Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 2 months ago

WB S1E8: Ron Block & MKA with Jean Hanff Korelitz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

WRITERS' BLOCK: Ron Block and Mary Kay Andrews talk with Jean Hanff Korelitz about her hugely popular novel, The Plot.

...did you make jake intentionallydislikable to start? I love this question. Welcome to the Friends andfiction writer's Block podcast. Five new york times, bestselling authors,one rock star librarian and endless stories joined mary Kay andrews,Christine Harmel, Christie Woodson, harvey paddy, Callaghan, Henry, MaryAlice Munro and Ron Block as novelists. We are five longtime friends with 85books between us. I am Ron Block, I am so glad you've joined us forfascinating author interviews along with insider. Talk about publishing andwriting. If you love books and are curious about the writing world, youare in the right place. Friends and fiction podcast is sponsored by MamaGeraldine's bodacious foods. Cathy Cunningham was a successful butunfulfilled radio executive in Atlanta one night while sipping wine andsnacking on expensive cheese straws, she realized her mama Geraldine's owncheese straw recipe was far superior. The idea of for Cathy's company wasborn Mama Geraldine's cheese straws now coming six varieties and they are thebest selling cheese straw in the US plus the cookies are melt in your mouth,Delish yummy snacks and a woman owned empire. Now that's something we canreally get behind and Friends in fiction, Try them. You'll be glad youdid get 20% off your online order with the Code Fab Five. Welcome to a new episode of Friends andfiction writer's block on this episode, we're truly honored to welcome jeanhalf correlates her latest book. The plot was out in May to huge acclaim andan instant new york times bestseller. In addition to the plot, Jeanne is theauthor of the novels you should have known, which actually aired on HBO inOctober 2020 as the undoing. And I think everybody in America was tunedinto that. But that started Nicole Kidman Hugh Grant and Donald Sutherlandadmission was another of her books and it was adapted as a film in 2013starring Tina Fey. She's also written The Devil and Webster, The White Rose,the Sabbath Day River and a jury of her peers as well as interference powder,which was a novel for Children. So what doesn't she do? Her company booked thewriter, which I'm so interested in hearing about. They host pop up bookgroups in which small groups of readers discuss new books with their authors.She lives in new york city with her husband, irish poet, paul muldoon, I amRon block and I am mary Kay andrews and we can't wait to talk about thisintricately woven novel that took readers by storm in May of this year.It has been hailed by Kirkus reviews as in the best tradition of PatriciaHighsmith and other chroniclers of the human psyches. Darkest depths, grippingand thoroughly unsettling. This one will be flying off the shelves. And ofcourse, Stephen King, you've heard of him that is hailed the plot as insanelyreadable. Welcome to the podcast, jean, we're so happy to have you. Thank youso many questions. Okay, I'm here. I'm ready. We have really been lookingtoward this gene. The book is a real nail biter, but it's it's like aliterary, psychological suspense and I'm one of those people that I thoughtI had it figured out, and I'm like, luckily the writing is amazing and Ican get into the rest of it. But boy, you had me, I had no idea what wasgoing to happen in this book. So, can you just tell everybody a little bitabout what the book is about and actually where the idea came from? Sure,well, the book is about a writer and, you know, there's this conventionalwisdom that you shouldn't write about...

