Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 7 months ago

WB-S2E18 The Homewreckers Launch with Mary Kay Andrews

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

WRITERS' BLOCK Ron Block and Kristy Woodson Harvey speak with Rachel Deloache Williams about her book, My Friend Anna and about the Netflix series, Inventing Anna, and how she was portrayed

This show is brought to you by our presenting sponsor, Charleston Coffee Roasters. Charleston coffee roasters painstakingly searches the world over for the highest quality coffee beans. They bring them home to Charleston, South Carolina, where slow roasting coaxes out their unique flavor. Along with their promise of great coffee, Charleston Coffee Roasters also pledges to help our planet and local communities. Globally, they support sustainable farming practices. Locally, they partner with the South Carolina seed Turtle Rescue Program Visit Their website, Charleston Coffee Roasterscom, and use the code coffee with friends, all lowercase, all one word, to get twenty percent off on all bagged coffees. Seem to have a fascination with cold case deaths. Is there something you need to tell us? I know, I think I'm like the I mean cold case is murder cases are a hot thing right now. True crime is a hot thing right now, but I've always been interested in it and since I was a little girl, my I used to go to my grandparents every Sunday for dinner at my mother's only brother was a was a police officer. He was a detective and later, later on, this is in chief of police and St Pete and he would talk about cases that he was investigating and I was a big newspaper reader from, you know, from the time I could hold a newspaper and I was interested in crime, and so I would read these crime stories and he could talk about cases and so that and I read Nancy drew, of course, like every other girl age. Welcome to the friends and Fiction Writers Block podcast For New York Times Best Selling Authors, one rock star Librarian and endless stories. Join Mary K Andrews, Kristin Harmel, Christy Woodson Harvey and Patty Callahan Henry, along with Ron Block. As novelists. We are for longtime friends with seventy books between us, and I am Ron Block. Please join us for fascinating author interviews and insider talk about publishing and writing. If you love books and are curious about the writing world, you are in the right place. Welcome to the friends and fiction writers block podcast. I am Ron Block and I am beyond excited to welcome today's guests. Mary K Andrews, who some of you might know. I don't know. Mary Kay is the New York Times best selling author of thirty, yes I said thirty, novels, including the whole wreckers, the Santa suit, the newcomer, hello, summer sunset, beach, the high tide club, the weekenders, Beach Town, save the date, ladies night, Christmas Bliss, Spring Fever, summer rental, fixed her up or deep dish blue, Christmas Havannah, breeze, his fit little bit elies and Savannah Blues, all along with one cook book, the Beach House Cookbook. I love saying all those names. It is so cool. It's almost like a history of knowing you. She's a native of St Petersburg, Florida, and she's earned a bea in journalism from the University of Georgia after a fourteen year career working as a reporter at newspapers, including the Savannam Morning News, the Mary had a journal and the Atlanta Journal Constitution, where she spent the final ten years of her career. She left journalism in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one to write fiction, and we are so glad you did. Me Too. Welcome Mary Kate Andrews Iron. How's it going? Great? Great, I'm so excited to talk to you about the home wreckers it. I texted you right and dry. Finished reading it. I was like, you...

