Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 7 months ago

Friends & Fiction with V.E. Schwab, featuring G.R. Macallister on the after show

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We are thrilled to welcome the one and only Victoria "V.E." Schwab, the #1 New York Times bestselling, critically acclaimed author of more than a dozen books for adults, young adults, and middle grade readers. V.E.'s 2020 genre-defying tour de force THE INVISIBLE LIFE OF ADDIE LARUE was a juggernaut, landing on every bestseller and best-of-the-year list known to man. She joins us to talk about her new young adult fantasy novel GALLANT, coming March 1st. A vivid and lush stand-alone novel that grapples with the demons that are often locked behind closed doors, Gallant is an eerie saga about life, death, and the young woman beckoned by both. Tune in to hear about V.E.'s writing and reseach process, how she took a decade to craft Addie LaRue, and how she came to think of her latest book as her first true "all ages" read. On the after show we're joined by USA Today bestselling historical fiction author Greer Macallister who tells us all about her new novel SCORPICA. Penned under the name G.R. Macallister, this sweeping epic fantasy novel is a departure for Greer and we can’t wait to hear all about this first book in her brand-new Five Queendoms series!

Welcome to friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories. Novelists Mary Kay Andrews, Christen Hermel, Christie Woodson Harvey and Patty Callaghan Henry are for longtime friends with more than seventy published books between them. Together they host friends and fiction with author interviews and fascinating insider talk about publishing and writing to highlight and support independent book stores. They discussed the books they've written, the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love books and you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Hi everybody tonight, and that means times and Ficmen, it is the happiest native the week. You're all so happy to be here with you. I'm Christin Harmel, I'm Christy Wandson Harvey, I'm Patty Callahan Henry and I'm Mary Kay Andrews. This is friends and fiction for New York Times best selling authors endless stories, to support indie bookstores, authors and Librarians. Tonight we'll be talking with Victoria Ze Schwab and then in the aftershow will be joined by Greer mcallister, who's writing now, is g o mcallister, later in the show will also have a special announcement about Pattie's new book, so you will not want to miss that. As you know, I'm so excited about Patty that I'm as you know, we continue to encourage you to support independent booksellers when in where you can, and one way to do that is to visit our own friends and fiction book shop Dot Org in page, where you can find Victoria and greer's books and books by the four of us and our past guests at a discount. And we want to remind you taking of being really excited about what is that? Christie and Mary K have brand new books coming out. We've been talking like next season in the spring. Now we're down to saying in the next couple weeks. So Christy's the wedding veil will be out March twenty nine and Mary Kay's the home wreckers will be out on the third. And y'all, they're both so incredible and we got to be with them when they were writing them. I know how much work was put into them. I know the twists and the turns and the plot lines and Y'all are going to love it. So I really want you to think about pre ordering by your favorite authors, because it is a great way to make sure that they get lots of love and support. And if you've loved Christie and Mary case books in the past, or even if you just love this show and you want to show your support for two of the people who go all out every single week to make this great experience, do consider pre ordering. Of course they're available wherever books are sold old but if you want a hand signed first edition of both books with a little free gift, actually it's kind of a big free gift, but be honest, you can order the spring box from our friends at independent book store Oxford Exchange. You'll receive a beautiful delivery of both books, each of them autographed by these two superstars, as soon as the released. And if you haven't read Christen's or my two thousand and twenty one books, Surviving Savannah and the forest of banishing stars, there will be in paperback this spring. And we have another exciting and noun tonight is just like wall the wall. I know, it's just boom boom boom. We have another exciting announcement for you tonight. We're delighted to announce a copy with friends. Three month promotion with our friend and partner, Charleston Coffee Roasters. What goes better than coffee and a great book? How about friends to chat with over a cup of Joe about the books she love. We call that a match maide in heaven shine. Why he was put the graphic over my face. Oh thanks, yeah, put it over their faces. Just celebrate this fine new information. We have a little surprise for you tonight. We'd love to welcome not only Lowell Gross, the president of Charleston Coffee Roasters, but also another friend of Charleston Coffee Rosters, our friends and friends and fiction bound or emeritus and Coffee Aficionatto, Mary Alice. monrow shine, can you bring Lowell and Mary Alice on please? Hi, back, see, here we go, here love, are so happy, beautiful months. Yeah, yeah, so we're so happy to see y'all. Mary Alice, it's so good to see you back in the square and now it's fun. It's fun and low it''s so nice to be you. So, Lowell, we're so...

...glad to be partnering with Charleston Coffee Roasters again. Can you tell us a bit about your company? Certainly I'm very happy and we're very excited to be partnering with you. Charleston Coffee Roasters was founded on producing the best tasting coffee that the consumers desires and two main principles kind of guiding our company. Making sure that we're purchasing coffee correctly from farmers who are taking care of their environment, their ecology and their workers and using sustainable coffee practices, and we're very proud of why we've gotten up to about ninety nine percent of our coffee is all organic. Oh, that's amazing. Yeah, we're very excited about that. And the second print made principle with our company is making sure we're giving back to our community being a socially responsible corporate citizen, and one of our biggest partnerships along the years we've been involved with obvious sue had married Alice with the seat turtles and shoe let us can got the connection with the aquarium and what a great organization, everything they do on the environmental side, the animals and the people that work there, and we're very excited now to announce that will be the lead sponsor of their nutritional care program at the South Carolina quarium. That's amazing. That's really excited about that. Okay, Mary Alice, we know you work with Charleston Coffee Roasters in the past. Would you tell us a little bit about that partnership and what you love about them? Well, the I've been a turtle lady for a long time and law has. I got to know him because he always supported the turtle teas we have with his coffee, and so then the pstones distance was when he went worked together for the Beach House blend, which really rock. I got to help create this blend and it's really, really delicious if you like full bodied coffee. But all the blends at Charleston Coffee roasters are so delicious and, as Patti said, I am who said a calf cop was it you, Christie? I'm a conf you know, I love coffee and I drink a lot. So, and this is this Mug Cube, by the way, this Turtle Law has been a fixture in Charleston, a community supporter, not aquarium but for the sea turtles, which explains the logo. That is a Cocke with the turtle. Yeah, so how can we not love him? He's with friends and fiction now. Yeah, so exciting. Yeah, no, it's the only coffee that we drink. I mean I love your coffee, but my husband was probably like the most excited of all of us about this promotion, but because he loves your coffee, loves it. So he was really, really excited because blend is the best. I've just in it. It's stillttle. Get Out of the park. It was a great contribution with Mary Ellis and bringing this all together and she's gave us all her important we put it together and boom, this just just it hit it and it's becoming very, very popular. I think it's it's one of our top sellers on our website. Oh my gosh, I'm not surprised at all. It is a part of this promotion. We're going to have some fun giveaways here on the friends and fiction page. Plus, Charleston Coffee Riisters will be off offering book and coffee bundles featuring the books of the friends and fiction authors, plus a special twenty percent off come good for the next three months, on all bagged coffee on their website. Well, can you tell us a little bit about that? Yes, we're again very excited for this partnership. We want to bring everybody in have a chance to purchase our coffees at a great discount and kind of supporting, and we love supporting, all the independent book stores. We work with Mary Elis Monroe, with boxton books and Charleston and doing that. So now kind of bringing in allowing your community to be able to purchase these organic coffees at a great price. And, as you were saying before, we cover the Gammat as far as taste profile. So we developed the intrinsic flavor of the being and bring that out. And couple I'm currently enjoying is our breakfast plan and our single origin Hundurn, on the lighter side, really kind of bright citusly light, sweet and taste, and then on the darker roast we have at the Beach House blend is always one of our favorite. My favorite too. It's just rich, full taste and it's about a great taste and coffee. I think we can all raise a Mug of Charleston commy rose it to that. And before we go, Mary Alice, can you quickly tell us what you have coming up in the next couple of months? Thank you, Kristen. Yes, it's some right here your go. We announced my first middle great book, the Islanders, and so I'm really excited to have the second the second book, and this it's a series and...