...writers. Writers shouldn't write aboutwriters because nobody cares except for other writers. So, I kind of had thathanging over me the whole time, or people really going to care about anyof this stuff. And it's about a writer who's pretty much on a downwardtrajectory in his writing life. He had a moderate success with the first novel.And then I kind of ran out of steam and is pretty lost. So he's teaching in akind of bottom of the barrel low residency programs and into his classwalks just the worst of all possible students. This arrogant, obnoxious,narcissistic guy named Evan Parker. And Evan Parker immediately announces thathe doesn't need jake or anybody else because he has this idea for his novel,which is, you know, full proof. And, you know, we writers here that a lot awoman I know who works in publishing, told me that usually when people say Ihave a great idea for a novel, it translates to about four sentences, buta novel is a lot more than four sentences. So, anyway, Jake is prettydistressed at this state of affairs, especially since he, you know, he getsa kind of snapshot of what this plot is. And he knows that this this kid isabsolutely correct. He's going to have a massive success with this book. Andthen a few years later, when he discovers that this former student hasdied without writing the book, he does what any of us might at least considerdoing. And that is he writes his own novel, he doesn't steal a word, but hewrites his own novel with this plot. And he has all of the success that hisformer student thought would come to him. So unfortunately he can't enjoy itbecause he's terrified that somebody will accuse him of some nefarious actand eventually somebody does. And that's kind of where the novel beginsto become a very twisty and revelatory. One hopes story. This book gave me suchanxiety as a writer. I was right beside Jake, curled up in a fetal position,hoping nobody would figure out that I'm an impostor and that there you go. Yeah,I mean, take this all of us. I mean, no matter how successful we may be or weare thought to be our our mind goes to our deepest failure at all times. Wenever forget the special delight of walking into our local Barnes and nobleto give a reading. And the only person there is our mom. So it it never goesaway. Tell me about how you decided to construct the book. Or more to thepoint to write two books to include Jake'sbook and Jake's novel in the book is called Crib not the crib, which is avery important distinction. I actually jeans saw your interview with CarolFitzgerald. So I know a little bit about that, but I want you to if youwould tell the listeners how you wove these together in such an interestingway and what your initial instinct was to do with this book. Well, I'm gladyou mentioned Carol Fitzgerald because in fact that is the person who came upwith the factoid about most people that for most people who have a brilliantidea for a novel, it's actually four sentences. They have four sentencesworth of the story. So I want to give a lot of credit, Carol Fitzgerald, she'sa brilliant woman. So I really can't take credit for the uh for puttingthose chapters in because I did my best to get out of it. I tried not to writethem. I was in the middle of writing the book when I heard an interview withlilly King about her novel writers and lovers, in which she was asked, kind ofthe opposite question, why did you...

...decide not to put the book within abook in your book? And she said, well, I decided that no matter what I wrote,it could never be good enough to justify the success that this bookwithin the book of writers and lovers experiences. And I thought, great,she's not doing hers, I don't do much either. And I turned in the bookwithout those chapters and my editor said, where are the chapters? And Isaid, I'm not going to write that, stopped writing her, I'm not writing,but she said, you have to write them. And so, you know, of course she wasright and and I went and I kind of wrote them all in order and then I kindof divided them up because they are part of the revelation of what the plotis and what Jake has done and and what the reality may or may not be behindthe story that Jake wrote as fiction. So it's all very convoluted. It took alot of, you know, putting chapters out on the floor and figuring out what goeswhere, Sorry, That's amazing. Yeah, but it did feel it did almost feel like Iwas reading to authors work. So it really was very successful. I think itgave us a lot of insight. I really, really appreciated that as a reader. SoI'm going to go back just a little bit. So where did the idea for the book comefrom? What was the spark? It came out of the wild blue Yonder. It really did.I was in the middle of a a very different book, which I was reallystruggling with and I was literally in my editor's office having a veryunhappy conversation about why she was not buying the book when I just started,you know, downloading this idea that I had. And I barely had. I mean, I hadtwo things. I had this failed writer who steals a story from his latestudent and I had what that story was. And I really kind of, I'm not a seat byseat of my pants cut a person at all. But that day, I don't know, it justreally if I believed in anything supernatural, I would I would credit itto that. But I don't, I honestly don't know how I how I even spoke up in thatmeeting. I'm not that's not really the way I roll. But that day I just said, Ihave this other idea and I just started telling her the story and I could seeher get more and more excited, which was very gratifying because after all,we were having a meeting about why she wasn't buying my book. And by the nextday, to my shock and delight, I had a contract for both books, which I'venever had that as in my career. So it was it was very reassuring. And then,you know, we decided that I would decide that novel, which is called TheLate Comer. And I would write this new idea because clearly I needed somespace from that other novel. I I was burned out and I'm sure, you know, youknow what that feels like. So, so and then, you know, the entire planet justshut down. And I was in this house in upstate new york and that's all I didfor four months. I just wrote this book. So I can't tell you where it came from.But I love it one minute, it wasn't there the next minute it was there welove hearing the story behind it. When you told your editor that you had thisidea, did you know that the book within a book was called crib? No, no. I mean,I knew 20% of what ended up being in the plot. I I knew that he doessomething which is morally dubious. Although, you know, when push comes toshove, I don't think he did anything wrong, but his fear of exposure, hisfear of what people who don't happen to be writers of fiction might think ofwhat he did. It's quite valid, quite on target. And, you know, it overwhelmshis, kind of, kind of high mindedness about the fact that he really hasn'tdone anything terribly wrong. So I knew...