...did it again. He did again. Oh God, Oh God. It's a congratulations on the book and I know that we're recording before the book is published, but it'll just be out, so everybody will hopefully have their hands on a copy already. Yeah, I hope so. Well, let's start dishing. So give us the elevator pitch overview of the book. Well, the Ham mackers is about a young woman. Her name is Hattie Cavanaugh and she restores old houses with her fatherinlaw, tug. She was widowed young and she still works for her father inlaw's company and, and that's said in Savannah. And when the book opens she has had a disastrous flip of an old, Falling Down House and downtown Savannah. Things haven't gone well. They've lost money on it and she encounters a producer from California who does reality television and he overhears her talking in a coffee shop about her latest flip and decides, sort of spur the moment, I've got an idea for a show. I'll call it the home wreckers. It'll be a great reality you know, HDTV type show, and this this young woman who's very outspoken and she's photogenic and I'll pare her with a designer and we'll call the show the home wreckers. And so he pitches the show to her and she's very reluctant, but she needs money. She's in a tight spot, and so she and her best friend, her best friend's name is cassidy. They've been friends since prochial school in Savannah, and so she and Cassidy get cast on the show the home wreckers, and the the network decides to expand the producer's idea and actually make it sort of like it's like a cry offs between flipper flop and the bachelor. They pair her with this very slick, highprofile, gorgeous designer from La and they tell her at the onset, okay, now you have to buy the House to fix up, which is comes as a huge shock to Hattie. She thought, you know, on those shows she just believed that, you know, the network buys these houses, but that's not actually how it works, it turns out. So she finds out about an old house, a beach house Allen Tybee Island, and she scrapes up every last time she has, she hawks her engagement ring, which is an important thing, and she buys this house and stuff happens and stuff happens, that's for sure. So I want to know a little bit because I know that you kind of like right by the seat of your pants a lot, but I think combining a an HGTV type show with a reality show like the bachelor couldn't have just come to your brain. Did you help? A kind of research did you do to pull those together? Well, it did you know? I was watching an HGTV show. I don't know if it was the fix her upper, which, by the way, I had that title long before chip and Joe Showed Up, and Waco, but I was watching one of those shows. I thought, you know, I love to write about and my fans like those kinds of books that have what my former editor called House porn and I thought, what if I write about a protagonist who is fixing up old houses and Savannah and she buys an old house out at Tybe Island and cross that with a dating should kind of show? And so for the research for the book, unfortunately I had to do the research during covid during walkdown, and a lot of shows. A lot of those shows were shut down or they had close sets. Most of them were closed down, so I couldn't...

...go actually watch a show being filmed for the research. So I kind of had to do my research by the Sea of the pants. I did talk to a woman here in Atlanta, Anita Corsiny. She and her husband can have a show on HGTV and I talked to her about that and I you know. So I talked. I talked to people. That's right. You know a lot of people. I don't know why, I have no problem calling them up and asking, I'm stupid, questions. I'm sure they'd love hearing from you. Okay, the other thing that strikes me about this book is, like so many of your others, your characters are just so well developed and just so you can't help but loon in. They're good and all their bad, but this one seemed to be at a new level. I don't know if it was the setting or what it was, but they really did so. But can you talk to us about some of these characters, where the germ for them came from? I'm talking like Hattie, CASS Modu, Rebecca, my favorite, and Nobia. Ah, yeah, Zobia. Well, Hattie just came to me and I knew from the beginning that she had married her high school sweetheart young and that he'd been killed in a in a motorcycle accident, a hit and run motorcycle accident. I knew that her best friend from prochial school, they gone all through Catholic schools and Savannah, was cassidy. I knew that Hattie's folks split up when she was in her early teens and her father got involved in a scandal. He actually still money from a nonprofit charity and so when her parents split up, her father goes to prison and her mother it's a huge scandal and her mother, to escape the scandal, moves away to Florida and Haddie doesn't want to go. She wants to stay right where she is and so she goes to live with CASS and her mom, and her mom is so Nobia, and Zenobia is basically runs cabin on sons, the house, the construction company, and she's a tart ton African American Mama who says what she thinks and she was fun to write and casses was fun to write. And then the the television producer Molopez I liked. You know, I fall in love with my characters, for the bad guys, and even sometimes the bad guys worm their way into my good graces. I'm always surprised when that happens. There's sometimes routeemable. They are sometimes redeemable. The sort of the arch villain of the book is Rebecca. She's a network executive that's making the decisions and who basically is calm the shots on this show and saying, you know, let's spice it up, let's play up the relationship, even though it's it's not really a real one, between Hattie and the California the La Designer. They bring him very high profile. His name is Trey Bartholomew and he's a pretty boy. Has a really fun nickname throughout the book, which I won't give away. Yes, yes, he does, and that's a little bit about it. You Know Savannah. I've lived there and work there. I started my newspaper career. They're out of right out of college. Savannah's one of these places where you know family, money and family name still means something, but there are lots of secrets and scandals still there. So it's a great place. It's a great place to write about because it's very it's very intriguing and so, you know, I wanted Hattie. There's a whiff of scandal that's been attached to her, and so when she marries Hank, her now her late husband,...

