Friends & Fiction
Friends & Fiction

Episode · 1 year ago

Friends & Fiction with William Kent Krueger

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bestselling, award-winning author William Kent Krueger joins the Fab Five to talk about his novel THIS TENDER LAND. They each discuss their rituals after handing in a manscript, the influences of Huck Finn and The Odyssey on Kent's latest work, and how his study of childhood resiliency has informed his writing. https://williamkentkrueger.com/

Welcome to Friends and a fiction fivebest selling authors and the stories novelist Mary Kay Andrews, ChristineHarmel, Christie Woodson, Harvey, Patty Callahan Henry and Mary Alice Munro arefive longtime friends with more than 80 published books. To their credit. In2020 they created friends and fiction to provide author interviews andfascinating insider talk about publishing and writing and to highlightindependent bookstores. These friends discussed the books they've written,the books they're reading now and the art of storytelling. If you love booksand you're curious about the writing world, you're in the right place. Goodevening and welcome to Friends and fiction. Tonight we are all prayingwith peace and hope across our great nation. Friends and fiction is a placeof refuge for us, and we hope it is the new two. I'm Mary Alice Munro, and I'mdelighted to be your host. Tonight I upcoming novel is The Summer of Bostonfound I mean not Made in Heaven and I'm Mary Kay Andrews, and my forthcomingnovel is the newcomers out. May 4th. I'm Christine Harmel, and my next novelis The Forest of Vanishing stars out July 6th. I'm Christi Woodson Harvey,and my next book is Under the Southern Sky, releasing April 20th and last butnot least, I am Paddy Callaghan Henry, and my next novel is surviving Savannahin exactly eight weeks way. We've been looking forward to tonight to welcomethe award winning author William Kent Krueger. A few announcements, let'sbegin by announcing, are highlighted. Independent producer. We have a cue. The bookstore coming upwith it is called the Once Upon a Crime, and it is located in Minnesota. Andmany of you may not know that William Kent Krueger is also author of an awardwinning this spring, Siri's Park O'Connor mysteries. That's also said inMinnesota, So it's no surprise that his trust that would be a bookstore thatfocuses on once upon a crime primarily stocks mystery fiction. And if you lovemysteries, they'll work with you to find that book you're searching for.But if you want to order a non mystery, they can order that, too, and shippeddirectly to you. And tonight, Once Upon a Crime is offering 10% off of WilliamKent. Krueger is books including Ordinary Grace and This tender land, aswell as the recent and upcoming novels of the Fab Five, the five of us authorshere and as a bonus, can't live near the store. So if you'd like a signedcopy, let them know that when you order the link is on our Facebook page underannouncements it and our presenting sponsor tonight for our show is MamaGeraldine's traditional Southern snacking. They're offering 20% off oforders with the code Fab Five on. That is a deal you were not gonna want tomiss out on. I did want to mention I know a couple of you had some problemswith the shipping price last week that has been all fixed on. I think if youpaid extra shipping, they have refunded you also. But if you went last week andyou thought, Oh, my goodness, the shipping is really high Go back becauseyou're gonna wanna have these treats. My personal favorite is the consummateease, but the cheese straws air also to die for thank you. And now to theperson we are all eager to me. William Kent Krueger is the celebrated awardwinning author of The New York Times bestseller Ordinary Grace and hislatest best selling novel, This Tender Land. It is also the author of The longrunning court O'Connor, Mr Siris, for which is one multiple avoids, includingback to back Anthony Words, the coveted Edgar Award Mystery Writers of Americaand the good reads Choice Aboard For the Street and Phillips. I Love ThisOffice Bio, and I took It Right from his website. Susan Williams at Krogerbriefly attended Stanford University before being kicked out for radicalactivities. After that, he logged Timber. Don't you love values? Love himfor that alone. After that, he logged timber. He worked construction. Hetried his hand freelance journalism and eventually ended up researching childdevelopment at the University of Minnesota. He currently makes hisliving as a full time off. He's been married for over 40 years to awonderful, marvelous woman was retired a tuning. He makes his home in ST Paulthat he really loved. He may claim he doesn't have a degree yet his novel toreflect a scholarship in the cost. Several great now tips are mentionedwhen discussing this land. Virgil's...