...that, and I knew what the plot was, andthat was pretty much it. You know, this book is full of literary easter eggs,most notably the inspiration of Patricia Highsmith and of course, theillusion to the talented Mr Ripley. Could you talk a little bit about? Ican see definitely see some comparisons or some inspiration from PatriciaHighsmith to your work. Do you do you think that's an apt description orwould you just say no, you're wrong? No, you're not wrong if you're not wrong. Imean, I've read a couple of at least one biography of Highsmith, so I cantell you that we were extremely different people. I mean, I I have aoveractive morality meter going on inside me. I think she had frolickedthrough life without much of one. I'm not a massive Highsmith fan. I mean, Icertainly have enjoyed the Ripley novels. I've read a few of her othernovels. I read The Price of Salt, which I thought was terrific, but I meanshe's not my, my guiding star. It was a bit of fun to call the the collegeRipley and to sort of play with that later. Um, I worried it might give toomuch away actually, but it was too fun to leave out, frankly, that was perfect.So I want to I want to know a little bit more about how you develop jake.One of the things that I just thought was amazing was how complex he was, butone of my favorite parts was hearing his inner voice in his head, he wouldsay something out loud and then we'd hear him in the back, it just rang socinematically, can you tell us how you developed him and put and wove that in,you know, he's really, all of us were all jake someone I just met you, but II would imagine there's something in Jake that you identified with as well.I mean, a part of our great conflict as writers is that we're readers as welland we've been at it for years, we've been at it since we've discovered books.I don't know when that was For you, but for me it was when I learned to read 5,6 years old. So there's decades and decades of hundreds and hundreds ofstories, books, characters, language all knocking around in my head. Andwhen we write, you know, we can't ever be sure where that line came from,where that character came from. Have we heard about this situation before? Havewe read this combination of words before? It's weird. It's like we'rewalking on thin ice at all times. And if you're of a moral bent as I tend tobe, you're worried that you're appropriating always and you know, addto that, that there are very few stories at their in their essence. Sowe're, you know, we're in a river that's been flowing long before we gotthere and we'll continue one hopes long after we leave. And philosophicallythat's not a problem. But I am always kind of haunted by concern that I amappropriating. I'm not talking about cultural appropriation, that's a wholenew thing. But you know, if a sentence sounds familiar to me, I'll even if Ihave no idea where it came from, I'll err on the side of caution and cut itout. But the fear is always there and that is that that is the fear that jakereally embodies for a lot of us I think. So. True. So true. I once heard ourother host mary Kay Andrews say that she doesn't read in her genre whenshe's writing because she's so afraid she's gonna steal something withoutthinking about it. There you go. Yeah. I'm always terrified. I was interestedabout how did you make jake...