...she takes his name immediately because she doesn't she don't want to have her father's name because he's, you know, sent to prison. It was in the big house. Yeah, okay, so I've noticed, been noticing through the last several books they kind of go back to your beginning roots and you seem to have a fascination with cold case deaths. Is there something you need to tell us? I know, I think I'm like the I mean cold case is murder cases are a hot thing right now. True crime is a hot thing right now. But I've always been interested in it and since I was a little girl, my I used to go to my grandparents every Sunday for dinner at my mother's only brother was a was a police officer. He was a detective and later, later on, assistant chief of police and St Pete and he would talk about cases that he was investigating and I was a big newspaper reader from, you know, from the time I could hold a newspaper and I was interested in crime and so I would read these crime stories and even talk about cases and so that and I read Nancy drew, of course, like every other girl age, and I think Um, I think everybody. I think that just kind of was part of my DNA. So when I went to journalism school I was interested in crime reporting. I did some Herme reporting as a journalist and cold case is kind of got into my blood. I when I wrote on St Beach has an old cold case that is actually loosely based on a very wellknown unsolved murder here in Atlanta and I just transferred that that case to Savannah and for if there's anybody listening, who's a cold case buff the real case was called Mary shotwell, little who disappeared from Atlanta's first mall was never heard from again. That case is never been solved and I wrote stories about that over the years and that story loosely, loosely inspired the plot of Sunset Beach. And so with this case, I didn't know how the murder was going to happen. I knew that there would be a body somewhere and so I started thinking about that and you know, I never know if it's life imitating art or Art Imitating Life. But in two thousand and twenty we bought and started restoring an old beach cottage on Tybee island. That's if I have a hobby. That's what it is. I don't play golf, I don't play tennis, I play House. We bought this House and we started working on it with our contractors and they were tearing out the back wall of a downstairs bathroom that had termite damage and the whole wall had to come out and it was the wall of a bathroom and the contractors called me over one day and said look what we just found in the wall behind this old razorblade slot, and it was a woman's billfold and it had been there, turns out, since nineteen fifty four. And I had the woman's all of her her ID, it had her social security card, it had her her she was a military spouse, her husband was in the navy and he was at sea. They've had family pictures and so I did a quick Internet search and I found out that Melba, whose wallet we found, Melba had lived in the house only one year in nineteen fifty four and she had been dead for some years when I found that wallet. But and I found her obituary online but I couldn't find I knew she had grown children who were in there s and s because I found her obituary. And that night I put on facebook or Instagram I think, hey, I found this wallet and it's so interesting and I'm trying to track down her family if they're her...