...odyssey with the stories Epic journey,Charles Dickens and Inequality and Abusive Boys in School on Steinbeck brings to mind thedesperate poverty Depression era. Mark Twain with Huckleberry Finn and thevagabonds adventure about Mississippi River. Sinclair Lewis's Elmer Gantryreligious revival Finally, L. Frank Baum's The Visit of Eye On That'spretty heady company, and it explains why this tender land has the feel ofclass it Waas. And I'm honest about this. It was my favorite book. So it's for me a really great pleasureintroduced William Can't Kruger. Thank you so much for having me. Yea, havinghearing your thank you really, truly love your books. And I'm sure ifeveryone out there who hasn't read it yet, Is there anyone out there whohasn't You will thio. Well, in the past few weeks, most of us here havefinished in hand and into our publishers, publishers in the novel,and finishing a novel is followed by all of us with this great sigh ofrelief. So what I'm asking all of you, including you can't can you share whatyou do after you push send and is it harder for you to send in the unediteddraft to your editor knowing edits are coming or in the final past pages,knowing you won't be able to work on it any longer. E don't know about all ofyou, but for me, it's a never ending process. E until I actually have thefinished product in my hand. You know, everything is up to grab eso when Ihave finished the first draft of the novel. Typically, I'll try to set itaside for a while so that I can come back to it a bit later with a French erI, um Then I'll send the manuscript off to my agent for her comments, goesthrough revisions. Then I send it to my editor for his comments. It goesrevision when I sent, Then I get the copy edited manuscript addressed all ofthose. And then finally those final the the first past pages and second pastpages come have to be honest with you. By the time I get the second past pages,I'm pretty tired. A soon as I have finished all of that process, I have tomove onto the next project. I don't know about you. I feel so at sea if I'mnot actually at work. Well, that's interesting. That really is. But youdon't give yourself in a horde like today I'm gonna by myself in your ballcap or something. E have a whole collection of ball caps that havenothing in writing. It's all because underneath there, there is this reallyshiny of ball hate that is, with the camera life. Where where? E By goingout and buying a few donuts and chocolate milk. Actually e love thatyou're walking the Ron Howard look z a good luck. Yeah, that's very sexy. Welike them or anybody else want to confess what they do when they pushedsend, which they prefer? Well, I celebrate sending it in the first,finishing it and sending the first draft off. I don't do multiple dress. Ifinished the book. Then I sent it to my agent in my editor simultaneously and Ialways celebrate with the same thing which is re C cups. And when I and whenI can get my hands on it, wink grapefruit, soda e Don't distributewink in Georgia where I lived, they did when I lived in North Carolina. Butyeah, recent cups is how I celebrate. Then I'm like you. Can I go right? It'syou know, Plus, I think all of us air. We're on a fast track. We're all on a Ithink we're all year schedule. So there's there's there's really no timeto go out and buy ball caps. I'm sorry. E need a new celebration ritual. Iclean my office. I left the wing way better. Usually by the time those lastfirst past pages are sent in my office...

Looks like a bomb went off in itbecause I've ignored everything. So there's this great flurry of I'm goingto clean it up. Um but yeah, and then immediately, because usually I thinkall of you all to there's been something brewing, right. It's been onthat back burner and you've been thinking so a soon as they're handed inand it's never the end when you hand them in. But you know you want to jumpin. Yeah. You know, I feel like by the time the first pass or the final pastpages come to you, months have elapsed from the time you turned in your firstdraft and then you're at it like time has passed. And if you weren't writingin the meantime, you've now wasted a few months on your next book, sort of,or at least on the next idea. So, honestly, by the time I'm doing finalpast pages, I feel like, Oh, no, this is kind of taking me away from theworking hands Like the work I'm really feeling about now. Yeah, yeah E feelthat exact same way. And I have this thing Where before I have a book handedin, I have to be at least like 10,000 words into my next manuscript. Arestart getting kind of panicky because I'm like, I'll never have another idea.They'll never be another back like so I have to kind of take a step back andwork for a little bit. But I think for me, it's much more nerve wracking tosend in that first draft than it is to send the final one. Because by thefinal one, e feel like I've gotten enough people's opinions that like it'sprobably not just terrible, you know, like that many people cannot have readit, and it be just terrible. So I think it's, but they both come with their ownsense of sort of challenges. Christie. It's the opposite for me, like afterI've hit send on those final past pages, I will literally be woken up in themiddle of the night by nightmares that I've missed, like one word that Itranslated incorrectly or one detail wrong. That's gonna ruin the entirebook. And now it's too late to fix it, e acknowledged. E. I have to remindthis week I'm so panicked now and I'll wake up with the cold sweat there likeeveryone's going to hate it and it's full. And I mean, I definitely have allof that, but I think the the knowing that there's something about knowingthat it's just out of your hands. To me that's different than knowing all thework that's about to come. I get that follows when you turn it in and it'sbeing prepared for. Production is I don't know about you is the worry aboutOkay, So what are people going to think of this? What is the way of this? And Ihave Ah, I have to admit I'm impressed. 80 books between U E. I only have 20. Ifeel like a slack. Well, way wouldn't have invited you. And you only had 20.You're outta mistakes way 20 Timberland is 2020 20. I think it's 20 even 20maybe 21. I'm not sure. Lucky Number 21 e both read this tender land, and Ilistened to the audiobook is back to your friends and fiction. I raved aboutthe audio. I think that's a really great narration. So will you pleasegive our viewers a brief summary of this epic tale, this tender land? Sothe Stender Landis set in the summer of 1932 during the Great Depression. It'sthe story of four orphans from the walking A a terrible crime, but for theright reason, they know if they take to the roads to get away, they're gonna becaught rather quickly because a huge manhunt has been launched to capturethem. They're afraid to ride the rails, as everybody was doing back in theDepression, because the railroads back then were patrolled by private copscalled bulls, and the bulls had a reputation for being incredibly cruel.So so the kids decide instead Thio to take to the rivers. They canoe a rivercalled the Gilead to the Minnesota. They could do the Minnesota River tothe Mississippi and their plan is to canoe all the way down the MississippiRiver to ST Louis, where they believe they have family and they'll be safe.I've always wanted to write an updated version of Huckleberry Finn. This is myblueberry. You did it for sure. I say that. I see that. Yeah, well, I think Ihope you all can hear. Um, this is the part of the show where we get to askyou questions on. I've listened to a lot of the interviews and you alwayshave such great answers. So I'll start. Can you all hear? I know that you, mygreat so can't what a bunch of...