...it's called search for treasure and it's coming out in June. We're really excited. Hopefully I'll see you here then. And no new adult book this year. Paperback of summer blost and found. So a little bit more quiet for me. I love this middle break. I tell you, talk talking to those kids is wonderful and I am amazed how many adults are loving the books. So it's been a real adventure. Thank you said, but we'll look forward to celebrating with you in a couple of months when those books are a little bit closer. So, Lowell, we're happy to have you here to celebrate tonight. We're excited about this great partnership. And now, thanks for being here. Is Wonderful to see you both. It was a lot of pleasure. Oh, so gay by y'all. So good. That's fun. Yeah, all right, everyone out there, let's show our new partner the power of the friends and fiction community. Not only do we hope he used the discount code coffee with friends on the Charleston Coffee roasters website to get twenty percent off of all bagged coffee, but you. We also hope that all of you out there will follow Charleston Coffee roasters on facebook and instagram. That was a lot of fun, but I am still breathless from finishing the invisible life of Addy Labrie last night. I don't know why I didn't read it sooner. I now I wish I had. A was absolutely incredible. So I could not wait a second more before we bring on our guest for the evening. Me Neither. Let's do it. Victoria the Schwab is the Number One New York Times best selling author of more than twenty books, including the acclaimed shades of magic series, the villains series, the Cassidy Blake series and the international best seller the invisible life of addy larue. Victoria's work has received critical acclaim has been translated into over two dozen and for those of us who don't do math, that's more than twenty four, and has been options for television and boom for television and film. First Kale A, why, a vampire series based on Victoria's short story of the same name, is currently in the works at Netflix with none other than Emma Roberts bellatris productions. Producing. That's awesome. Victoria attended Washington University in St Louis and lived for a while in Nashville before packing up and getting out of town, the town, to Europe. And she's not haunting pair of streets or trudging up English hillsides. Victoria lives in Edimurrow, Scotland. Did you see how I said that right? I'm in pressed. And she is usually took in the corner of a coffee shop dreaming up monsters. And we're hoping she's gonna show her kittens on screen tonight. Who So cute? Shun? Can You bring Victoria on please? Hi, one of the KITTENS has just settled down next to me. So swearious. It's precarious, but we believe that those kittens were missed having earlier. So bad. There's so bad. But Hi, thank you so much for having me. Oh, we are absolutely thrilled to have you here. So gallant comes out next week. Can you start off to night? It's such a beautiful, beautiful, gorgeous know we were all just saying, how about beautifully packaged it is. You start us off tonight by telling us, Oh my Gosh, look at that, so and papers look at figure out how to pitch it. Yeah, that is amazing. Could you start off by telling us a little bit about it tonight? Of course. Gallant is the story of Olivia Pryor, a girl who has spent the vast majority of her life in Maryland's home for independent girls and orphanage and she knows nothing of her family except that she has a journal from her mother that seems to devolve into madness. But at the back of the Journal is a letter that looks lucid, and at the end of the letter to Olivia are three warnings. One that the shadows are not real, the second is that the dreams, the dreams, will not hurt her, and the third is that she will be safe so long as she stays away from gallant. And she has no idea what melant is what it refers to, until she receives a letter from an uncle she's never met inviting her to come home to the family estate gallant. And when she gets there, she's never no uncle. She discovers a house that is practically abandoned, a garden being strangled by strange dead weeds and a garden wall at the back of the estate with a locked door that seems to leave nowhere. Oh my gosh, see, there's there's really nothing...