...survivors. And by the time I woke up the next morning somebody had given me contact information for her son and daughter and it's a long story, but I did talk to them. They had no idea how that wallet got in the wall. But I thought, okay, now this is interesting. What if that wallet in the wall turns out to belong to a woman who disappeared seventeen years earlier, and what if it's in had e Speach House that she is working on? And what if the wallet belongs to a Beloved High School Teacher who had befriended Hattie in the years after her father left and and and was understanding and talked to her about this kind of stuff? And so then the question as well. And the woman's name is Laniar and I'll tell you, I wasn't even thinking about this. When I was writing at I thought I was stealing the name of a friend of ours. Our friend Patty Henry has a friend whose name is lanniar and I've always liked that name. So I thought, well, all borrow Lanier's name for my character, the missing school teacher. She's twenty five years old and her name is laniar Reagan and she's married to a very successful high school football coach in Savannah at the local prep, Catholic, prep, boys prep school. But is it turns out at when I was doing the copy if I went, oh my gosh, the middle name Melba's name actually was lanear. Oh, I didn't know that hard I'd forgotten about it until I found the pictures of the wallet. Because I did. The family came down and they and they got the wallet and we did a little thing on on the local news and Savannah. And then I have another dear friend whose middle name is lanear. So and Lannear is a very well known name in Georgia. You Know Sydney, Laniar was the Atlrien of Georgia. But it's one of those quirky things where like wow, is this the universe whispering in my ear could totally have been. This is such a minor part of your story, but I actually had to go and research about razor blades slots in walls because I had never heard about that before. I thought all that's got to be made up. No, nope, it's a rounds and the razor blade slot in the wall, Bathroom Wall at our house, was the size of the Tissue Dispenser. So that's I mean we have we've read one about five or six old houses over the years and I've I think we've had them in like at least two houses in the bathroom medicine cabinets. When you tear out the old bathroom medicine cabinets that are recessed into the wall, that's where you see him. And I mean why? I guess you didn't throw them in the trash because then you'd cut yourself right. Makes Sense now, but die of lockjaw? I guess I don't know. Okay, so the wallet is just one example of how you really are so good at putting yourself on the page. And I wanted to talk about some of the locations in the home wreckers because there's so many type island in Savanna spots that you feature in there, and they're all real, but I love reading about them since I have been there. So it's kind of cool for for me having been there, but also people who dream about going to that part of the country, places like the crystal beer parlor and the type sign, the landmark lighthouse, pizza, especially the Sunday cafe, and I'm not going to say anything, but that has seen in the Sunday cafe. It's how do you decide what you'll put in there? That is it just come to you as your writing. It just happens. You know it is. Setting is really important to me and to my all my books. I want much. I want to put the reader right in my story. I want them to feel the humidity on their skin and I want them to smell...

...the marsh mud, the pluff it's called. I want. I want them to see the Spanish moss hanging from the trees and I want them to hear palm fronds rustling in the wind at night. And the physical, the physical setting is important too. So I wrote about some places and Savanna that you know, people know about. Crystal Beer Parlor's been around, I think, since of s and that's where my cop, me Carowitz. I have a great I love this cop and he's named Fam he's named after a family friend, Alan mccarrowitz, who was not a cop. But mcrowitz meets with laniar Reagan's daughter. When lannear disappeared seventeen years ago, she left behind her four year old daughter and her daughter's been searching for answers ever since. So they meet at the crystal beer parlor. They meet in a in a square, a downtown square where the pigeons are very aggressive. They have coffee. Hattie and her friend CASS have coffee at Foxy Loxy, which is a favorite haunt in downtown savannah. And then the tide be the Tyde hot spots. You know, there's only, I think, two pizza places on the island time. He's tiny. It's like a mile long at that. So you know Lighthouse Pizza and choose is the convenience store where everybody goes to get their beer and there and their smokes. And Sunday cafe is, you know, the nicest restaurant on the island and we've had lots and lots of good dinners at Sunday cafe. It's our our family's favorite spot and I thought, well, that's where Hattie and trey. He's trying, he's making a hard effort to seduce Hattie. She's not quite sure whether she wants that to happen or night, but it's fun for her to be pursued. She does admit that. So they have a dinner at Sunday cafe and the scene where some of Trey's fans are eaves dropping on them and actually photographing them. I had some I've had something like that happened while we were at dinner at Sunday cafe. People you know, not that I'm famous or anything, but people on the island know there's a writer who writes about this place. So more than once we've been having dinner at Sunday cafe and people have come over and said, oh, are you the rider? Can we take our pictures with you? Or one time we were sitting at dinner and the people on that table behind us we're talking about me. Oh nicely, they were. They were sings. You know she wrote this book. So I turn around and I said, you know, I can hear you. They must died. I want to take I want to put my readers, even if it's a place that I've made up. I want to put my readers in in the moment of the book, and you do that so well with this and now all of your writing. It's just so atmospheric and you really pull people in. So, in addition to the places and the settings, you also drop little Easter eggs with people's names and and things that you do. You mentioned the police officers and the where that came from, but you've done like the Patti's, Patty Henry's son, Christine Harvey. Yeah, I have a fictional television couple who are those stars of this fictional network, will and Christie. Only I'm spelled Christie's name with a why, just so she won't get mad at me because I described the real will that I know is not does not have the personality of Brussels sprouts. But no, but the will and that Christian will. It's not what you would call a spectacularly fascinating God. No, I can't even remember all the Easter eggs I putting in there. I'll be searching for a name and I'll just think to myself, I will, I'll drop Blah...