...vagabonds you created with this group.You have Odysseus or OD the clever, cunning body than his brother Albert,who's being mechanical whiz and kind of the boy in charge responsible. And Ilove most the native Indian whose voiceless about the name our familyunable to speak and Little Emmy who everyone loves and she is a seer. So II'm big Dickins fans, as everyone knows, and this is like the Children inDickens's books. These Children endured really harsh, unspeakable Lincoln intoChinese school and during their journey all along the Gilead, they were treatedharshly. There were quite scary moments. So I'd like to have you discussed howthe Children shared this trauma that united them and how they also had thisshared vision or idea of home. And how close to the addicts. And did youreally stick as you wrote this? Now, um, several questions in there. Um, let'stake the Odyssey question first. The Odyssey was where my thinking began. Ehave tried to write a couple of times across. My my career is a writer, andand I was never able to sink my teeth into the story. I have to tell youhonestly, this is a story I wanted to write. Since I was 11 years old, I was11. That would have been in the fifth grade. Our teacher read to the classthe adventures of Tom Sawyer. She did it by reading our after lunch every day.I love that book. Here was this kid and he was just like me. And it was outthere on the Mississippi River having this really great adventures. And ofcourse, after that I had to read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which Iloved even more on DSO. Ever since then, really, I wanted to write a story thatwould pay homage to Mark Twain. That might be, as I said, in a way, anupdated version of Huckleberry Finn. Uh, but I When I tried to write it, Icouldn't sink my teeth into it because I didn't know the structure. My fatherwas a high school English teacher, and when I was quite young, instead ofreading, you know, the Hardy Boys and Nancy through, he had me reading TheIliad and The Odyssey never cared much for the Elliot. But I love the Odyssey.And so the idea came to me, Um, why not use the structure that Homer used inthe in the Odyssey? And and then I began to envision a story in sectionsin which each section would be an adventure that these vagabonds wouldhave that would mirror an experience that Odysseus had in his long journeyfrom Troy back to Ithaca. And that's really when the story began. Thio cometogether. Um, let's see, what else did you ask me? Oh, myself about the trauma and Ireally think you earlier Children education. You must think about thingsright, Thank you for because nobody has ever asked me this before. But one ofthe things that I studied the lab in which I worked, studied at theUniversity of Minnesota. The Institute of Child Development was resilience inChildren and what we found. Children are incredibly resilient, given theproper support. And so what happened across the course of the summer forthese for vagabonds is create family and the family becomes their supportand they love one another and care about one another. And that's whatgains them and gives them the resilience that allows them to dealwith all of the harsh circumstances that come their way. I love that answer. It really makes it.It really rings true for me. Thank you Can't. One of my favorite characters inthis tender land was most the mute Indian represented the Native American,the voiceless. Could you tell us more about the rial effort of culturalgenocide? It in the United States the real effect of cultural genocide in US,including the off reservation boarding schools for Native Americans thatinspired the London's the Lincoln School? I think that for me, was, Youknow, as Mary Alice said a really Dickens ian institution. Yeah, verymuch. So, Um, I won't go way back because a lotof this history, everybody knows we really as a za nation of Europeanimmigrants, did our best to eradicate all of the indigenous people who werehere because we moved farther and farther west, we pushed them fartherand farther west than if if we didn't push them, we did our best to kill them.Really? That's the truth. Um, and, uh, and when all of that didn't work in inin the end, what they did waas because they couldn't they couldn't do it anyother way. In the end, they came for the Children. And that's what theNative American boarding school system...