...intentionally? Um dislikable to start.I love this question because I I don't know about you but in the past, I don'tknow 25 years the cult of the likable heroine or hero seems to have arisenamong us and people back in the forties and fifties and sixties, 19th centurynobody worried about the likability of a hero. I maybe because I I used tostudy 18th century fiction and I loved 19th century fiction. I arrived in myown writing life without any compulsion to make a likable hero or her. In fact,I'm not all that interested in super nice people. I mean, take ElizabethBennett, one of the greatest heroines of all time. I mean, she's she's a bitnasty, she's a bit judgmental and hostile, She's still awesome, you know,and I read many, many reviews of my work which incorporated some element of,well I just didn't like her or I just didn't like him. And I and I alwayswant to say, well I'm sure she wouldn't like you either. But what was the pointthat you're making? Are you looking for a friend in the pages of a book?Because they're not they're you know, they're at the grocery store there inthe spin class, go find them there. Um So no, he's not a particularly likeableguy. I don't want to get a beer with him, but he is interesting to me, veryinteresting. Yeah, no doubt. You know, maybe it's because, you know, mybackground, I started writing category mystery, but it wasn't really for me,it wasn't until Jake took matters into his own hands when he, you know,unfurled himself from that fetal position on and when he actually wentout and started tracking down Evans past that I actually begrudginglythought, okay, I I'm in I mean I was of course fascinated with this guy, likeyou're fascinated with, with a sociopath um which he is not as itturns out there's someone else who is and of course I had, I was, as I wasmentioning before we started recording, I had to laugh when jake traveled toAthens and you G. A. Which was my alma mater. I thought you kind of reallynailed Bulldog Nation there. Thank you. That means a lot to me because I wasquite concerned about it. That the strange thing is that in this house inupstate new york during the pandemic, I was I was writing this novel and myhusband was downstairs sitting at that table writing a musical based onAristotelian is the frogs, which is also set in Athens Georgia and in factit's called Athens Georgia. And so it's just hilarious that we were bothwriting about Athens Georgia at the same time. Well you're going to ask ifI've been to Athens Georgia. I've been there once, I've been there once, but Ihave a friend who lives down there and she, she talked to me a little bitabout, I was fascinated by these kind of housing units, these kind of littleself contained country club style things where the students all live.That's definitely, yeah, that's definitely not a feature of, I wouldsay the northeast, basically. Yes, I think location is a big part of yourbook too. So why? And you mentioned that you're in upstate new york, butwhy would you set it there? Because it really seems a perfect spot for a lotof what you write. Well, that's good to know. I've never written about thisarea before and we've had this house for about five years, but we wereliving here full time during the pandemic. And it just, you know, thefirst thing I did was I put jake here in this little town, which is a veryinteresting little town, which is kind of going up and going down at the sametime called Sharon springs new york. We...

...got a big jolt of excitement a fewyears ago. I think one of you mentioned the Beekman boys and their brandBeekman 18 oh two is kind of put this place on the mouth and that's how Iheard about this town. We just came through one night and went for a walkand saw this house and you know the rest is history. But I think those twoguys and the business that they started have brought in, a lot of people likeme and that's been great. On the other hand, the town is like falling downaround us. Literally one of the old hotels collapsed about a year ago justovernight just fell down. So you know, it's such a cute All of the overlookhotels. I mean they're all empty, you can buy them for $10,000. Somebody justdid you know, this town could it could be a really fascinating, brilliant,amazing place. But right now it's super cool but it could do even more. But I'msorry. Just to answer your question, Having foot jake here basically in thistown, it made sense that when he started to write his story he would belooking at towns in the area where he was and that brought me to Earlvilleand Hamilton. I wanted a small town that was close to a town with a collegewhich would represent the wider world for a young local, smart, ambitiousperson. Hamilton is also such a beautiful area, the colleges. Somethingelse. Let's talk about the themes of the book a little bit. Or at least somespecific themes you talk about who owns ideas and what are the lines inintellectual property. And I'm gonna actually ask mary Kay the same question.I wanna ask you both what is your, what are your thoughts on that And and howdid you feel that jake skated the line? Right. Well I don't know how you feelmary. Kay, but I do not feel it is my right to tell anybody what they'reallowed. I'm not allowed to write and I certainly don't want anybody telling mewhat I'm allowed to. Right? I think we have, I'm sure you've been followingthis kind of recent dust up about the short story Cap Person, which isfascinating to all of us. That this is a short story that you know, was hugelysuccessful and widely read, published in the new yorker. And then literallylast week somebody published an essay in which they said I've alwayssuspected the story is about me and I was right and she did confirm this, butthere was a connection between herself and the author. So then the questionbecomes, are you entitled to take my story that you just heard about andweave a narrative out of it when the answer is yeah, she she wasn't. Theauthor was entitled to do that. You want to take care not to harm. Youdon't want to leave identifiable details in your story. And I think inthat particular case, the author could have used more care. But, you know,we're magpies, we pick up shiny things off the ground. Things we've bredthings, we've heard things we've experienced, things are worst enemyexperience, things are best friend experience. That is how we make fiction.And I would argue other kinds of art as well. But I'm mainly concerned withfiction. What do you think? I think, you know, we are out in the world andthe world, things happen in the world and we, you know, I've I've written Iwrote a novel where the woman in the in the book is obsessed with all thedivorce going on around her. And she's so she's mapping it on a map and she'safraid it's coming to her house and she's so obsessed with other people'sdivorce that their marriage is crumbling. She doesn't notice her ownis crumbling. So I wrote part of this book is something that happens andsomething similar happened to a neighbor. And and and they and myneighbor said, well you wrote about my life and I said, no, I wrote about myreaction to what happened in your life.