Blah in there and sometimes I forget I've done it until you know someone will come up to me at a signing and say hey, you put Bah Blah in the book and I'm like, Oh yeah, I don't remember that. It's like, Oh, yeah, I did, yes, I did, I did. I mean my children, my grandchildren have been in books. It's fun. It is fun. It's fun to read too, because I like boom and I thought there was a little plan words with the initial name for the show called Survi. Was it called Saving Savannah? Yes, savings of Hannah. It's good. I love it. So this is just a little bit of a general question, but this book, like many of your others, really features strong women in nontraditional jobs and they just feel that they're exactly where they belong. But tell me why you think it's really still important to talk about women's strength in the stories. You know, I write about southern women. I've never lived outside the south and I hope my right I hope my books appeal to people all over the country, all over the world. I need I need a character who's come through the fire, who have have had bad stuff happened to them and who have had to pick themselves up and reinvent themselves and how do. He has had to do that on more than one occasion. You know, her family has basically dissolved and she goes and lives with her best friends family and then she marries the love of her life and his his life is tragically cut short in a traffic accident and she has to figure out a way to keep going. But not, you know, she's not start so strong that she doesn't have a lot of things to overcome and and she's not so strong that she doesn't make mistakes. She does. We I mean I want my characters. I don't want cardboard to dimensional characters. So Haddie, yeah, had he's had a struggle and her friend, she in her late husband were fixing up a house of their own, their first house that they bought together, when he's killed and her friends says, the clocks all stopped when Hank died at your house. Nothing, you know, the kitchen, they said. They have started working on the kitchen and that just as left that way. And and I think we've all known people who have had those kinds of sudden tragedies and the clock stops, and it does. It's so good place to start from in the book though, too, because they the tragedy there and then everything after that is is moving forward, to gaining strength and finding their way in a new, new normal. Right. So we haven't talked yet about thirty. You've been in the business for thirty years. This is your thirty novel and some would say this is a quintessential Mary Ca Andrews Book because it kind of goes back to your mystery roots. Also a beach book. You get the heroine that you want to root for, you get the beach setting, you get the of stories, but I'm in this one. You get all home Rehnato stuff that fit your fans love so much they follow you like so it really seems to have it all and it's very fitting that this is your s book and if it were a coffee, would be called the prime mka blend. You've been doing this writing thing for a while now. Are you ready to jump in into it full time yet? Well, you know, if it works out, I might. I might put my big toe in it and seeing, you know, see what happens. I'll quit my day job. We actually did thirty one years ago, against everyone's advised, by the way. Oh really, we'll come. That turned out well. You know, I was writing in secret. I was working at full time as a newspaper reporter at the Atlanta Constitution. Two young kids, my husband and I had not one but two mortgages on our house and I started trying to tunnel out of newspapers. So I started writing in secret at night and when I sold my first book,...