...intriguing about this at all. IV It as the secret garden meets Crimson Peak. I was gonna say there's something a little super garden five and there. That's all. Yeah, that's Galt. Oh, like it is. Sounds amazing. Well, you have crafted an incredible career of Victoria, ranging from middle grade to young adult to adult fiction. The immissible life of Addy Larue, which is geared toward adults, has been absolutely everywhere, to put it in mildly, and we'll be talking about that book in just a minute. You've written books like city of ghosts and tunnel of bones for middle grade readers and books like the monsters, the verity and the archive series for young adults. So you've really done it all. Can you talk a little bit about straddling these different genres and how you've managed to do it so successfully? Oh Yeah, thank you. Um, yeah, I don't know. I certainly didn't start out successful. I want to like be very, very clear about that. In fact, like the first three, two, four books of my career, I thought was going to be it. Like they they first book came out and nobody read it and it went out of print eighteen months after and my second book came out and nobody read it, and my third book came out, and you can see a pattern happening here. And about three books and I thought, Oh, I was twenty five, so I started very young, like you just want to like get out of the way. There's twenty five, and I kind of know I was being pulled by my publisher at the time like there's nothing here, like you're it's not going to work. And so I sat down and decided that if my career was going to end that quickly, that it was going to end on my terms and I was going to write a book that I didn't care if anyone else liked. I was going to write it entirely for myself. It was, and it's a you know, a realization we should make at the beginning of our career, but we don't always. There's always an awareness of audience, but I just thought, well, if it's going to be an audience of one, it's going to be an audience of me. And I sat down at very strange novel called vicious, which is about super villains. It is essentially like like the secret history with Super Villains. It's very, very dark and very weird and I thought nobody will read it, but at least I will be satisfied. And people wrote it, more people than had read two, one, two and three. And I started from that point on. No matter what I wrote, no matter what age I wrote for, I just instead of thinking about audience, instead of thinking about anyone else, I just looked at an an age of myself. So when I write Middle Grade, I'm writing for eleven year old me, I don't know what else was, and when I'm writing Whya, I'm writing for seventeen year old me, and when I'm writing adult, I'm writing for whatever age I am at the time. I sat down and finally started writing Addi Larue when I was thirty, and I think you can tell it because so much of the identity in that book is that Arbitrary Line of adulthood that's suddenly hold by the world that you should know what you're doing. And so I think that the only thing my books really having common is that they're written for a version of myself. I love it how it's so great. I'm scribbling down notes, as she said. I wrote nated vibes well, and you have described gallant as your first all ages read, which I love for so many reasons. Like just I think we all have this idea of the court it would be like to have like multiple generations of people reading our book at the same time, where like families really having a story that like they can all enjoy together. And this is absolutely brilliantinmfascinating to all of us because, you know, I'm publishing. They usually kind of make you choose, like you have to sort of be in this little box. So can you tell us a little bit about like what makes us in all ages read and how have you accomplished this amazing book that will appeal equally to young and adult readers? I'm laughing because it's like it's like an all ages read is the spin that you give to it doesn't sit anywhere cleanly in the books. Like I didn't want to the story I wanted to tell. You know again talking about that kind of the deviation your mind between writer, you and author, you, and the writer you has the story you want to tell, in the author you understands the story to want to help somewhere, and I just I kept hitting those divides in the story and seeing what I would need to do to make it fit cleanly. But those weren't the things I wanted to do for the story, and so what I ended up with was a story that I think in some ways has middle grade qualities, because the conflict, the crux of it, is one of interiority, of internal identity. And then there are obviously she's a teenager, so who that makes you think? You want to place it in Wya, but there's no romantic element. It really is a story of found family and and then there's very adult elements to it. It's a death tale, it's a story about the underworld and about loss and grief, and so I'm very, very fortunate. This is not a book I think I would have been able to write and publish earlier on in my career. I think...

...there was an extreme luxury of coming on the success at Addie Larue yea and of being able to say to my publisher early on I'm not sure where this book is going to sit on shelves, and having the publishers say, why don't you just write the story you want to write and we'll figure out how to market it. It's amazing. That is a great thing to hear. It's a first, let me tell you. It's a form for everything I like. I think one of the things that made my career really difficult early on is because I don't tend to fit cleanly into categories and I it wasn't seen as a strength, like I want to be really explicit with that. It was seen as a as a detriment. It was I was told over and over and over again I wasn't commercial enough, I wasn't mainstream enough, that it would be difficult to sell my books, that would acquire a lot of handselling, and it did. An independent booksellers hand sold it, the onesters hand sold it and people had a connection to the story. But even now I'm told, you know, Addie has spent like forty something weeks on New York Times list and I'm still toed like, Oh, you don't really write easily marketable bow. We're sorry about that. Feel like that one was marketed. Okay, yeah, but everybody can help you with that. Yeah, ru I was convinced with the nail in the coffin of my career because it was a complete divergence from everything I had written before. And like I was, I have a science fiction and fantasy publisher. I was like, I don't even know if they know how to market. I mean tour obviously proved that they did, but I mean I think there's a it's like in retrospect it we call it a reward and before it happens we call it a risk. So I think that it's true lentury of so I got to write that down again. You can come back and watch it. Mary pay pregeous, though, because I you know, I think its writers were told throughout our careers you have to follows. You know, yes, be creative, but be creative within the constraints we've given you. And you just you just followed you, you did you, and I think that's incredible and I mean look more, but you have to stop for it. I will say I've been I think you know, we have positive reinforcement and and I think that the reinforcement that I felt over the years has outweighed the risk in that I've noticed, because I write across an age spectrum for where things sit on a shelf. Over the years I would have a reader come up to me in the vent and the reader would not match the age of the book at all. I would have you know a grandparent come up to me with one of my middle grade books. I'll never forget. I had a ten year old boy come up to me with vicious, which is this super villain seior history, and I was like what are you doing with this? Gladdy likes a book like so I I like writing stories that, to your point earlier, can just appeal to intergenerational reading so that parents can read them with their children's family can read it, friends can read it, and I think I always talk about books like Jigsaw Puzzles like they should have a lower age limit, advisory, but no upper age limit, and I think plus or at a ten plus on a puzzle or a game. I think. I think that we do such a disservice when we suggest that there's a time we age out of a specific reading category, because I think we discover and rediscover new things about a book when we come back to it at different ages. And I agree with that. Yeah, when you were just talking about writing for yourself, I was thinking about the section and Stephen King has a book on writing. It's called on writing and it's such an extraordinary book. But he talks him there about choosing your ideal reader and then writing to that ideal reader, and for him it's his wife Tabitha. But I love the idea that the ideal reader is that person in us. Yeah, so that's extraordinary. But I want to talk a little bit about the invisible life of Addi Luveru so is. Slate magazine called the book epic yet intimate, sweeping but not sprawling, which I think is such a great description. It's truly astonishing the way you handle this scope thousands of years. Can you talk to us about the way you actually came up with the idea for this tale? I think you told US earlier before we were on air. It took you how long? Ten years. Wow. So tell us about coming up with it and dealing with this complex tail. I mean I think it was a lesson impatience. I as I mean we talked. I think there's this urge, when you have an idea for a story, to start writing that story immediately and have a fairly long, steep time with my story. So I always use like the metaphor of a six burner stove. So if my mind is a six burner stove, I have pots on all of the stoves. They're not all up on high heat. Most of them, like most of them, are on low heat and simmering for a long time. Because of that, when I do start writing a novel, I don't abandon it. I don't have any trunked novels because by the time I sit down to write the novel it's...