...was all about was, although so that theNative American boarding school system began in the late 18 eighties. It wasthe brainchild of a guy named Colonel Henri Richard prouder Richard HenryPratt. Andi convinced the federal government to allow him to open aboarding school for Native American boys in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and thegovernment considered it such a successful endeavor that they beganopening up other boarding schools across the country following the theformat that Pratt adopted Prats Kratz idea was this. Kill the Indian, Savethe man. His belief, you know, I have to believe really thought it was asincere effort to help the native people. His belief was is that the onlyhope for the native people was to fully in incorporate them into white culture.And that's what the Native American boarding schools were meant to do intruth, what they turned out being. They were supposed to train native Childrento become productive members of our society. And in truth, what they turnedout to be was free labor for local farmers and and other people thinkeducation was poor. The nutrition was poor, the conditions were horrible.Onda punishments for speaking their language of practicing the religionwere horrific. Eso yeah, and and that lasted for almost 100 years. Theboarding school system for 100 years of American parents and the governmentcame and said, We're taking your Children away, and we're gonna cut themoff to a native to a boarding school hundreds of miles away, and you won'tsee them for a while. Or maybe never There was nothing you could say law.Until 1978 when the National Indian Child Welfare Act was passed, that wasthe law that is just being powerless is the powerlessness of these kids, Ithink is a is a recurring is a recurring thread through through thisnarrative. And I love the fact that it's on Lee when they lead that schoolthat they find their own power. Yeah, you know, he always he's alwayspushing back. Yeah, yeah, but he never gives up. He really has it in for theBlack Witch. Yeah, the black, which was really great. I mean, that's what kidswould have seen her as a witch. You kept the kids. That's one of the thingsI love, too, is you kept the mindset of the kids in the first. They weren'tadults in kids bodies, they were kids. And they had the kids fears, which Ireally loved. And I was right along with them on the journey. Good. Oh,good. I think that the when I first was reading about the Lincoln School, I washoping you had made that up about our history, and I went and looked it upand realized that you hadn't so another one of the themes that runs through thebook A Rivers, Rivers. The River is a really deep metaphor in this novel.I've poems about them and photos them all over my office. I'm obsessed withthe rivers and this line in your book Speak so much to me. You say there is ariver that runs through time and the universe vast and inexplicable. Ah,flow of spirit that is the heart of all existence. So I want to know about yourhistory with Rivers and why you chose this river. And if you knew, it wouldbe a metaphor for the whole story. Oh, don't we all? As as writers love riversbecause they're metaphor, so many things. Andi, in this tender land.Certainly it's a metaphor for the Children's journey to the discovery ofwhat's important to reach them on finding that it's a metaphor for, um,the journey and creating family. It's a metaphor for have the spiritual journeythat certainly odious on um, I grew up on Rivers and rivers have always justhold this mysterious appeal for me. Eso if you read the companion novel to thistender land is the novel called Ordinary Grace. The river plays asignificant role in that as well. I may never write a significant novel goingforward without putting a big river hard. Uh oh. Patty's gonna love that.Yeah, tell me there's a river in it. Put a river in the title. And you likeThio. You actually went on the river in your canoe. You said, Yeah, I don'tknow about all of you, but I try never to write about a place or an experience.I haven't had myself. With the exception of the murders in the CorkO'Connor's Theo E. You know, when I I knew I was gonna have these kids on therivers. I'm a canoeists and that that's...

...one of the things I love aboutMinnesota. Great. Great area for Canadian. Uh um, But I canoe primarilylakes, but I wanted to get out there on the river so I could feel what the kidswere feeling. I wanted to know what what they smelled and what made themafraid all of those things. So, yeah, I got on a kayak and I kayaked MinnesotaRiver, and then my wife and I together canoed that section of the Mississippithat the kids canoe in the story. Uh, that's a section Well, and, uh, and STPaul is a very busy The Mississippi River is very busy in Saint Paul, it'sheavy barge traffic. And in the wake of all of these big barges, there arethese huge, you know, waves these huge weights. So two or three times, whilemy wife and I were doing, I was sure we're gonna get swap A. But you knowthat the book spoiler, he did not. Unless this is the ghost of Williamcan't you know, you can always tell when a writer really was in the in thewater, on the land, you can always tell. And it was so vivid. Well done. Okay,so, you know, I spent a lot of fun in Southern Minnesota. Uh, one because Ilove the area into just soak up all of the details that make it come to life.But there's a thing in this story in which Tony O'Banion says a kiss with mybest associate with results in love with On a Rock on the hillside I sat onthat lock e loved that e thank you for sharing. That s o Can you mentionedjust a moment ago, the Siris of mystery novels you wrote before you decided towrite your first? Or was it your first standalone novel, Ordinary Grace? Wasthat your first stand alone or had 1/4 published novel? Was what in thebusiness we call a standalone thriller. It was a political okay, Nothing likeordinary grace of this gender land. So what? What what made you switch genres?What brought you from the decision to shift from a very successful awardwinning mystery? Siri's to writing a literary masterpiece. Basically, howdid your publisher respond? And, um, what was sort of the reactioninternally And what was the thought process when I proposed the idea of theordinary grades for my public because I didn't want it told me that the NewYork City and kind of a panic and set me down in 10 minutes one focused on anovel Come here. E knew it could be a risky proposition. I wrote thatmanuscript not under contract. E spoke to the intestine telling the way that Iknew I had Thio had to write it for across the course of the next few years.Every minute that wasn't voted for contractual obligation of micro funnystory has spent composing the manuscript for ordinary today. Now theyEven though they didn't want it, I would have to send it to my editor, 76there when it's been a little bit, uh, published that they did Northern Racistjust have this sort of remarkable reception from critics and readersalike. Uh, one times of awards when it came out. It's been translated intomore than 2000 foreign languages. Um, somebody told really million copy. Sowhat it did was open the door for me. Oh, good for you. That's remarkable. Thathave kind of followed your heart into the kind of book you want to write thatzone. Incredible way to kind of guide the ship of your own career. And cancan you just tell briefly? Also, that was the success of ordinary Grace, Andthen you're going to write a follow up to it. That's a good story. Can youshare that with us? Sure. So when my publisher saw how well ordinary gracewas doing, but did they want another book? Just like, uh, tell us and whatnot to do until we do it right? Exactly. That's so true. So I signed a contractfor a companion novel. They gave me a shitload of money on uh and I spent thenext two years writing what I thought would be the companion novel that thatmanagement was contractually due to my public for five years ago. Two monthsbefore that contractual deadline, I set up a meeting in Chicago. We talked tomy agent about revisions to the peace because there were problems with thatand you see me with two days before we got together. I sent her a note saying,When we meet, I don't want to talk about how we devised this piece. I wantto talk about how we stupid from being published, because it wasn't the storyI thought it would be. I didn't know how to make it that story, e u. Mypublisher turned out to be really understanding. They said, Fine, youdon't have to give us this manuscript, but you still owe us a companion novel.So here's the deal with what was going on, and maybe you've experienced thistoo. The expectations for that follow up novel were enormous on the wholetime I was trying to write, the story just got crushed by the weight of allthose expectations, Really, what I was...

