky ones. We Adore you guys so much. So thank you for waiting the party. Talk to you guys about the homeworkers. I cannot wait home. Word Cot. I wore my dressed a launch party, but I know you. I think we've talked about every event. How you guys are example of friends and fiction. Don't volunteer, like unless you want to be loved birds of this like monstrous project that will, like, consume a large portion of your life. So you guys are like the costutionary tale made anything that we so so to all of you out there. Consider that your warning and don't forget to join the friends and fiction official book club if you haven't already. As you can tell, they just are doing such amazing things over there. So, everybody, this has been such a great night and we will see you next week, same time, same place, Wednesday night at seven PM Eastern as we welcome Sarah McCoy, Chanelle Clayton and Christina Lauren. Have a great night, everybody. Gonna be a Memorial Day, weekend and night. Thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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