...like steeped. I know what it's going to be, but with adding. I got the first seeds of the idea when I was twenty three and I the book came out when I was thirty three and and it truly was the first couple of years I didn't have all the ingredients for my meal, and then after that I had the ingredients and I became terrified of writing it because, you know, you'll understand about me very quickly. I love metaphors and I always say that like an idea when it's in your head is like this beautiful glass orb filled with light. It's perfect, it's flawless because you haven't made it. And then the act of writing the idea down into a first draft is the act of smashing that glass orb against and the act of vising is like desperately trying to reassemble broken glass or to try and make it look that way again, like like yourself. But I became so enamored with the glass ORB in my mind I didn't want to write it down because I knew something would be lost. There's always something less in physics. It's the difference between potential and kinetic energy. Like you're going to lose something and I was scared. I was just like desperately afraid. And then when I was twenty, nine, thirty years old, so like seven years into it, for that I realized, Oh, I'M gonna die without writing this book, like that's what's going to happen. is like it's going to be the book of mine. I had nineteen other books published in that time, so it wasn't like I was never going to be published, but it was going to be the book that I let die for want of perfection. And then I really like, oh well, that's no good. I can either now decide to let the story live only in my mind and be perfect there, or I can embrace the fact that all writing is an act of imperfection and I can get it out. And sorry, all writing is an act of imperfection. Yeah, I'm having a therapy session. Wow, the wrong person is sitting on the couch. She's sitting on the couch giving welcome. Welcome, right, welcome to writer therapy. New Name of our show says the doctor is in. You know, like you know that so intimately that it's this you at the first person. You know, the first way you have to get out of is your own. You have to like find a way that comes to terms with the fact that you're going to ruin something by making it and like I love a comment, but yeah, and it's was hard, but I just realized at some point like I needed it, I needed it to exist so that I could let go of it. And the beautiful thing that happens, you know, when you finished writing a book, is that you've been carrying all of that weight yourself and then when you finish it, you get to put it down and and it becomes other people's right, like you get to Hant the weight off in the weight suddenly gets like held up by however many hands read the book, and so like, I just I just really needed to get to that point where somebody else could hold on to Addie's story for me. Yeah, yeah, absolutely, you know, just real quick Victoria for people who haven't read it. Tell us very briefly about it. We actually have of you are out there, Elizabeth Johnson Howard saying. What should readers know about your Addie Larue book who haven't read it yet or are unsure about it being for them? How would you hand sell it like a bookseller? So the invisible life of Ade larue is the story of a young woman in eighteen century France who is afraid that she's going to be born and buried in the same ten meter plot she's just has. She has no no future, no adventure, no anything, and so she ends up making a deal with the devil to live forever. And the devil doesn't want to do the deal because he doesn't get her soul until the deal's done. If she lives forever, the deal's not done, and so she says to him in a moment of weakness, you can have my soul when I don't want it anymore, and sensing an opportunity, the devil grants her her request to live forever and to get his soul, he curses her to be forgotten by everyone she needs. So the story is set over three hundred years, as Addie tries to leave a mark on a world that can't remember her, and it's set over one year in New York City, when she meets a young man who does remember her. Isn't it such as just a brilliant concepts what all, my Gosh, I just the idea of the book is so smart, but then your execution, Victoria, is freaking brilliant, like brilliant. You knew it, though, like you knew this was the once in a lifetime book. I knew it was like of all my works, which sounds so narcissistic, and that's no, no, it does not. I think we all have that instant. I mean I think sometimes it's dead wrong, like not enough, name I, and this is the book that's going to...

...ruin my career. Why? I mean there, but I didn't know's on our susistic. It's just that I felt like it had to be important because it didn't let go after ten years. You know, it's not lasted, and I knew that. I wanted this book like to be the thing that outlived me, which is such a weird way to put it, but I just was like I knew it as I was writing it and that I knew it when it was done, and the reason I knew it. The only way I can describe it as going back to that glass orb. It's the closest I've ever come to putting the glass or back together, like into this day, almost identical to the thing that existed in my mind. Now it didn't come out that way in the first draft. The revision was the act of making it back, but by the time it hit shelves it is exactly what was in my head. That's amazing. Yeah, what that deeling is like. And I've written books, but I will tell you the success is for Ruinaus's failure in that way, because everything like gallant then became the book I wrote after Addie and like then become this thing where you're like trying to chase smoke. You're trying to figure out if you'll ever feel that way again, like it's just you almost have to embrace that. That is didn't the strangeness not the Norm of a writing career. I don't think I'll ever capture that again. I don't know. I was gonna say it sounds like a captured it. Yeah, I just didn't talk. Yeah, exactly. See, we have faith in you. Thank you all right. Yeah, I you know, you wrote a beautiful essay a year and a half ago for Oprah daily about coming out and in it you talked about writing stories with outsiders at their centers who are at odds with their world, and I think that's so powerful, not just because it could seems to come so naturally from your own lived experience, but also because it's so universal. I think all of us, for different reasons, at different times in our lives, I felt that way. I think that's especially true for those of us who lose themselves and find themselves and books, and I wonder if that that is in a particularly common experience in young people, in your Ya audience and in your Middle Grade Audience, and I wish you'd talk a little bit about why you think that central theme of person at odds with their world who decides to escape or change is so powerful and storytelling and how it relates to the arc of your writing career. Yeah, it's a long question. I know. I got it. I like it, I love it. No, I think it is. I think about this a lot because so I started. I wrote my first published novel when I was twenty two and I came out when I was twenty eight and I wasn't like I was in the closet a lot of that time to myself as well. So a lot of the time I was writing about outsiders. I didn't realize what a Standin that was. I didn't really writing about outsiders because that sense of otherness, that umbrella of otherness, encompasses so much and I think there's a reason. I mean there are several reasons. I think it speaks to young readers especially. I think we all feel like outsiders. Yeah, there are very few exceptions to that. See, it kind of goes part and parcel with why I write a lot about anti heroes and villains and like, and I think it's because I don't think when we read a character we relate to their strengths. I think we relate to their failings. I don't think we look at a character, a hero, and they're being a Badass and we're like, I'm a Badass and they're a Badass. Look at this now. We like relate to a character who's struggling. Yeah, you see the flaws and the blaws become the mirror element, and I think the same thing happens with outside with feeling like you don't fit into your world, because outsiders really come into two forms in fiction. It's like people who are physically from another place and people who were born insiders to a place and feel outside. Yeah, and I think I like writing both of them because I think both of them are really valid. I think sometimes it really telling about the reader which one they see themselves. Yeah, you know, there's a go ahead on that. Not at all. It just it brings to mind there's a movement in the states, and I don't know if you keep up with it in some states, with politicians cowing schools. You can't, you can't have curriculum for gay kids, Lesbian Kids, trans kids, buy kids and putting putting the stamp of censorship on that. I wonder if that's something that you thought of. Oh, of course, I mean, I I can say it is like there are very f few...