...doing when I was writing it was tryingto meet everybody else's expectations instead of writing the point that spoketo me from my heart. But as soon as all that weight got lifted off my shouldersand I felt free again, E was also clearly the story. I should have beenwriting that story that spoke to me since I was 11 years old. Wow, that'swhat I wanted you to tell. I love that story. It z clearly to all all authors.I think you know za story. I like telling younger writers because, youknow, there's so many voices out there telling you what you ought to bewriting, what's gonna sell? What's hot that e tell younger writers. The onlyvoice you should be listening to is the one that speaks to you from your heart.Yeah, well, and that's a really perfect Segway into my question, Ken. So thankyou for that. But spiritualism is such another really important player in thisnovel. The nature of God as well as the character's relationship with God hasbig consequences. For example, ODIs, Tornado, God, Sister Eaves forgivingGod. And then there were the Sears, which was one of the most fascinatingparts of this book to me, Sister Eve could touch a hand and know theperson's history and their greatest fear young Emmys fits could deliver hera vision of the future and possibly a means to alter the future. Can youdiscuss the roles of God and Sears on this epic journey? And you alsorevealed that your own there was a seer. Can you tell us about her? Sure. Um,you know, I have. Ah, when I created them is the seer. I knew they weregonna be certain readers. That would go give me a break. Uh, because theydidn't grow up the way I grew up. Uh, yeah. I grew up in a house where my mom,my mother, was the sear. It was when I was a kid for the telephone ring, andshe would say, um, there's trouble with Angela. An and sure enough, uh, tossedand turned in bed for Silverlight. Since you would say something's goingto happen, and it's not gonna be cool if something would happen and it wasn'tgood, so s. So it wasn't difficult for me. I have to tell you a little bitabout me. And he came late to my thinking is a vagabond I had initiallycreated here simply to be a daughter for Cora Frost because I thought coreFrost was a woman who would have a daughter like Emmy. But the more Iwrote the moment vote scenes with her in it, the more fell in love with her.And when it came time for the vagabonds Thio leave the school, I thought, Oh,crap, They're gonna leave her a do that. So trying to give her a part to playand I decided I was gonna make her t o um again. Part of the reason for thatwas just that when I was when I was a kid. Among the many things that myfather had me read were three epic journeys he wrote in heroin. And so oneof the things I remember this that on many of the journeys that a heroheroine takes, he or she is accompanied by a senior somebody can look into thefuture and offer advice whether it's taken or not. So I made. I mean, like,here. I just thought that was absolutelyincredible. And I think it's really hard to do that in the novel, becauseit's like you said, You know, people in order to make that believable. You know,when you see it in real life and you experience it in real life, it sort oftakes your breath away. But to be able to put that on a page could be really,really difficult. Yeah, e if I have just a moment, let me tell you this.Yeah, yeah. What? When? When this tender land came out, I did a readingin a book store. I won't tell you what the bookstore was or where it waas. Butthe bookseller at the end, when everybody cleared out, she called meover into an isolated I'll just just her and me. And she said, I have totell you, I absolutely believe Tell me, because I have seen visions all my life.Uh, it has been a difficult thing for me all my life. Um uh, And then sheshared some of the difficulties with me, and I'm thinking it would be so. Hereis not necessarily a good thing. Yeah, it's a great responsibility. I'm sure.It's also of responsibility to hear that story is, Well, you know, that wasa confidence. Yeah. Blessing. That's right, Mary Kay. Well, thank you forladies for asking your questions. And now we get to get questions from ourviewers. And we pulled a few questions from our Facebook page from our members.And if you're watching now, please leave a few questions and the lifeleads. So, Christian, why don't you begin asking a question from them? Yeah.Kent and Parks Lin would like to know are the Cork O'Connor mysteries basedon real events or true stories? Um, many of them are based on truesituations. Um used important elements off our culture here in Minnesota tocreate the story. So I have written about Native American. Uh, you know, infact, that that's had both on the subway population around the whitepopulation, written about the ongoing battle we have here in Minnesota overhunting and fishing treaty rights...