And I filtered it through theimagination of my protagonist. But she sounds good with that. They still thinkI stole their life. But that's I mean, we're still I'm still friends with thehusband. Not so much the ex, but I mean I'm you know, when you're out in theworld, people will say be careful what you say around here because you'll useit in a novel. I'm like yeah, I got my got my notebook right here. Yeah. Yeah.But I think if you everything comes filtered through our imagination, ourand you know, it comes I hope comes out in our in the voice, our voice whichyou hope is this distinctive or and it comes out and the very you hope uniquevoices of your characters who are generally speaking nothing like thevery most mostly boring people who tell you these stories. I'm like always likeI always tell people, you know, don't worry about it because you're reallynot interesting enough for me to steal your story. I mean, also it is verypossible to describe things in ways that make it sound like our story. Andeven in that woman's essay, she said something like, well this part of thestory, cat person wasn't like my life and then she just glosses over that andgoes to the next thing that is like her life. So I mean we're all focusing onthe three or four things or the shiny little bits that resonate with us andthen we ignore everything else that isn't from us at all. That's a humanthing. I guess maybe it's all about connection. Who knows? Maybe maybehysterical Gene, you said you wrote the plot in only four months now. It's bad,doesn't it? No, actually I wrote I wrote a novel an extra novel this yearbecause there wasn't anything to do during the pandemic. How but how wasthe plot different from your other from your previous work? Is it verydifferent? Uh Yes and no, I mean part of the reason I've been somewhatobscure until novel number seven is that I I wasn't comfortable in a genre,I don't I don't know about you, but I don't have $10 going at one time, 10ideas. I have one idea at a time and sometimes that idea is more plot driven,sometimes it's more character driven. You know, this genre thing has been theone of the most annoying things that I've ever dealt with. Publishers quiteunderstandably want you to be in a predictable group. They want, you know,they want Gillian Flynn to write a Gillian Flynn novel. They want Jonathanfranzen try to Jonathan franzen novel, they're not happy when people startjumping around and that is what I have done from the beginning. So this onewas clearly uh intensely flock driven. But I still think of myself as aliterary writer and I try to write every sentence as well as I can. If asentence is ugly or clunky, I can't go on, I have to go back and fix it. Theseare the things that have been true from the beginning of my right in life. Sohow is it different? You know, it's like if my career is a scatter grahamwith plot here and language here, it's clearly closer to the plot and butthey're all, you know, they were all propulsive to me at the time andwritten very carefully. That's all I could say. I think that's wonderfulbecause all of the care that you give really does shine through. And asreaders, we truly appreciate that super literary and just everything somebodywants suspense, They want to read a thriller, they want to read a mystery,they want to read a literary novel.