...times I going to say thank God for the Internet, but thank God for the Internet because, like I'm like the the the wealth of technology that that many, not all, but many youth especially have access to at least allows them to find their own path and find their own tribe and see themselves in a way that they wouldn't be able to twenty years ago. So that's like one of my only gratitude points. I think it's heinous. I I remember one of the first things that happened to me publishing didn't actually happen in the United States. I found out that my one of my fantasy series, which has a queer romance in it, was censored in Russia and I didn't find out. Publisher didn't tell me. I found out because I had a reader who read in both languages and did a sidebysite comparison and the publisher had gone through and fist an entire plot line. Tell you, so they published you without telling you. Yeah, so, I mean it became like a big thing where like we to cancel the contracts because they were in breach. But, like, I just remember it was really the first instance that I had intimately with that kind of thing and that erasure, and I must come out publicly. It was like literally within six months of that and I'd really struggle for a long time about whether I wanted to come out publicly and since then I'm very grateful because I think having the luxury of platform and understanding that, like, I come from a place of such insulation and safety. You know, there's so I'm in so little danger compared to so many of my readers that it's the least I can do to show something like that, even of a future like I swear like I'm pretty successful, but it's devastating. But, like I say, I'm very, very, very glad for the Internet because I do think that at least there's an accessibility where people can try and circumnavigate a lot of these horrific gate people situations. Yeah, I feel for kids who live in rural areas, yes, where the libraries have taken books out of circulation and and you know there are school systems that have clubs for kids and that's being squashed and I think about what could have happened to you if you had lived in that experience at as a kid. Oh, yeah, I mean it's it's just I think it's one of the reasons that I and a lot of authors I know try to be as accessible as possible online. Often that accessibility is really difficult because it's not great, for it conflates this idea of the author in the human and it erases the human. So on the dehumanizing element. But I think one of the reasons that a lot of authors, especially those of us who do right for children and teens, try to persist with that accessibility is to like help make sure that there's visibility for for those who do need to see themselves and who do need to understand that they have advocates and that they're you know, that, that there's a place for them. Yeah, yeah, what an incredible thing to do with your gift. I mean you've, you know, you've written yourself this life and you're using what you've built to reach out and help other people, but not just people who you know might have been in the same a similar position to you, but everybody. I mean I think we all felt touchstones and things that helped us in in your book. I know I did. I know I felt very connected to adding l ruin. It made me ask a lot of questions of myself about about fate and chance and decisions and a life well lived, and I just think it's a beautiful thing to do, when you have a platform like that, to use it for good, to use your powers for good, not even a little bit like like the Broccoli in the Mac and cheese, like I'm like trying to like punique everything. Like I'm like yeah, like I'm like a mainstream fantasy author. Oh, there's like a gay romance, just gonna put it in there, like, you know, because I it. The fact is, like I want to normalize as much of what has been othered as possible, and the way that you do that, unfortunately, is through success. And the only way to do it is through like to become successful enough that people that those people in publishing will take risks and because they want to see those risks as a loss, they'll see those risks as an opportunity. Or that be like if I become a reference point where they say, where we can take this risk because it worked for v then suddenly, like somebody gets a chance taken on a book that or a representation, a minority or marginaling person gets a much bigger opportunity, because at the end of the day, publishing is about money and it sucks. But like if they have that's true. Yeah, like there are reference points. They have to feel like they are comp titles that are successful enough that then so I feel like the more successful I get, the bolder get. Something like the all ages read something like Queer existence, just taking up space in a narrative and not having identity. have to be like a...

...plot point, not I would in a narrative just as a plot point. I try to do these things, the more successful, I guess, so that I can then become a comp title. So yeah, it works well. I think it's interesting to that you your work showed you. Right, you're saying like it was subconsciously you didn't even know and your work showed you, because I think our work, like our subconscious comes through our work to show US things about ourselves and we're like wait, what? Well, populary, doesn't it like? The thing that you think about reading stories is they're not just transportive, but they become mirrors as well. As Doris right, they reflect something back and suddenly we see ourselves in a way that we didn't before. They can help create the vocabulary that we need in our own life. Yep, you're absolutely right. All right, Victoria, we have a ton of questions coming in for you and we're going to grab a few in a second, but I wanted to read a comment first. Marilyn L will ours says, Victoria, I love how your face lights up as you talked about your books. Truly inspiring and I know we're all talking or thinking the same thing and I wanted to ask a quick question from Linda Jacobs, watching a youtube who wants to know. Is Gallant to standalone or part of a series standalone novel? I have both also. It's always good to ask. Thank you for asking, but no, it is a scandalone novel. It is just a little capsul. It's ideally read in a single day or a single sitting, but hopefully the kind of story that you walk away from afterwards and then it follows you. That is awesome. All right, Patty. Do you want to pull a live question for us? Yes, Elizabeth Johnson Howard asks, and I I'm picking this for very selfish reasons. I want to know how did you decide to make Scotland your home and what advice would you share about moving and living internationally in that way? So you better I so I'm fortunate. I'm a I'm a dual citizen, so my mom is English and my grandparents were both Scottish, which easier. But what I will say is that several years ago I realized I was spending a lot of my career on the road, which is an incredible luxury, like I'm very grateful to be able to do that as part of my job. But that meant that for me, vacation was coming home, and so I stopped and I started to really ask myself what did I want that to feel like? What did I want my home to be, since it was going to need to be this place where I feel creatively recharged, where I'm excited. When I'm home I'm really writing. It's very difficult for me to write on the road, but when I'm home I disappear into my work, and so I needed a place that was going to recharge my batteries. And the very first time I've always had wander lust. I've wing tattoos behind both ankles and and the very first time I set foot in Edinburgh off the train, it just felt like all of the silts inside me settled to the floor. I because I love that too, you know. So I felt like I tried to recapture that and then every time I came back it just got stronger and stronger and stronger, and so now this is where this is where I live. It's amazing. Oh Man. Yeah, Mary Kay, would you like to ask a question? Yeah, and speaking of tattoos, JANA navarrow wants to know what's the Tattoo on your arm? Okay, well, I have. First all, I have a key, and this is actually a real key, but it's so that all the doors in life will open for me. Yea, I have a magpie and a crow, and this is because there are two members of the corvid family, but they're really opposite connotation. So if you think about the magpie, it's kind of flighty and it likes to collect things, very shiny things, whereas the crow has a long memory and is very cunning, and I feel like these are the two aspects of my personality. There of a whole. They're of a family, but they're definitely kind of have different energies to them. That's awesome. That's awesome. Christie, do you want to pull a question? Oh yeah, Melissa Osborne says. I loved the book so much I did not want it to end. How did you decide on the time period and the research? Great Question. Yes, hi, Thomas, sorry, the kit in this back. No, no, don't settle me right now. I am for addy. I am going to assume, since this is the years and the research. Yeah, guess I am. I was so arbitrates, one of those like writerly things right. I needed it to be long enough that it could it could really separate itself into arcs. She really has three eras, and so these three hundred years provide three one hundred year eras where she really kind of goes through different stages of her own identity and development, kind of like the five stages of grief, but shoved into three hundred years. And I felt like more than three hundred years. You start, it starts to lose its shape, like time starts to lose meaning. The other thing that was really tricky with addeus is essentially it's a Faustian bar in tail, but it's told through a...