...written about really bad situation thatexists here in the Twin Cities and in many large studies with a significantdata population that involves the sexual trafficking. Ah, vulnerable name,uh, women and Children. So I often use a real situation and create a storyaround that so that I can present this issue to a readership that may or maynot be aware of it. But but try to inform them in a way that at least getsthem thinking about it. Yeah. Hey, Patty. Yes, well, I'm sitting herenodding like pork. Siri's. I just I just think it's fascinating that youcould write these mysteries Siri's and dive into being kind of events of, ofdeath and and mystery, and then write this tender a bigger and I'm like,Where's your twin brother? What's going on? That is not the question. Jump onthat per second patty, because actually, you brought up a really good point whenyou're writing your way when you are on, Are you a book a year for yourmysteries? Or do you? What is? You have to put your epic novel in between thatStop. You do? Yeah, like most, uh, sense, I would say most writers in mygenre the mystery, John, but it sounds like in your area to book of years.Commercial speed. That's what you're expect you to deliver. So both ordinarygrace and this tender land were written between contractual obligations. Now, Ihave signed a contract for a third companion novel and thank you. Builtinto the contract. A deadline that would allow me a full two years to donothing but focused on that particular words. Great. Yeah. Otherwise you'regoing to die way. It would be difficult to be away from Cork O'Connor for thatlong, but I'm willing toe to make that sacrifice. Yeah, alright. I'm sorry forinterrupting you, Patty. Now you could ask your question. No, no, that's fine.Plus, I like the name Cork O'Connor e o Don't read my books. It might show up.E you can't Everybody else read them, but can court e kristen voice in e. Iam sorry for butchering that middle name Keuren asks. Can you please tellus where you got the character of the pig scarer? I'm wondering the samething, actually. Sure. If you remember your odyssey. One of the adventures that Odysseus andhis men have is an encounter with a Cyclops. Paula, fema's uh, s O Paulo.FEMA's when I Jack is my pal a FEMA? Because if you remember E, let's see.How does how does oh DCs escape? He gets Paula FEMA's drunk. How does ODescape? You know, they feed when I jacked the corn liquor, you know? So onthat note, who are the sirens? The sirens aren't really in there. I hadinitially believed the sirens were going to be part of that. That sectionthat takes place on in hopers Ville? Yeah, And there would be a number ofpeople that ODI would the music would come into it. Instead, I decided tofocus in that section on, if you remember your Odyssey. At one point onhis journey, Odysseus meets a sorceress named Calypso. And he falls in lovewith calypso and Calypso falls in love with him. And Calypso nearly seduces Oh,DCs away from his journey home as May best Scofield nearly does. Right? Thatwas a close call, right? E hated that. You assume all of us have read ourodyssey some of our while. E will not mention we're reading Victoria Holtnovels E When I set out to structure the Odyssey I knew it was probablygoing to go over the head of most readers, you know, because you're right.How many people remember if they ever in fact read the Odyssey? You rememberthe honesty. I'm being like a four out of five of us. Read it. Then there'sLook what a failure you've been. Is the result very e doomed. You're writinglife e o. What went on the better the...