I said to my editor, well, now I could quit my job and he said no, no, no, don't do that, don't do that. You know, you should just keep you know, don't, don't quit your day job. Kid and my husband did not want me to quit my day job. It was, you know, is security. I had benefits, all those things, but I just it was time to go and lots of people told me not to do it, but I guess I don't listen very well. Well, sometimes that's the right path to take. Wellpen that or institutionalization for me. Oh No, yeah, I don't think we'd want to know that one, that version of you. Noah. So it's serious. Just so, what do you think is changed the most over these thirty years since you've been the spot, like good and bad in publishing? Well, firstly, everything has changed. I mean, for one thing, the advent of digital books, e readers. When I first started out, every year or so somebody would say, Oh, they've rembetted this new thing. It's a it's an e reader and it's this big clunky thing you you haul around and that's going to be the new way of the future. And I can remember saying yeah, yeah, yeah, that is never ever going to happen. But then it happened so fast it sort of took everybody's breadth away. That has changed dramatically and of course that the advent of social media, where you are instantly available twenty four hours a day to your readers, your fans, your enemies, your everyone. And you know, the publishing business itself has has shrunk. You know, there were thirty years ago there were probably ten big time New York publishers, and now that's down to five. They've they've merged and some of them have disappeared. So that has changed dramatically. The nut, you know, it used to be when I started out there were four national chains. There was barns and nobles boarders or the other two, Walden books and be Dalton, and each of those were smaller versions of either boarders or Barnes and noble. Now borders has been gone for five or six years. Those others, smaller national chains have gone away. Now there's still books a million and for a long time we were terrified that independent book stores would go by the way. But the one good thing I can see in the past couple years is that Indie book stores who I have such a I have such a loyalty to because they were the ones who championed my books in the beginning. They were the ones who would nobody had ever heard of Cathy Trochek said Hey, we like your books. Why don't you come and do as signing in Minneapolis? Or why don't you come and do a signing in boulder, Colorado at a mystery bookstore? And so you know, I've seen a lot of treasured indies go under, but it's great so many indies have found out how to navigate this new normal and how to reach out through social media and put books in the hands of readers, which is what we're all about. Yes, and I think it's a great testament also to all of you writers who have been lifting them up and partnering with them to offer signed copies of your book, because I think so that kind of thing is what helped get people through the pandemic. I think it was really a treasure and there's just a renewed love of these indie book stores. That's just you know, we're ut yeah, we're a mutual aid society. They need us and we need them right. I don't want to see the world run by one giant conglomerate. No, no, wouldn't think anybody wants to see that. Nobody wants that. So if it's okay, I think that people probably would like to hear from you about how you're doing. You've had a terrible year and I know a lot of people care about you and hopefully you using your work and keeping your nose the grindstone to keep going forward, because you, like your characters, are a very strong woman and very impressed...

...by how you have handled everything. But how's it going? You know, we're taken a day by day. For those who don't know, my daughter, Katie died of complications of covid in February. She was fully baxed and boosted and but she had an underlying liver condition that no one knew about. She went into liver failure and we thought she was going to be a liver, a good candidate for a liver transplant and then she got covid again a second time and just couldn't beat it. So we're taking it one day at a time. People have been amazing. I've gotten so many cards and letters, mass cards, miraculous metals, ice cream, Gelato, comfort foods and sweet cards, and note so her children, my grandchildren, lived just around the corner. Their ten and twelve, and so that's the focus of what we're concerned with. And they have my son and mom. Mark is a great guy and his folks are gray and supportive. So and the kids school is amazing and that the you know, this community of readers and fans have been so sweet and so supportive and of course my friends and fiction family had been amazing. They all came down to Atlanta to help out. They've all got put in on kitchen duty. It's okay. We had a big open house after the after Katie's celebration of life, and they ended up in the kitchen making deviled eggs and filling plates and doing all the things and and you know that that's the sign of really good friends. Exactly. Yes, and I wouldn't have expected anything else from them. But just in case anybody is wondering, there's been some great outpouring of support for organizations and even a scholarship fund for your grandchildren. That if people just go to your social media they can learn more about it and participate if they feel like it and do it. Yes, do it for Katie, but also if there's anybody in your life who's been affected by all of this thing, that you could do it in honor of them too, because I think anything we do is just really important and really helpful to others. Yeah, Katie was passionate about helping people. She worked and volunteered for an organization Atlanta called the free fridges. That it's a mutual aid society. You just fix meals and put them in in the these frigerators all over town and people can take what they want. There's no paperwork and you can. You can look on my social media. There's a way to contribute monetarily to their wich list. There's a great or organization and they have them around the country, called helping Mama's that helps out women in need with diapers, formula, baby food, period products. No Kid hungry. So you know, and really we've just said, do something kind right, just do some find yes, leave that there. So this switch will just a little bit. And can you tell people what you are working on now? I am working on well, getting ready to go on book tour. That yes, that's true. I've started working on another Christmas book. I got the idea, Gosh, back in the fall when Katie was sick, actually writing help take my mind off the worries. So I started working on a book. It's about a woman whose family owns a Christmas tree farm in the same North Carolina town where the Santa suit was set and she and her brother go to New York City and set up a Christmas tree stand in Greenwich Village and they sell Christmas trees. The family's been doing this for thirty years, but this year my character, whose name is Carrie, gets recruited to go to and so they live in a camp or on a street corner in in Greenwich, in the West Village, and they sell Christmas trees and you know, things happen. There's a mystery man and it's it's fun and I've, you know, done some research on growing Christmas trees and we'll say that will be Christmas twenty three right. I cannot wait and I know...