...female Lens, which is really important because my whole issue with Bowski and bargain tails, whether their vampire tales or actual deals with the devil, is like the men in these stories, they lay like live forever, they like eat everything there is to eat, they see everything there is to see, they screw everyone there is, just grew and then they get bored. My whole face thiss was like a woman would never get moved through the world that freely because of like the physicality of her body in time and in history, but I also needed it to be a period of time that Addie could retain her hope, because the whole thing that makes addie the real powerful character, I think, is that she is driven by stubborn joy and like a roomless hope and optimism, and I think that three hundred years was the perfect almost tension point for the fatigue that she is just starting to feel in two thousand and fourteen, where it's really starting to almost calcify inside of her. Yes, absolutely, all right, Victoria, we love a good writing tip on this show. We love hearing the different advice and I feel like, I think all of us feel like we could sit here and talk to you all night, but we're just asking for one writing tip. I wish you could give us five hundred because I feel like it would just stamp the course of the rest of my career. Wait, would you mind sharing a writing tip with US tonight? So, and this is going to be a contentious tip, because all writing processes are different, but what I will say is that what I have found that helps for me is that I come up with the ending first, and the reason I do this is because, to me, the ending is the culmination of everything that you're working towards, the tastelift in your mouth at the end of the meal. But I also it's I do it for multiple reasons. One is because I find writing books to be extraordinarily difficult and I am very likely to quit if I don't have an end that I'm working toward. I need to have something insight, because it takes a desert and it makes it a football field. Right like I need to know that there's a fine right amount of distance that I'm traveling. So on bad days I won't quit because I know the end is right there on. But I'm I'm driven toward that end and if I get stuck, I know will okay. I'm here in the ends, here. So what's something that needs to happen between? I know that I won't get lost. So I find for especially for those struggling with a first draft, have an ending that excites you. Above it, it's great advice, advice. And do you and do you plotted out really dumb? Do you plot it out pretty in pretty much detail? I do because my anxiety would like not allow it otherwise. Like some people, they I think there's this idea that if you're an outliner you lack the discovery process. But for me the discovery processes in the outlining, not in the drafting, and I find that having a plan like, to use another metaphor, it's like I'm not planning the road on which I'm walking, but I'm planning the terrain so that I don't walk off a cliff. Like I just need I need a shape, or else I start to get very anxious that I don't have enough story or that I'm not moving the right direct and so for me the outlining is like of is a creative engine, not a detriment. Love it, okay, all right now. So we also usually ask authors to give us a book suggestion. We'd like that too, but we love that question. The New York Times Book Review Asks Authors What Book, Why might we be surprised to find in your library or on your nightstand? WHOO, that's such a good question. Um, I have a lot of very weird books on my shelves. I'm like, I think we'd be surprised. They don't think anything would surprise anyone who has read any of my works, like a reception on symbology. No, there's no surprise. Nothing is surprised, but nothing is super okay, I have a I play violin. This is I have violin music currently propped up on my book shelf. I started violin when I was thirty two. Oh, guess wanted to do it. I wanted it growing up and I was told again and again like well, now it's too late, right, like you're tool to start such a difficult instrument. And so when I turned thirty two, I started playing violin and I am terrible and I love being terrible because it is not my job and so I'm allowed to be terrible. And when writing became my occupation, this thing that I loved, suddenly how to like quantifiable measurement to it a quality as well, and so being allowed to be terrible at something is so free. That's amazing. I love that. All right, Victoria, if you would not mind sticking around for just a few more minutes, we have one additional question for you, but we are also cognizant of the fact you were coming to us tonight from Scotland and it is almost one o'clock in the morning there and you are such a rock star for being up with us all. So we have a fee of a few announcements, but...

...they we're going to bring you back in for one question. We will try to talk fast. This week on our friends to fiction block caps. This week on our friends and fiction writers block podcast, our friend Ron Block interviews Jennifer Smith and Diana Ross Dad about entering adulthood, meaning they did not write their debuts until well into adulthead adulthood. Oh my gosh. And on the last episode, the one that comes out tomorrow, Ron and I talk to audio file editor Robin and Fiona Hardingham in an episode titled Are you listening? Fiona Hardingham is a audiobook narrator and Robin is the editor of audio file magazine. So remember that a new original episode drops each and every Friday. And if you want to make sure you never miss a podcast episode, subscribe. Wherever you get your podcast and why you're in a subscribing mood, we'd love it if you'd sign up for our newsletter and our youtube channel so you never miss a thing. You can also find selected back episodes of friends and fiction on the new online platform lowco plus. And if you are not hanging out with us yet and the friends and fiction official book club, open a new tab on your computer right now. Or you've men and go follow us, but don't turn this tab off for heaven's sake. Is Round by Lisa Harrison and Brenda Gardener is now more than elevenzero strong. Join them on their facebook page. On March twenty one for they will be discussing the soul mate equation with Christina Lauren, and right now they're running it giveaway on the book club's facebook page. You can win a gift pad from our new partner, Charleston Coffee risters and our by Tuesday and we'll reveal the winner live on next week's show. And if you want to keep track of what you think the soul mate equation and all of what you think of the soul mate equation and all the other great books you're reading. As you may know, we're in months two of our friends and fiction reading challenge. We encourage you to pick up this friends and fiction reading journal from our partners at Oxford Exchange. It has quotes from all of us throughout and lots of great prompts to help you reflect on the books you've read this month. We're encouraging to read a memoir or non fiction as part of the challenge and the journals are great place to put it all down, and it's the first time I've ever journal book, so it's been a new, great experience for me and Patty to you have a little something you want to talk to us about. Okay, Victoria, I'm going to make this really fast because I'm thinking about you at one am in Edinburgh and you're ready to go on book tour, aren't you? You're getting ready to hit the road. Well, at the Havannah Book Festival. I told you all that I had a big announcement this week, so here I am. I am so excited to finally, after eighteen months of writing a book in quietly, I mean these ladies knew, but I have been working on a book called the River Child. And here's what happened. While I was researching once upon a wardrobe, I was struck by a tidbit of one thousand nine hundred and thirty nine British history, where there was an operation called Operation Pied Piper, where children from the cities were sent away away from their families to protect them from bombings. So with luggage tags around their necks, gas masks dangling from their knapsacks, and a stamped address note for their parents when they found out where they might end up. These children were bundled onto trains and ships and sent off away from their parents to on loan a cations. So I imagined a pair of sisters, a mystery, a fairy tale, a rare book shop in London and, of course, a river, always a river and a missing child. And next year you can read about them, next summer of two thousand and twenty three, and I'm thrilled to join in the Atria books family and we'll be talking about it more as the ments go by. I'm so excited. gratulation. Thank you. I'm so excited. I'm still kind of grinning about the whole thing, as you should be. I'd still remember when you told me it was the last time we were all in tie you together, and I wasn't your started. What do you think about this idea? And it was just so magic, so excited, heartily magic. So we cannot wait for all of you out there and make sure to join us for our next episode of friends in fiction next week, next Wednesday, right here at seven pm are we will welcome calling hooper. Then on March night will hostly Sabar and Erica robe up and Rachel McMillan will join us for the after show. You're ever wondering about our schedule, it's always on our friends and fiction website and on the header graphic on our facebook page. And now back to Victoria. One question we always like to ask. What were the values around reading and writing when you were growing up? Oh my goodness, Um, I mean it was welcomed. It was...