It's all here in the plant. Were nohuge fans, huge fans. That's great. Thank you. Yeah. Well yeah. And then atthe end with the green soup. Yeah. Yeah. But I will say that when a certain soupenters, that's when my daughter said she screamed out lag. So that was verygratifying. I want to make my daughter scream out loud. That's good. You know,we good barometer. When of course when I read about the plot I thought oh myGod this is the woman who wrote the novel that the undoing was based uponloosely. It turns out I loved I love what you told carol about. You didn'tknow who did it either. I didn't think everybody was, you know, who did it. Hedid not like, I don't know, don't ask me. I mean, it's already gone so farfrom my book. But um, I was I was reassured by the end. I I thought itwas very interesting how David e kelly, you know, kind of brought it back tothe novel in a way. He took us on a tour and he brought us home. You know,I'm interested, you said that you you had this meeting with your editor andthey were like, I'm not going to buy your next book. How does that happenafter they make an incredible blockbuster, like, the undoing fromyour previous book? You should have known. I mean, I think I'm doing hasbeen shown yet. So nobody knew it was going to be what it was. But I mean, myby the way, just as we started this conversation, an email came in from myeditor following her reading the novel. I turned in last week that I turned myphone over and I don't know what it says. I've got this incredible suspenseall through this interview, but I'm freaking out. I don't know what shesays. But she wanted that book this book to be as good as it could be. Imean she did not want to buy it until it was it was as good as it could be.And I respect that and I am grateful for it because I want the same. I thinka lot of I think a lot of readers have this idea that once you have a bestseller or a hit book or a movie made from a book that now you have thegolden ticket and your life is harmed. Talk about that a little bit. Well, youknow, it certainly was not true for me. I doubt it's true for other people. Butif it is true, it shouldn't be true because you want you want the same carefor that post HBO book as you should want for every book that you right. Imean, I remember when my first two novels were not published, they wererejected everywhere. And when my next novel was published, I said to my agentat that time, great, now, we can, you know, now we can go back and get thosefirst two books published. And she said, no, she said, you're a better writer.Now put this away and forget about them. And, you know, that was prettydisappointing at the time. But of course, it was the right thing to sayand the right thing to do. And I also feel that if those early novels havebeen published, I probably would not be in the position that I am today becauseI would be they would kind of be a weight on my writing history. And youknow, if you turn off a reader with one novel, they're not coming back, nomatter if your next book is a best seller, if other readers are like me,they'll say, oh, you know, I read one of his books and it wasn't that good.So I'm not going to I'll read something else. So it's it's probably for thebest. Do you think that the plot, the movie they make or the series,streaming series, they'll make from the plot? Um now that's from this thisgoing to be made by the same team. Is that my understanding? No, no, no, Iactually can't say too much about it. I...

...think there might be an announcementsoon about it. But the only thing I can say is that this time I get to be inthe writer's room, which I'm very, very thrilled about something I reallywanted to learn to try. I'll be like the most inexperienced person in there,like, underneath the recent film school graduate. But that's okay, because, youknow, when you get to my age, it's the great thing is to keep learning stuff,and I'm really looking forward to learning how to do this. I think it'sgoing to be amazing and probably better for your involvement because it willkeep it on track, because it was just such a tightly woven story, let'schange gears just a little bit, and I want to talk about books, the writer,how did it come out? How did how tell me some of the highlights, anything youwant to share about it? Yeah, Okay, so book the writers started as afundraiser when I lived in Princeton New Jersey for 25 years. My husbandteaches at Princeton and somebody said to me, you know, all these writers, whydon't you do something with the writers? And I said, okay, so I started thisthing, we call it the meet the author book group. And everybody in the bookgroup made a donation to this charity that I was on the border of the localcharity. And we went on for about eight years and it was great. We had about100 writers come to Princeton. A lot of them lived in Princeton. I didn't paythe authors, although I paid for their Travel. And then I said, Well, sell 20copies of your book, which you know, for most of us is a big deal. And butstill, I was amazed at some of the authors who said yes, I mean authorswho did not need to get on the train and come to Princeton, New Jersey andsit in the living room with 20 people to sell 20 bucks. They enjoyed itbecause I think for many writers to have a really intelligent conversationwith people who have read your work, not just you know, I love I love yourwork and I'm looking forward to reading this new book. That's great too. But toactually have a conversation with 20 intelligent people who have just readthe same book, your book. That's pretty cool. So when I moved back to New Yorkin 2013, I thought maybe this can be a business. You know, there are a lot ofwriters in new york for a lot of readers in new york. The first thing Iattempted was to send authors to local book groups, but that did not work. Iwas running into a lot of, well, I think this is a great idea, but I can'tget my book group to agree. And so I sort of flipped the concept and Istarted setting up the events and then, you know, that one person from eachbook group who thought it was a good idea would register, we would allgather in a, in an apartment in new york city, you know, 20 people andElizabeth stroud 20 people and Adriana Trigiani. It just really that startedto work when the pandemic happened. I really resisted the idea of goingonline. I'm very committed to be in the room experience, but some of myregulars asked me to please do it. And I started doing the events online. It'sbeen about a year and a half. And it's been very gratifying in its own waybecause of course, we could have people from Athens Georgia and all over theworld. We had we had people from all over the world, especially davidcacophony, David company talking about his novel for some reason, only women,I don't know why, but all over the world, but Argentina from South Africa,but not really not just dated to company. Um people found out about usfrom Australia, europe, South America all over America and it's been great.So, we're going to be online through the summer. We've got 44 books to go.One of them is tomorrow night, actually. And and then in the fall will go backto in room in person, in new york city. But I'm going to try to figure out whatI that I am some way to maintain and online element. So because we I don'twant to lose those fantastic readers that started to come to us from allover the world. Yeah, yeah. It's a...