...dustbins of history. I'm sorry, yourhero's journey. All right, let's move from the live viewership. I think MaryKay you have? Yeah. Wait, Chris is it whose turn is that? I'm losing trackway, Barbara Byrd says. A common theme of the ordinary grace and this tinderland is redemption and forgiveness and how major plays a role in this. Can youelaborate on this theme? Well, it's interesting that that thecomment is is that nature plays a role in this because I'm just a Z. Thecomment comes in going well. You're right. It does. Doesn't the tornadoYeah, well, the I I just have to tell you that one of the ways in which Ihave been able to survive the coronavirus is by being outside as muchas I can I In the days when it was nice enough here in ST Paul to bike, I wasout on my bike every day. Um, now I'm out of my cross country skis as much asI can, or out or walking. Okay, so there's something about nature that issolace for the soul. You know, it is so comforting to be out there in nature.And so, as the kids are going through their epic journey, there are so manymoments when OD notices the beauty of the natural world around him, and itgives him hope. I'm thinking, for example, about the moment that heshares with EMI when they see the yield of fireflies. I was thinking that samething, that such a that was such a memorable snapshot. Well, I have totell you, Mary Kate, I was taking it from real life. My wife is from Omaha,and we have always gone down many times, and I remember one year many, manyyears ago after we headed down after work. So it was dark and as we uh, cameup to the crest of a hill in Iowa, the Iowa farm country and started to sendthe field. The valley on the other side was nothing but fireflies. As far itwas like you come down to Earth and a yes, that was a all right. Mary Kay. Yeah. D Walshwants to know what you are writing. Right this minute count. What are youwriting? I'm working on number. What will be number 19 in my corporateConnor Mystery Siri's. I haven't got a title for it yet, So if you guys wantto suggest a title to me e just ask Christian. She's are a get on the phoneafterwards. A you in five minutes. You know, readers, maybe our viewersConstituent Bible for you can. Well, my title my coca Connor Siris are alwaystwo word place names that have a significant, um, play a significantpart in the story. Haven't quite from the one yet, but it will come to me.It'll come to me. Oh, we'll follow you and we'll wait for it. All right, E um,now we get to the part where we really enjoy. This is the writing tip. And alot of our viewers are writers as well. So we'd love to hear, but you bit ofadvice you'd like to offer all of us. Sure, Um, here's my piece of advice onit's going to take a bit, but there's a story, I think, a really good storyassociated with it. So I think as writers, we need to think of ourselvesas artists and words are, and I don't care if you're an artist. I don't carewhat your medium is. I think if you're going to accomplish anything, you haveto approach it in a disciplined way. So I am a very disciplined writer for many,many, many decades now. My alarm clock has gone off at a quarter of six everymorning, seven days a week. We've got myself up and dressed before thecoronavirus. I would go to a coffee shop where we spend the first, uh,hours of the day writing. Um, now there. When I began that process, there was avery practical reason for my wife had just entered law school and I becamethe sole support of the family. I was the guy who had to keep a roof over ourhead and food on the table, but I wanted desperately developed as awriter, so I had to come up with a way to meet my responsibilities as a familyman. And also way we're living with that point of just a couple of blocksfrom an iconic Catherine and ST Paul to think they're broiler that opened itsdoors at six o'clock every morning, seven days a week. So I pitched thisidea to my wife. I said, Honey, if you're willing to get the kids up anddressed and fed and off to school first thing so that I could go right, I swearto you, when I come home from work at the end of the day, I will be the besthusband, the best father you can...

...possibly imagine. She bought it, sothey're e s. So there I was in the boiler at six o'clock every morningwith my pen and my notebook in hand. Because this was this was long beforewe even imagined laptop computers. Um, they would seek me in Booth number four.Always Booth number four. They saved it for me. Your book title? What was that?There's your book title. A a different book, Different book. I would open mynotebook. Pick up my pen and I would from from 6 15 until seven o'clock, Iwould write from six until 7 15. I would write, closed my notebook, payfor the coffee, go out front where it's 7 20 of us, picked me up and took me tothe university where I was working day in and day out. I did that which helpedme establish the discipline that I think it's so necessary to being awriter. But, you know, when I look back finally, on all of those years, Irealized that it had done something even more important for me. What Irealized when I look back was that if I wrote first thing in the morning, I wasfeeding something in me that needed to be form thing, energy to go out intothe world and get what you know, whatever I had to give to it, to keep aroof over our head and food on the table because I taken a care of thisvery elemental part of my pain. What I realized this writing had become theway I center myself in every day and create the energy to go out and meetthe world, and that's still one of the greatest blessing that I take away frommy writing. So, to any writers out there, my my best piece of advice isbeen to the work every single day, every day. You know, we all. We alldiscovered that the five of us discovered that during the pandemic andlocked down, we started doing these seven AM writing sprints can. I wasnever very disciplined about my writing times. I was all over the map. Andhonestly, I think that that discovery came really late in my career. But itis, I think, so. Helpful. It helps you stay connected to the energy of thepeace. Yeah, absolutely Well, in the mornings are so are much quieter unlessyou have a two year old running around. And there's a time where your four yearold work 22 year old e pretty quiet with a 22 year old. He's still asleep,right? E gets up in about a half an hour, this'll sense in the mornings ofthis, in between time, that really allows. I think Thio dive into thepeace in a different way, so I love that right Yeah, it's like stolenmoments that you could e have to admit. I borrowed it from Ernest Hemingway,who was a very early influences way was that he loved nothing better than torise at first light and spent two hour writing. He thought it was the mostcreative time of the day. And at least for me, I have to say I agree. Yeah, socan our readers are love toe Ask what our guest authors are reading. So doyou have a book that you can share that you love to recommend with everybody?Um, the do you know what I'm reading these days? And I'm guessing you are inthe same boat almost entirely are a RCs or bound galleries. Writers works thatI have been asked to read with an eye to offering a dust jacket, quote ablurb. So if I told you about what I was reading now you months and months,Who knows before you see it? But I will tell you the novel that I last readthat really knocked my socks off with a novel by least the wind gate calledbefore we were yours, for me was kind of a kindred story because, like thisSunderland, except during the Great Depression. And it's about resilienceof Children struggling against enormously. Yeah, she's She's a friend of ours hereon the show. That's good to hear that you like that. Yeah, it's such a goodbook. We have a few announcements. So everyone out there make sure to staywith us. You will not want to miss a miss are one final question for WilliamKent Krueger. Um, But before we dive into those quickly, I just want to tellyou the book. I just finished its Christie's under the Southern stuffwaiting. Oh, good. Oh my gosh, it's by Christie Woodson Harvey. It comes outin April. I said it in the news letter this week. I've always loved Christieis a writer, but this is Christy at the top of her game. This is This is a stepup. It's beautiful. It's I cried buckets, Iet's just so good. But we'llbe talking plenty more about it. But I couldn't let tonight pass without e ehave to loan you. Sorry. Well can hear...