...welcome, but I would be lying if I said I was one of those children that grew up tucked into a library nook. I until I was sixteen I thought I was going to play in the World Cup, like I was an athlete. I was very, very much like outside. I really struggled to find my stride and reading, but I was intoxicated by the power of words. And so, interestingly, all through high school I never really touched novels. It was always poetry. WHO's holding fiction? It was always something brief and focused and transportative, and so it wasn't really until I got to college that I almost kind of sank into and started to luxuriate in longer fiction. But I mean, it was welcomed, but I think the reason I was attracted too much to poetry, as my parents read to me before bed, and they would always read like she'll Silverstein and like small, very, very like them, always poems, always like small, little snippets of story, and I found that to be incredibly soothing. That's awesome. Well, Victoria, what an absolute pleasure to have you with US tonight. We are so grateful for you being here, especially given a time difference, and we're sorry to have kept you up to one in the morning, but man, we love talk. What don't you know? To spend the evening? I could, and what a night. Thank you. Can. Are you coming, Victoria? Are you come into the states for the gallant book tour? I am, I am. Well, maybe you'll go here. Maybe you'll go on our friends and fiction page and tell folks where you're going to be. Rely, I would love to. Maybe you will track you down, like in a good way like that, not all such a I would love that. Thank you well, Victoria. Thank you so much for being with US tonight. We loved you and we wish you a great night. Thank you. Thank you, and Toria. All right, now, to all of you out there, make sure to stay for our aftershow, as Gr mcallister, who might also know as career mcallister, will be joining us. And don't forget that you can find all of our back episodes on Youtube. We are live there every week, just like we are on a Dacebook, and if you subscribe you will never miss a thing. FLESHT'll have access to special short clips if I ever get my act together and start pulling them again. So be sure to come back next week, same time, same place, as we welcome colleen mover and we will see you in the aftershow. Wow, wow, am I the only one who feels like I have to go and start writing my next novel right now, like with all those? She was incredible. I loved her Yep, and you know, it was so interesting, like she was able to put into words. I think we all have that thing where the beginning stages we like, we feel that book like we can. We can, like see the whole event in our mind, but so often it's so difficult to get it to that like lofty vision. Was Choose. Amazing, phansomazing, lot of pool quotes, man, a lot of bag I know, I gosh, I feel like you could make a whole calendar of like inspirational quotes for writer space and when it's not in anywhere, we have someone from really good ring down. That's all right, but I think that the inspiration of the evening is not even close to being over. Yeah, we have another amazing author waiting backstage and we would love to tell you about her. Oh that's me. Do you have a callister who also writes best selling historical fiction under the name Grahamycallister is the author of the five Queendom series and a regular contributor to write or unbossed in Chicago Review of books. Her novels have been named Indie, next library reads and Amazon Best Book of the month picks, and they have been optioned for film and Television. Her epic fantasy debut and the first novel in the fine in the five queensdom series, Scorpeka, was just released yesterday and we're so glad she's here to talk. So excited it. Isn't that an amazing jacket? Done, start orge nning. Okay, Sean, can you bring Ger on? Friend, it's so lovely to have you here in congratulations on the launch of Scorpeka. It just came out yesterday, right, it did, yes so this is my first, first virtual event to kick everything off right. We're so lucky. First, can you tell us a little bit about this beautiful book? Yes, and I have it with me total show it as well. I'm in love with this. This is original arts that they by I, who's amazing. So Scorpeka, as you said, is the first book in the five Queendom series and it's set in a matriarchal world. So, as you know, my historical fiction sort of has a theme of strong women and extraor many circumstances and they are, you know, fighting nature or...

...fighting crime or fighting the Patriarchy and and all of the other things that that American history is so cool. Of. I really wanted to do something different, and so this is a world where women are in charge and has enjoyed five hundred years of unbroken peace that way, with with five Queendoms, each run by a queen, until suddenly there is what a phenomenon called the drought of girls and just babies. Every baby is born a boy. It's just boys, boys, boys, both boys. No more girls are born and it stretches on for days and weeks and months and then years. And so the world of the five Queendoms has to change and counter that and that piece that was so established all of those centuries starts to crumble over time. So that's my that's my feminist game of thrones kind of epic fantasy launch. That's amazing. So wow. Well, this is such a departure for you. We're all familiar with your historical fiction novels, such as the magicians lie and Arctic Fury, which we US talk to you about on the show and an earlier episode. So can you talk to us about going from writing historicals to writing sweep, a sweeping, epic fantasy novel? Yeah, it's on one hand it's hugely different and on on the other hand it's not, because historical fiction, and those of you who write things that in the past also know, it's all world building, right. If you're if you're writing historical fiction, you're still choosing details and you're still drawing on you're still creating a world for the reader that doesn't currently exist. And in fantasy it's more made up than in historical fiction. You're drawing on research and you're drawing on our best approximation of what that world was actually like one thousand eight hundred fifty Chicago or it see s Theno or whatever period or writing, and you're constructing a world and you're trying to help the reader disappear into that world. But with this one I expect to get a lot fewer nitpicky emails. There's no such thing as that store on seven. No, I mean there is. Nobody can write to me and say, well, you said that the Scorpicans were hunting coney's and like the fall and coney's. Don't you know? That's sure, there's hunting season. I'm like, I made up Scorpeka, I made up Coney's. I'M A, I made up everything. You cannot tell you I'm wrong. That awesome. Anything complain about at a panicky moment with a code hanger earlier this week. And Yeah, and ours without them. So I understand. Oh you mean we're someone told you about a cod hanger in your book, not to eat, just panics because you saw a code. Oh my gosh. And then I was like Nope, nope, it's okay, okay, I was right. I was right, you know. So this is so original and so exciting. I cannot wait to read it. I need to know where it came from. I need to know what the spark or the origin or the beginning of this book was for you. I have to before you answer, I have to tell you that one of my best five star reviews tells me how realistic my blizzard was. So I think there might have been a little crossover with the Arctic fury, since there's no blizzards and Savannah. It's funny book came out right around the same time surviving. So somebody gave you a five star review, but I got it so well. So I'm dying to know that the spark of this story. It's just so fascinating. Its sound in a way like it came out of nowhere, because it's funny, when I was doing tours and events like this for historical fiction, people would say, Oh, do you plan to always write historical fiction, and I would say yes, because all of my ideas are historical fiction ideas, and that I should have known. One day an idea hit me and it was not a historical fiction idea and I had to decide whether I was the one to write it or not. So it was really, in a lot of ways, of reaction to fantasy books that I had read that were classics, the TV show adaptation of game of thrones, just all of these very mail dominated fantasy worlds and I thought I really like to read something that's, you know, more are more infused with Feminine Spirit, has more female main characters, has more women showing all the breadth and depth and different ways that women can be mothers and Queens and warriors and and whatever. So really first I just wanted to read a book like that and then I couldn't find one that was quite what I wanted and I talked to my agent. I said I've got this idea and even though she didn't represent fantasy and even though it was so, so, so different from everything that I was doing, she said, if that's what you want to write, you should...