...whole new realm. We're going into acombination of the two is going to be the future. Yeah. And if somebody has agrandchild, who knows how to do this, please get into us. Because I reallywould like to figure out how to do it without shoving a camera in the face ofthe author because that's very, you know, very out putting, right. We have an unbelievable lineup thisfall. We have chang Rae lee and juliana Margulies the actress and, and uh, sowe have the new plaque biography. We're going to do one with my husband. I mean,it's we've got uh Edmund Devil who wrote the heroin, Amber eyes has a newbook. We're doing him. I mean it's going to be great. So fascinating. AndI saw your interview with Adriana Trigiani where you talked about thisand I said, oh, I need to know more about that. That must have been a greatevent with her though. She's a party in a box. She is amazing. And her level ofgenerosity towards other authors is just unparalleled. I don't know how shedoesn't I mean, I've been in her home, her home is stunning and you know,she's got this many books piled up next to her and she's reading them all andshe's a powerhouse. She should be running the country. She really should.Should definitely. Okay, so what is next for you, jeanne? What are we goingto be eagerly anticipating? I'm gonna read my email and find out my book hasbeen accepted. Oh, well, don't ask me to do it. Well, I know I'm not that'sthat's immediately next. I'm sure I have more, a little more work to dothis book, but technically it's coming out in april it's called The Late Comer.It is a very different animal from, from the plot, but I'm I really lovethis book and you know, I kind of think of it as my meg Wolitzer novel. It'sabout a really crazy family uh with triplets who all hate one another andthey hate their parents. And almost 20 years after these triplets are born,the parents have another child from a leftover embryo from the triplets. Andit's really about how this family kind of solves the problem of itself, whichis not possible without the arrival of this late child. So that's what it'sabout. That's amazing. I want it now. You'll have to wait a little bit. It'skind of a book end. I wrote the newcomer this year. Next year, you'vegot the late comer. What's the newcomer about? Oh, the newcomer is uh, it's abeach. It's a summer beach book. It's about a woman who her sister's murderedand her sister before she was murdered has always told my protagonist, ifanything ever happens to me, grabbed my a my little girl and go because it's mymy partner, he did it. And so she grabs this four year old kid and runs and sheruns to a mom and pop motel on florida's west coast called themurmuring surf. She doesn't know why and she doesn't really know why she'sthere. Anyway, that's that's the whole thing. I just thought it was funny. Weshould come together. I would love it. I'll moderate. Ronald.I'll take care of that, gene, thank you so much for joining us here today. Ithas been such a thrill as you know, We love the book and everybody who'slistening If you haven't read the plot yet, all two or three of you run run,run and get a it's really it's everything you want in a book andespecially this summer it's such a great book to take to the beach or taketo your country home wherever. But it's it's really amazing and we are sothrilled for you and I can't wait to...

...see whatever treatment it might get inthe in the celluloid world. Yeah, I can't wait to see if we've got DonaldSutherland and a helicopter zooming into couldn't write that in. I love thebook, jean. Thank you so much so much. I really really appreciate you read myemail now so I buy everyone and thank you all for tuning into the Friends andfiction Writer's block podcast on behalf of mary Kay and the rest of theFriends and fiction team. We so appreciate you joining us. Pleaseconsider leaving a review on your favorite podcast platform and be sureto share with a friend As always we'll be back each friday with a new episodethat you are sure to love. Thanks everybody. Thank you for tuning in toFriends and Fiction Writer's Block podcast. Please be sure to subscribe,rate and review on your favorite podcast platform, tune in every fridayfor another episode. And you can also join us every week on facebook orYoutube where you can see our live Friends and fiction show that airs atseven p.m. Eastern Standard time. We are so glad you're here.

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