...me. I'm sorry I disappeared. I lostpower in the house. E you can't do you have any recommendations of what youreading lately? Way. Mary Kay is just about to tell us about this week'sindie bookstore, anyways. Love When You about this week's indie bookstore,which is once upon a crime in, um, many Minneapolis right cat. Yeah, um, andthat they are offering 10% off all of Kents novels and the recent titles ofThe The Rest of Us, the F N F host. The link can be found on our friends andfiction Facebook page and like, I'll tell you, it was a long time ago, butI've actually done assigning at once upon a crime. I was back when I waswriting, um category mysteries. Yeah, it's a great it's a great town and anda great book store. So maybe when things get back to normal,can't we'll meet up and at the roaster is at the name of the place at the STClair Broiler, the ST Clair Broiler. I would love broiler. They have closedthe doors, had to find a new place to write. Oh,Christie, can you tell us a little bit about next week's show? Yes, so I'mhosting next week. I cannot wait. It's a just US episode. Where we're going tocelebrate are debut novels. Andi. Also we're going to introduce to you threedebut novelist Sarah Pinar, Nancy Johnson and Pamela Terry. And inkeeping with the theme on January 24th on our Sunday bonus episode, we'rehosting two fabulous Debut author Susan Dorinda, who is the author of Bells forEli and Alison Hammer, the author of You and Me and us So it's gonna Be agreat week to talk about debuts. Yeah, it was a good friend of the group, too,So that was exciting. Yeah, it's gonna be great. And we also wanted to sayThanks again to our sponsor, Mama Geraldine's. So remember to use thecode Fab Five at Mama Geraldine's dot com to get 20% off all online orders.And as Christie said, the shipping issue from last week is all resolved.Shipping is a great rate. Eso go and get your cheese straws. They'redelicious. Head on over stock up and as they say, snack on y'all and I'm anorthern translate e. Okay, e got it. Can't now we get to ask you the finalquestion and in your bio. It reveals you had an eclectic approach tolearning lifelong learning, which I love. So I'm especially curious tonightto hear your answer to a question that we ask most of our guests. What wereyour family's values around? Reading and writing growing up. And how do youthink that shaped you as the writer you are today? Great question. But before I answerthat I want to say this. I just want to thank you for all of the good work thatyou're doing for the for the writing community. All of us. Thank you forthat. And thank you for all the help you're giving to the independentbooksellers these days. Because as much as we all want them to still be therewhen we come out of this dip Endemic. So thank you for that. Eso If you wereto ask me, Mary Alice, why I am a writer. I would say it. Speak up frommy parents. Oh, that's what attribute. I'd be afraid, innit? Dream, though,because I blame everything on my parents E hope. Like your parents readto you as a child. I never went to bed at night. I never went down for a napwithout a story being read to me. So I grew up thinking of the world in termsof stories. For whatever reason, I always wanted to be one of thestorytelling. That's beautiful. And your father, yousaid, was an English teacher. Indeed. Iwas. Well, that explains a lot goinginto the classics. Thank you. Thank you Was such a treat. I knew you were goingto be genuine and beguiling, and indeed you were. And we all had such awonderful time. Thank you for being our guest tonight. Can't thank you so much.Thank you. Let's do it again soon. Yeah. Let's bring all face E on. Bring CorkO'Connor E. I highly recommend you all to read this tender land. And if youwant to get assigned to copy or personalized contact once upon a crimeand if you enjoyed our program, please...

...join friends and fiction on ourFacebook page or our website and give our podcast. So listen now withoriginal new interviews. And don't forget we're on instagram too. Thanksso much for joining us. Everybody See you next week. Until then, happyreading. Happy reading, everybody. Yeah. Thank you. for tuning in. Join usevery week on Facebook or YouTube, where our live show airs everyWednesday night at 7 p.m. Eastern time. And please subscribe to our podcast andfollow us on Instagram We're so glad you're here. Good night.

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