...write it, and then a multi year journey begain. But, but that's where that's where it came from. was just wanting to have a book set in a matriarchy that wasn't a dystopia. It's not women are in charge and everything's terrible now, and it's not a utopia. Yeah, women are in charge and everything so much better. It's just it's the foils of humanity are the foils of humanity are always going to have ruthless people and tenderhearted people and and good mothers and bad mothers and everybody in between. Well, you said it was a multi year journey. How long did it? I mean, obviously there's four more books coming, but how long did it take you to build the world and write just book one? I I'm sort of a messy writer, so I it didn't take me more than a year to get the first draft of, okay, the book done, but then it needed so many more drafts. Victoria is rot is so much more articulate about like smashing the glass orb and and all of that. I you know, it's perfect in my head and I ruin it by writing it down. But the the my writing process is rewriting. It's I have to have something on the page and then I go back and I fix and I fix and I fix and I fix, and then I also got a lot of input from my agent at the time, who is still my agent, but only for historical fiction. She gave me her blessing to to get an agent just for the fantasy work. So both of them had a great handed helping shape it over time. But that was that was the multiyear process. So for publishing. It was relatively quick, okay, because it was less than five years, but it's, you know, but it still felt like rather, rather an epicat that feels find yet as yeah, you know, excuse me, in a blurb for Scorpeca, our friend K Quinn. Who who doesn't want a K QUIN BLURB? WHO Doesn't dream of that? Yeah, I mean we're talking Alice, network, hunt, the huntress and rose coode. She described it as a game of thrones for all the ladies out there who loved game of thrones but hated the mad queen. Finish, a richly jump drawn fantasy world, people by fierce women, Smart Women, Warrior Women, women to make you stand up and roar, and I love that lovest hunt a blurb. Yeah, exactly. Why do you think the time is right for a story like this? I was world run by strong, capable women, you know, like us, I think the Times always right for that. It needs to me. To me, never be enough books like this. And I love that you quoted the KP blurb, because Kate writes amazing books, but Kate also writes amazing verbs. So she says, yeah, exactly, how to sort of get to the heart of things and I think those skills are probably linked. But I think, you know, this is a genre where we can imagine absolutely anything. You know, historical fiction were somewhat bound but my historical fictions, some of that is very fact based and some of it is more sort of in a loose jumping off point, you know, with made up characters and made up plots but set in real places. But there's still they're still boundaries, they're still guidelines, there are still, you know, areas that we need to stay within. In fantasy and SCI FI, speculative fiction, you can do anything. There's absolutely no limit whatsoever to what you can do. So why don't we have more worlds run by women in fantasy? And there's more fantasy is much more diverse and more interesting than it used to be, because it does still have sort of that reputation of being the male dominated nights and swords and, you know, epic quests and just as that being the only thing that to see is in fantasy as so many more things than that. So I'm really excited when I see strong female main characters, but just to have a world where women are in charge, because that's the way it's always been. It gets you. It gives you so much more to play with and it gives you so many more different ways to to get invested into characters and to show characters, because you'll have something like Lord of the Rings where you only have a few female characters and so they sort of represent all women and that's not how I is right. We all know women who are all different things, so you really need as many of those characters as possible. I think so career, with this whole store, this whole series now stretching before you, that you started off with Scorpica, do you see yourself just doing that for a while, or will you still keep a foot firmly planted in historical fiction? I'm still I'm still playing around with some historical fiction ideas, so I can't rule it out. I do...

...have annual deadlines for I was going to say you gotta this. The series a heady. I got a lot of this going on, but do at least I didn't call it like the ten queen them. So I know, I feel like five is kind of a good number and I'm actually only contracted for three right now, so I'm hoping. I'm you know, I've got five and in my head. But yeah, so I'm committed to that. I'm moving forward with that. I very much hope to write in this world. I feel like, now that the world was built, I could just play around in it forever. But I do also have a couple of intriguing women from American history, which is my specialty, and historical fiction. I still have a couple of those that I feel like, if nobody else gets around to writing about them, I want to love it. Well, career. It was such a delight to have you here tonight. Thank you so much for being with us and yeah, it was so great to see you again. Happy to pop. We feel exciting about and so forward to this and I wish I had a glass of champagne to raise because this is feels this feels very fastive. This is career. I hope, I hope that people will check you out on on your social media, because I saw a beautiful picture that you posted yesterday of the cover of Scorporca with a beautiful glass of champagne, but was just it. I just looked at it and I thought like, oh my gosh, that's art, that's beautiful. So I hope everyone goes on and check that out. I hope they check out the book to so to all of you out there, thank you for joining us and thanks, as always, for all of the kindness and support you show for us and for other members of the friends and fiction community. We loved seeing so many of you in Sudana last weekends and we hope to see many more of you on the road in the coming months. We Adore you, all of you, and we are so glad you're here. Good night, everybody. Thank you for tuning in. You can join us every week on facebook or Youtube, where our live show airs on Wednesday nights at seven PM eastern time. Also, subscribe to our podcast and follow us on instagram. We're so glad you're here.

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