...there's lots of other readers who can'ts as well. So you are about to embark on a kind of a ambitious tour. Yeah, you've got to go a lot of places. Yeah, I'm and including Clei want. Yes, indeed, friends and fiction, the full gang will be on tour in a couple of stops coming up. So, yeah, the main here in Cleveland. Yeah, WE'LL BE IN CLEVELAND WITH RON and Ron you're coming to Mentisquan, New Jersey to right. I am, I am. So I'll be joining you there. Yeah, so they can find. People can find all the details of my book tour, where I'm going to be and all that stuff on my website and on my social media, Mary K Andrewscom. They can see photos of what I'm doing, my foebos and my fake ancestors and my junking fines and right now is sort of relentless self promotion for the new book. Well, that's part of the game now and I think that's one of the things is probably changed in thirty years. It's a lot of it falls on you and your own team. Oh yeah, I mean I when I started out, you know, your publisher would ask the books the bookstore would maybe put an ad in the newspaper and maybe they would get a notice in the town's newspaper calendar about coming events. But that was about it for publicity for a book tour or a book signing. And maybe the bookstore, if is big enough, had a newsletter that literally a a physical newsletter that went out. If you are lucky, when you went out of town, maybe a media escort would pick you up at the airport and take you to the television station or the newspaper for interviews. None of that happens anymore. There actually was a library event recently where there was a media escort and I was like, it's like a dinosaur came in the door. It was bad. I hadn't seen them in years. Yeah, nowadays it's me and my and ways on my phone and then the little tiny gram one. Last year we had a, I think a Kia that we called the smerfmobile. Yeah, get you there. Yeah. So congratulations on the book again and I know that you're adoring fans are going to eat this one up. It's really, really quintessential Maryk Andrews and it's just so good. So congratulations well, thank you, Ron. I hope I'll see lots of folks out on the book tour trail. Absolutely well, you know what that I adore you, and everybody that's listening is going to want to gobble the book up. It does exceed reader expectations. It's basically it's a hell of an accomplishment of thirty years. Thirty years, the thirty novels. I know, I can't believe I'm old enough to have written thirty novels. I know, but, as we all know, you're really just getting started. So thanks so much for being here with me today. Book is out this week and, to quote Mary Kay, buy my book, Damn It. Absolutely. Thanks her on thank you all for tuning in for a new episode of the friends and Fiction Writers Block podcast. It's truly my honor to represent Mary K, Patti, Kristen and Christie and I can't wait for more. If you're enjoying the podcast, please tell a friend. Thank you to our presenting sponsor, Charleston Coffee Roasters, for their generous support. Show our sponsors some love by following them on facebook and instagram and subscribing to their email newsletter. Remember to use the code coffee with friends for twenty percent off bagged coffees at Charleston Coffee roasters. Thank you for tuning in to the friends and fiction writers block podcast. Please be sure to subscribe, rate and review on your favorite podcast platform. Tune in every Friday for another episode, and you can also join us every week...

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